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I need your help with an emaciated horse

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  • +one scoop of equine senior weighs
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    08-07-2009, 10:09 AM
  #11
Super Moderator
Unlimited hay + some alfalfa (start adding slowly), little portion of grain/mash/oil as many times a day as you have time for, and may be some hay pellets too.
     
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    08-07-2009, 10:14 AM
  #12
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
Unlimited hay + some alfalfa (start adding slowly), little portion of grain/mash/oil as many times a day as you have time for, and may be some hay pellets too.
Yes - multiple small meals will be easier for her to digest.
     
    08-07-2009, 11:05 AM
  #13
Weanling
My rescues are given free choice coastal and started on 911. I give the 911 at 1/2 oz am & pm for at least 14 days. I also give the 911 3 days before and after any worming or events on ALL of my horses. I will also give a little alfalfa too - I am one that prefers the pasture blocks of compressed alfalfa to rolls of coastal and like mine to have access at least 6 hours a day.

Your mare could probably go straight to my "stage 2" where I start adding feed. I LOVE Ultium. I feed at least twice daily (3 times is better) and total out at least 6 pounds a day Ultium. I generally start at 1/4 to 1/2 scoop 3 times daily with 911 and build up to 6 lbs, then adjust as needed after 10 days or so at 6 lbs. You should weigh it until you figure how much in your scoop weighs what.

Once they are starting to put weight on I backoff or stop the 911 (except to give at worming or events) and move to Bloom.

If the horse is older I start 911 and Total Performance immediately and once I reach "stage 3" I add in Bloom in place of 911 and continue Total Performance.

Here is an article about figuring just how much protein your horse needs and how much he is actually getting per day and the sources of protein.

My 2 yr old colt currently gets regular sweet feed fed at the barn he is at, Colt Grower, DDA, Calm-B and almost free choice coastal.

Once I get him down here he will get 911 prior to the haul and stay on it at least 2 weeks, switch to Ultium, continue Colt Grower and switch to Bloom from 911 once he is settled. Will see about the Calm-B. By Nov I will add in Breeder's Choice in prep for the breeding shed.

Another great combo is Bloom and Orange together. And if you like using Oil the Bloom can be replaced with Oil.
     
    08-07-2009, 11:12 AM
  #14
Foal
We took in a pregnant mare that looked worse than the one that you took in and what the vet told us to feed worked wonders with her

Morning feeding
2 scoops Equine Senior (weighed out to be 4.5 pounds)
1 heaping scoop of alfalfa cubes

Afternoon
1 scoop alfalfa pellets
1 scoop beet pulp

Evening
2 scoops equine senior
1 scoop alfalfa cubes
Pro-Bios
Joint supp

It worked great and the best part the equine senior from Purina already has the rice bran, beet pulp, blood builders, weight buliders, coat supplements, vit supp, and hay already built in so I didn't have to add all that stuff to her feed everyday so it made things so much easier on me.

This is her on march 1


And this is her on August 3
     
    08-07-2009, 11:25 AM
  #15
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzyrider    
i suggest adding the beet pulp into her diet.
Yes, yes, yes!




You need to start off slow, don't let her over indulge. The body is in shock. Because she's accustomed to not getting food, the complete 180 of getting fed regularly will take some acclimation for her digestive system and metabolism. I would definitely start off with small, frequent meals. Some flax seed oil wouldn't hurt either, getting her some precious Omega oils. Just pour 1/4 cup over some grain (whichever you're giving her) once a day.
     
    08-07-2009, 12:01 PM
  #16
Weanling
Be sure if you feed a complete feed like that that you give the appropriate amount. I had a bad experience when I moved to SC and the barn there fed Triple Crown senior. That is a great feed and I loved how it read on the ingredient tag (even for my babies), BUT she cut my growing babies down to 2 lbs a day with free choice coastal. They looked OK until you pulled them off the hay for a half a day or worked them then they were down right SKINNY - agggghhhh. Triple Crown Senior MUST be given at at least 6 lbs a day and adjusted per individual. Ultium you could get away with giving 2 to 3 lbs a day, but not that Senior.
I moved my babies 2 months ago and I am just now getting them to really look good. My filly still needs more meat on the flanks to not look so T-boned at the hips, but her shoulders, chest and ribs are covered nicely and she has a shine to her now.
My colt is filling out - I had him fat and muscled in Feb. Then he grew and that feed regime just wasn't doing it for him. He grew 4 inches at the hips in 5 months. He has meat covering his ribs now, but his muscles are still jiggly.

Weigh your feed so you know just how much you are giving.
     
    08-07-2009, 06:54 PM
  #17
Yearling
Ok, so far I'm feeding her and Carolina (much to Carolina's happiness) 4 times a day.

I've added better more detailed pictures in the Picture section.
     
    08-07-2009, 07:14 PM
  #18
Foal
The vet in our area suggested a scoop hay stretcher twice a day with what ever grain you are using. I used a BLUE SEAL BRAND vintage victory grain. Feeding three flakes of hay three times a day that way you know how much they are consuming. Free feeding is great but it is hard to tell how much they are actually eating, start off knowing how much this horse is consuming in a day Plenty of water too. Good luck
     
    08-08-2009, 11:28 PM
  #19
Foal
Poor thing. She looks sweet.
I have a cribber myself. I think he picked up the habit when he was neglected a year before I bought him. The Miracle Collar *works* but it really depends on how bad she is. My horse still tries to crib, but he can't. On some horses it will make them stop trying, too. My miracle collar has also rubbed him pretty badly in certain spots... However, I haven't ever tried any other collar so this might be your best bet if the the metal one isn't working.
Not sure who mentioned it, but someone said that once you get a horse back to health/weight they will stop cribbing. This is usually not true. You may have some miracle that it will stop, just make sure that horse always has a job! Free choice hay has always helped my guy. That and having company to frolic with. Lol

I also agree that she needs a new name... not too good at the feed or naming part...
     
    08-10-2009, 03:21 PM
  #20
Yearling
Is she a former racehose? Just curious. Ulcers could play a part. I agree with lots of what the PP have said. Beet pulp is great. Also utilize the resources at your feed store. They should have a feed company rep who will give you a good plan and work for the horses individual needs.
     

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