Injecting vs Fenestration? - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 12 Old 04-12-2013, 09:33 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
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Injecting vs Fenestration?

Which is better for a locking stifle? My vet said my guy has locking stifles :( I can choose between injecting with steroids and fenestration.
Fenestration is described as:
"the vet stabs into the stifle area with a small scalpel to create scar tissue to develop. It does not cut through the stifle ligament, it just makes small cuts in it. After two weeks off, you start working your horse again and inflammation will occur and the ligament will develop scar tissue and tighten. This is done while the horse is standing and sedated. No stitches and only minor bleeding. The horse goes home right away. The risks are very low with this method and you do not have to worry about arthritis. It is low invasive and safe." from another user on another Forum.
Which would be a better option?
Thanks


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post #2 of 12 Old 04-13-2013, 09:45 PM Thread Starter
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post #3 of 12 Old 04-13-2013, 10:19 PM
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Personally, I've seen lots of up and downhill leading and consistent work bring a horse with locking stifles (so bad he couldn't stand for farrier work and actually almost went down on me a few times) back to perfect as long as the exercise was consistent.

I can't say anything about the options you've posted about though, as I've never had one with locking stifles.
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post #4 of 12 Old 04-14-2013, 07:38 PM
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Fenestration worked tremendously well and was cheap. It was easy, fast downtime and great if you can't keep the horse fit all the time.

Married to my One! 10-11-13 Steampunk style:)
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post #5 of 12 Old 04-14-2013, 08:04 PM
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My locking stifle standardbred benefitted tremendously from squaring the hind toes. He could go exactly 6 weeks between trims, 6 weeks 1 day he would start locking up.
On top of that 24/7 turnout, hill work and lots and lots of trotting helped him develop enough muscle to keep the ligaments tight.
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post #6 of 12 Old 04-14-2013, 09:58 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you! It is really bad and he is pretty in shape and he still does it :(
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iseul View Post
Personally, I've seen lots of up and downhill leading and consistent work bring a horse with locking stifles (so bad he couldn't stand for farrier work and actually almost went down on me a few times) back to perfect as long as the exercise was consistent.

I can't say anything about the options you've posted about though, as I've never had one with locking stifles.
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post #7 of 12 Old 04-14-2013, 09:59 PM Thread Starter
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Do you mind me asking how much you paid? Was your horse locking up REALLY bad? How long is the recovery time?
Thanks!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinity3205 View Post
Fenestration worked tremendously well and was cheap. It was easy, fast downtime and great if you can't keep the horse fit all the time.
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post #8 of 12 Old 04-14-2013, 10:01 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks! My guy is out 24/7 but still does it :( I have tried that too :(

Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman View Post
My locking stifle standardbred benefitted tremendously from squaring the hind toes. He could go exactly 6 weeks between trims, 6 weeks 1 day he would start locking up.
On top of that 24/7 turnout, hill work and lots and lots of trotting helped him develop enough muscle to keep the ligaments tight.
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post #9 of 12 Old 04-14-2013, 10:31 PM
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It cost about 350 but that included a tooth float while he was sedated along with some meds thatvwere supposed to help.also. Took about 2 weeks and the vet said ride/excercise him even tho he was still a bit sore at that point. He was not terrible but bad enough.
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post #10 of 12 Old 04-14-2013, 10:47 PM Thread Starter
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Did he have badly locking stifles? How ling was full recovery?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinity3205 View Post
It cost about 350 but that included a tooth float while he was sedated along with some meds thatvwere supposed to help.also. Took about 2 weeks and the vet said ride/excercise him even tho he was still a bit sore at that point. He was not terrible but bad enough.
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