Important HYPP survey! ALL TAKE PART! - Page 2
   

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Important HYPP survey! ALL TAKE PART!

This is a discussion on Important HYPP survey! ALL TAKE PART! within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Hypp thoroughbred
  • Information about Impressive bred horses HYPP RESULTS =N/H

View Poll Results: HYPP SURVEY
My horse has Impressive in his pedigree 23 34.33%
My horse does not have Impressive in his pedigree 27 40.30%
My horse has HYPP and has Impressive in his pedigree 1 1.49%
My horse has HYPP but does not have Impressive in his pedigree 0 0%
My horse does not have HYPP 33 49.25%
I do not know if my horse has Impressive in his pedigree nor if he is infected 2 2.99%
I have tested my horse for HYPP 13 19.40%
I have not tested my horse for HYPP 21 31.34%
I was un-aware of HYPP 5 7.46%
I am aware of HYPP 41 61.19%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 67. You may not vote on this poll

 
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    02-21-2011, 09:16 PM
  #11
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedNag    
But do you have paints or appy's they can also carry the impressive gene
Nope. Minis, a Paso Fino, a Percheron, and Thoroughbreds.
     
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    02-21-2011, 09:28 PM
  #12
Yearling
Mistakes aside. I find it very interesting how it was mis-diagnosed with many common ailments such as tying up sydrome, colic and seizures. I guess that has do with fact that blood testings were not as elborate as they are now.
     
    02-21-2011, 10:15 PM
  #13
Foal
Our Paint, Flashy Tuxedo is double Impressive bred. We had him tested by UC Davis in September of 1996 when we purchased him. He tested N/N. The letter from UC Davis is very informative. They keep a record of all horses tested by case #. The following is taken directly from the letter issued by UC Davis.

"The test indicates the presence or absence of a base pair substitution in the horse skelatal muscle sodium channel gene. The abnormal gene codes for a defective sodium channel protein that causes the disease Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis (HYPP). The result appears below along with an explanation of the code.

Result Codes:
H/H = Hyperkalemic - Homozygous for HYPP ( two copies of the HYPP gene).
N/H = Hyperkalemic - Heterozygous ( one normal and one HYPP gene).
N/N = Normal - Does not possess the disease-causing HYPP gene.

The condition is inherited as a dominant trait, which means a Heterozygous (N/H) stallion or mare bred to a normal (N/N) horse will result in approximately half of the offspring being affected and half being normal. The rare Homozygote (H/H) is usually severely affected with the disease."

Flashy Tuxedo Paint

More here: http://www.vgl.ucdavis.edu/services/hypp.php

Hope this helps.
     
    02-22-2011, 05:09 AM
  #14
Foal
Our yearling has Impressive 5 generations back. I have not tested her yet but plan too only for possible future breedings.
     
    02-22-2011, 09:41 AM
  #15
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brookside Stables    
Our yearling has Impressive 5 generations back. I have not tested her yet but plan too only for possible future breedings.
If there is a question as to the possibility of your yearling carrying the HYPP genes then you should want to have her tested in order to properly care for her should she be HYPP/NH or HH. There is a special feed regimin that you'll want to follow and then some basic supplies you'd want to keep handy such as glucosomine should she ever have an attack. It will also change the way you handle her when showing and transporting.

Actually, now that I think of it...Beginning with the 2007 foals, all Impressive progeny are required to be parentage verified and HYPP tested subject to the conditions listed in rule 205. Any that test H/H will not be eligible for registration.

You may not have to test her though since you have papers. Just check the last known Impressive relative, what I'm saying is follow the trail to the final Impressive bred horse. If the trail ends at one horse and that horse is HYPP/NN then the gene would not have been passed and your horse will be NN.

I am surprised at some of the ignorance in these responses and by ignorance, I mean that I can tell that some of the folks posting don't know much about the desease, they know enough to understand it but not really the mechanics. An article would be good I think.

As for the comment you made about it being strange that they misdiagnosed so much, you want to look at it as, a new disease. They had no knowledge of it's existence because it hadn't been discovered yet so you have to rule out all the things that it's not before you realize, wait, this is something new. Then they have to figure out what it is and why it's happening, and of course they have to figure out where it came from. This is where a lot of people act like Impressive was a bad horse and the people that bred to him were "idiots" and they don't realize that no one knew it existed or where it came from.

I have 2 Impressive breds, they are line bred top and bottom. A mare and a gelding. Both are NN. I love the line, I'd buy another in a heart beat. (NN).
     
    02-22-2011, 10:03 AM
  #16
Yearling
Thank you very much farm pony. It's quite an elborate disease and wanted to get a statistic from the horse forum for an article. I hoping to include a large part as to prevention of the genetic trait and how to possibly put a complete stop to it.
     
    02-22-2011, 10:11 AM
  #17
Started
Just curious as to why if someone didn't have their horse tested, why they wouldn't. The test ime isn't that expensive and adjusting diet BEFORE any issues can prevent symptoms from appearing later in life from what I have read and my vet has said. Is that correct? Just trying to learn more!

Thanks!
     
    02-22-2011, 10:28 AM
  #18
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ82Sky    
just curious as to why if someone didn't have their horse tested, why they wouldn't. The test ime isn't that expensive and adjusting diet BEFORE any issues can prevent symptoms from appearing later in life from what I have read and my vet has said. Is that correct? Just trying to learn more!

Thanks!
I can see not testing a horse that is not registered and doesn't have the appearance of an Impressive bred horse but knowing your horse is Impressive bred and potentially a carrier. I have no idea why you wouldn't test, because as you've said, the disease can be very manageable with proper diet and care. We actually have a person on this forum that owns and shows an HYPP horse. She does get attacked when she enters these discussions so we probably won't hear from her but she, as far as I know, has enjoyed a very normal horse by caring properly for it. You could actually own a horse that is NH and is non-symptomatic and could spend it's entire life never having an attack, but... then again, it could have an attack someday since there is no cure, only a treatment through diet and some drugs, but only for management of symptoms, not a cure.

One interesting thing about these animals is that, although they may go through life without an episode due to diet and care. In the end, it seems their hearts go and I think that's because of the sugars...So in the end, it does ultimately kill them. However, they could live into their 20's comfortably. I personally don't reccomend one for riding uses due to fear of an attack, however if you have the extra time and money to feed and care for one and have a need for a pasture mate, sometimes this is a cheaper alternative than taking on a crippled horse. Just a thought.
     
    02-22-2011, 10:28 AM
  #19
Trained
You are not going to bet good stats from a open forum like this and not anything I would use for any type of an article. You need to call places like UC Davis and get real stats from real researcher. That is the only way to get what you need to back up any conclusion you need to make.

This Genetic disorder has been around for years and so has the test. My stallion is a 1990 model and he was tested back when the test was new and first came out. There is a lot of misinformation out there.

If you have a horse who traces to Impressive it needs to be tested regardless of intent to breed or not. HyPP is not like OLW or HERDA. It is a dominant disorder and horse are affected with only one copy of the gene. Where OLW and HERDA they are simply carriers and not afflicted.
     
    02-22-2011, 10:54 AM
  #20
Showing
My current mare does not have Impressive in her pedigree but I've owned a few horses that did. I avoid any Impressive horse that isn't N/N.
     

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