Keeping Medicines "room temperature" in your hot tack room? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 09-08-2013, 03:08 AM Thread Starter
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Keeping Medicines "room temperature" in your hot tack room?

Hi All,
I'm in Southern California where temperatures have been spiking at 100+ degrees lately. Medicines and other things in our emergency vet kits, such as Vetericine, have a storage requirement of "room temperature" and storing away from heat. So in a boarding situation where there is no AC, how do you store your items? Would a styrofoam cooler without ice work? This would be for general year round storage.
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post #2 of 13 Old 09-08-2013, 03:21 AM
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Keep in mind where I'm at doesn't get quite as hot as that but lately we've been reaching up there. lol It depends on the medication. We typically ask our vet and she gives us the yay or nay. Usually though she says it doesn't matter, just make sure it's not open and there's good ventilation. If we have any doubts we keep it in our house! haha We had a bottle of potomac medication in an unheated tackroom during the winter while we were treating a horse that said 'room temp.' but it did just fine. Never froze or anything so long as the door was kept shut and the bottle closed up. In the summer we had a couple of banamine shots that did just fine. If you have any questions I would ask your vet, they would know more about what could withstand it. :)
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post #3 of 13 Old 09-08-2013, 04:58 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Incitatus32 - I guess what i'm looking for is a way to ensure I can keep those medicines and other oitments safe. Like, is there a way I could build a box or something to keep them in and keep the heat out, with no electricity?
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post #4 of 13 Old 09-08-2013, 05:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kittenkittenkitten View Post
Would a styrofoam cooler without ice work? This would be for general year round storage.
This would certainly help even out the temperature, but I have no idea if it would keep it within the range that medicines suggest on the label. Perhaps you could test it out by putting a thermometer in a cooler and one outside. I imagine others would be interested in the results.
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post #5 of 13 Old 09-08-2013, 07:36 AM
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Yes, I keep mine in my laundry room cupboard in a plastic container, rather than at the barn. If I need something in an emergency, I just go up to the house and take it down to the barn. Same with emergency things for your saddle bag...store the saddle bag there too. We have excessive heat in the southeast as well. Storing them this way can also keep them effective, even after the expiration date (according to my Vet). :)
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post #6 of 13 Old 09-08-2013, 08:31 AM
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What can happen during extreme temps, either too hot or too cold, is the actual drug portion of the medication can break down or looses efficacy. Often the carrying agent that a medication may be in, ie: a drug that is in a oily carrying agent, such as an injectable vitamin or antibiotic, may not freeze, but the extreme temps can still harm the actual drug in the oily liquid.
Same with ointments too. Some drugs are affected more than others and some not at all….just depends on the drug or medication.
Some are not affected at all though.

They really should be kept in a temp controlled area such as a house, but in a boarding situation sometimes that is not possible. Can the BO provide a controlled environment? How about taking them back and fourth with you when you go there?
Trying to build a “cool” box is a good idea in theory, but unless it’s next to a cool area such as the cold water pipes or and air conditioner, there isn’t a whole lot that can be done to keep a box cold without ice packs, as I‘m guessing the temps don't go down enough over night to cool the box.
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post #7 of 13 Old 09-08-2013, 09:01 AM
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A cooling box may work, but it would need to be a heavy, thick box with a small cooler inside with some newspaper in between the two. the cooler alone won't have walls sufficient enough to regulate the heat. the outer layer with insulation will diffuse the ambient room temp.

The barn I used to keep my horse at had an enclosed tack room / office. Cement floor and simple walls. Definitely NOT built to house quality for insulating purposes.

There was heat and a ceiling fan that were only in use while the barn / tack room was in use. otherwise, heat (oil drip not forced air) was not on in the winter.

this room was naturally 10-15 degrees cooler or warmer than the outside and the attached barn.

to keep the meds at room temp during the summer, you would only need to keep the temp box of direct sun. It may not be the room temp you want, but it will definitely be less than the outside temp. I wouldn't worry about ice. this would work for winter, but I doubt your area will be that worrisome of freezing. Since heat rises, you want the box in the lowest part of the room, under another object like a desk wouldn't hurt either..

You can get an inexpensive indooor/outdoor temp reader. get a device that has two units. One goes outside to read the outdoor temp and one goes indoors to read the indoor temp.

put the outdoor temp in your cooler contraption and the indoor one in the room itself. (this way you can read the cooler temp without opening the cooler.)

if built right, you will find the cooler temp is cooler than the general room.
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post #8 of 13 Old 09-08-2013, 10:10 AM
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We've got high humidity that further compounds the heat issue

I keep the Vetericyn and OTC medicated creams at the barn but I keep the high dose/expensive and/or prescription stuff in the house.

Some of it in the refrigerator as it's potency does last longer if it's in the refrigerator.

A good example is the Tucoprim I've had in the refrigerator for a couple years. I had a horse slice his rear ankle up pretty good last week.

I've dealt with these kinds of wounds in the past, so I called the vet to explain how I treated it and asked about the Tucoprim.

The vet told me to double the Tucoprim dosage because it was old but had been kept in refrigerator.

I also keep bute pills and Banamine paste in the refrigerator all year long.
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post #9 of 13 Old 09-08-2013, 11:22 AM
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A small dorm fridge that is not kept at the lowest setting could replicate room temperature during the very high heat months.

However, running a dorm fridge in an environment that is hot will cause it to run more frequently. the electric bill may be more than buying the meds more frequently.
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post #10 of 13 Old 09-08-2013, 11:50 AM
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Couldn't survive the hot-n-humid summers down here without a small window unit in my tack room. I keep it set so it keeps the humidity down otherwise all my leather would be green!
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