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I need your help with an emaciated horse

This is a discussion on I need your help with an emaciated horse within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Vitamins to give emaciated 20+ years old horse
  • Draft horse weight measuring tape

 
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    08-10-2009, 04:07 PM
  #21
Yearling
No local feed store sadly. I think the closest one is a couple of hours away.

No she's not a former racehorse. She's an Irish Sporthorse (Irish Draught x Thoroughbred).
     
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    08-15-2009, 07:52 AM
  #22
Started
If I posted a photo of my Irish Draught X Connemara you'd realize what good dooers the Irish breed. I have to watch her food - she'll put on weight just for being left on grass for too long.
You should get a measuring tape to go round the belly - so as to keep a record of her waist line and weight
Firstly - have you wormed your horse yet? Ask the vet what the local parasite problem is.
Second What's the grass like?
Third Any hay about? What about oat straw.
Fourth The Spanish down south feed alfalfa
Fifth sugar beet.
My girl loves carrots, apples & parsnips
     
    08-15-2009, 08:24 AM
  #23
Started
Your mare looks to me like a poorly girl. If only I could I'd send you some of the fat off my Irish Draught X Connemara who needs to lose some weight. IDs as a breed are good doers and put on weight easily if treated well.
I feed my mare grass, a pasture mix with vitamins, plus the occasional apple, carrot, parsnip, swede. To get medecine down I give her some sugar beet
SHe also gets a salt supplement as many pasture needs added magnesium
Mine also gets a molasses lick in the winter months. She is fed oat straw or alfalfa if she gets too fat.

If your horse were mine I'd check: Teeth, & worms, and I'd call the vet - which you have done.

I'd buy a tape to measure her waist and weight on a daily basis and I'd record everything I fed her

With a horse that thin, I'd worry about saddle sores

But the real worry is giving her too much too quickly - she'll be at risk of both colic and laminitis. She needs to build up slowly. Maybe fed three or four times a time - little and often.
My girl has a blanket when the temperature drops below 5degc.
She has a raincoat if the rain looks to be heavy

Have you tried sending an email with photo to one of the better known animal feed compounders. They'll come back with some ideas, If the Aussies won't , then send to the Brits - they will reply I am sure.

If she is a crib biter then some horses inherit the habit but some develop it thru stress. If she has been starved or neglected then that is stressful. Wood splints can lodge in the throat but you would see signs of a blockage.

I'd watch her eat too. Does she want to eat? I'd walk her in a halter to grass
And make sure she ate.

Well done, that horse needs some Tender Loving Care. I wish you well. But look out for behavioural problems. A horse is motivated by fear, food and sex - your horse may have had too much fear, too little food and no sex.

She'll need careful handling and your risk now is colic - perhaps followed by laminitis. Poor girl, she doesn't need either of those problems.

Be lucky.

Barry G

Maybe I ought to show my mare a photo of yours, then she'll know how well off she is now. Trouble is, she already knows I am a sucker.
     
    08-15-2009, 12:55 PM
  #24
Foal
Hello!

I highly reccomend Dumor Weight Booster. It runs around 20 bucks for a bucket. Add one scoop (provided in the container) to her feed morning and night. I just got a horse that we are trying to build up who fought for his food. He's a score 2. This weight booster working great along with good feed and good costal hay.
     
    08-16-2009, 01:24 PM
  #25
Yearling
You need to be extremely careful about refeeding this horse. It is quite easy to "kill with kindness" when you are dealing with a starved horse because their body has modified how it provides energy for it's cells. Please read this article and use the information to design a refeeding program for your horse. Otherwise you could accidentally end up causing renal failure.

Nutrition for Rehabilitating the Starved Horse
     
    08-16-2009, 01:37 PM
  #26
Started
Unfortunately all I could tell you about feed is what I fed my mare on a daily basis, but she was just a hard keeper, never that thin. The only horse I've had that was that thin was a 3 year old gelding who was actually even thinner than that when I put him down, he was never starved either, we just found out after we put him down that he had poisoned himself eating fiddle neck weed. But hopefully you can fatten her up, and give her an awesome loving home. As for names, maybe Hope as a barn name, since she now actually has hope of becoming a healthy happy horse again.
     

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