I did the right thing...right? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 19 Old 12-23-2011, 04:00 PM Thread Starter
Green Broke
 
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I did the right thing...right?

So, today, I caught my 3 year old to go for a little pre-Christmas trail ride in the snow.

I just started riding English a few weeks ago, so decided to use that saddle. When I tightened the girth, she pulled her lips back and swung her head at it. I thought it was because it was cold, so I let her stand in the stall for a few minutes.

I got on her outside and she wouldn't move forward. She did the same thing again, except as if she was biting at the girth. I thought she was just being dumb... so gave her a kick. She reared up a bit. Twice. Nothing that I can't handle, so do make a big deal out of that. I was in no mood to fool aroud with that at this point... at least in a saddle I was totally new to.

I took her back to the barn, plopped my rope saddle on her (to determine if it was the saddle), let that warm up, and got on. She got to bucking this time. It wasn't a forward buck, she wasn't stretching out it seemed. So, before she even stopped bucking, I hopped off, and got a halter and lead on her and "lunged" her, and once I attempted to get her in a trot, she reared up, higher this time, and bucked. I decided that she just wasn't feeling good and unsaddled her, but stood with her in the barn, she passed gas in the barn, and while she was bucking, and there was movement in her guts, so I ruled out colic for now, unless I see other warning signs.

So I just let her back into pasture and I'm keeping an eye on her as I go about chores and stuff, and if nothing comes up today, I guess I'll just have to try and ride her tomorrow. I'm guessing it's just a new idea from her little knieving mind to get out of being rode... but when she tried to bite at the saddle, girth, and that area, I got a little concerned.

"all I ever dreamt about was makin' it; they ain't giving it, I'm taking it"
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post #2 of 19 Old 12-23-2011, 04:12 PM
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I think it would be smart to call the vet, but I'm a pretty paranoid person as of lately.

I have no experience with stomach ulcers, but could it be that?
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post #3 of 19 Old 12-23-2011, 04:21 PM
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How much have you been riding in that english saddle?
I'm just asking because english saddles are (to my mind) a lot harder to fit than western saddles and since you use less padding under them, it's easier to make a horse really sore. If you've been riding in that english saddle a whole bunch, her back might just be sore and need a break from the english saddle long term until you find one that fits better.

For instance, my mare will accept a not so great fitting western saddle without much thought but put a slightly too narrow english saddle on her too many times and she starts throwing fits about any saddle. I think it's due to how the saddle distributes weight. The english saddle distributes it more centrally which highlights any fitting issues, while a western saddle distributes weight more evenly over the back which makes any fitting issues a little less severe.

My mare also bucks like crazy when she's having cramps at the start of her heat cycle. It seems like she doesn't always get cramps but when she does, I sure know about it! hahaha!

Just some thoughts. :)

Fabio - 13 year old Arabian/Lipizzaner gelding
Hazel - 14 year old Angora goat

Atticus - 4 year old LaMancha/Alpine cross goat

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Rest peacefully, Lacey.

Last edited by Wallaby; 12-23-2011 at 04:24 PM.
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post #4 of 19 Old 12-23-2011, 08:16 PM
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Well...to start with, I'm sure you know that cold weather causes crazy behavior in 3 year olds LOL!

I agree with Wallaby especially with a young growing horse. First step to me would be checking saddle fit. I have gotten in the habit of always tacking up with a loose girth and walking them out and tightening, then walking a small circle and then throwing a leg over.

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post #5 of 19 Old 12-23-2011, 08:25 PM
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So am I correct you just hop on and go? And if it isn't going as planned throw in a swift kick. No ground work and getting them prepped and warmed up a tad and then rechecking everything? I guess I would be more considerate so as not so sour a young horse and start it rearing and bucking. As soon as I saw warning signs I would be round penning and figuring out what the issue was. It sounds like this spiraled down hill fast.

Last edited by churumbeque; 12-23-2011 at 08:29 PM.
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post #6 of 19 Old 12-23-2011, 11:47 PM Thread Starter
Green Broke
 
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I've only rode her 3 times in the English saddle... over the span of like... 3 weeks.

I don't just hop on and go. I let her stand in the stall and warm the saddle up (both times) walked her around a bit, both directions, got on, and asked her to move. Just like and other time I've rode her. And she had a fit. I'll try again tomorrow... could just be a phase.

I tried to lunge her a bit after, in the western saddle, but she reared up and bucked when I made her trot.

It's definetly not the western saddle's fit, I've had it tested. And 3 rides in the English saddle probably didn't do it, especially cause she seemed to like the saddle, didn't get grumpy at it or swished her tail. Nothin.

"all I ever dreamt about was makin' it; they ain't giving it, I'm taking it"
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post #7 of 19 Old 12-23-2011, 11:59 PM Thread Starter
Green Broke
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by churumbeque View Post
As soon as I saw warning signs I would be round penning and figuring out what the issue was. It sounds like this spiraled down hill fast.
There were no real warning signs... She got over bucking a year ago. Has never reared before. All I noticed was that she got a little fidgety when I first tightened the cinch. I left it snug, and tightened it before we left the barn.

"all I ever dreamt about was makin' it; they ain't giving it, I'm taking it"
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post #8 of 19 Old 12-24-2011, 12:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by churumbeque View Post
So am I correct you just hop on and go? And if it isn't going as planned throw in a swift kick. No ground work and getting them prepped and warmed up a tad and then rechecking everything? I guess I would be more considerate so as not so sour a young horse and start it rearing and bucking. As soon as I saw warning signs I would be round penning and figuring out what the issue was. It sounds like this spiraled down hill fast.

I saddle and get on my horses immediately. I want to have a horse that broke. And sure as hell if they start disrespecting me by not doing where I point them they will get a kick. What did you expect the OP to do? Say "Okay we can do what you want to do today" and let her get away with it? I understand what you are saying but not every horse should have to be lunged and go through all sorts of groundwork before you get on their back. Even my two year old doesnt get groundwork and he's fine.

Anyway.

I do think calling a vet if she's not any better would be a good option. Sometimes they have bad days, cramps, or things we miss. Some are temporary, some are really bad problems.
Wallaby, Oxer and GeeGee Gem like this.

Pssh.I didn't pick up the wrong lead
It's called a counter canter...
...A very advanced maneuver.
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post #9 of 19 Old 12-24-2011, 12:57 AM
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I agree 100% with Sorrelhorse. I'm not saying it's wrong to do ground work, etc., but it's not necessary for every horse.

A vet is a good idea, or a chiropractor. It could simply be the weather making her frisky, but I wouldn't take the chance...
Tell us what happens tomorrow, please? :)
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post #10 of 19 Old 12-24-2011, 09:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QHriderKE View Post
There were no real warning signs... She got over bucking a year ago. Has never reared before. All I noticed was that she got a little fidgety when I first tightened the cinch. I left it snug, and tightened it before we left the barn.
A little fidgity is a warning sign, when she balked was a warning sign. I think on such a young horse more ground work might be benificial
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