L-Thyroxine for laminitis? - Page 4
   

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L-Thyroxine for laminitis?

This is a discussion on L-Thyroxine for laminitis? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Vaccinating a horse that has laminitis reactions

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    11-18-2012, 09:36 PM
  #31
Green Broke
Talk to him. I think you know now what to do and what to look for, so there shouldn't be any further problem once he's down to normal weight.
     
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    11-18-2012, 09:40 PM
  #32
Green Broke
Definitely, thank you all so much for the help.
Honestly this year has been one kick in the teeth after the other...this was the icing on the cake.
     
    11-18-2012, 09:46 PM
  #33
Green Broke
It's almost over
You are very lucky in several aspects, trust me. I wish I have had at least a vet with knowledge when my mare foundered . Let alone a farrier.
I didn't have this forum either.
To see what folks here are capable of, go to the health section and search for "need help please" by Okan. Its pretty long, and still going, so you need a little time.
     
    11-18-2012, 09:54 PM
  #34
Green Broke
You're right, it's not so bad...though I think it's been going on for weeks to be honest. It started right after he was vaccinated, I thought he was sore in the neck/poll from that.
     
    11-18-2012, 10:17 PM
  #35
Green Broke
You know, now that you say that....my mare just had had her flu shot, had a bad reaction to it, full blown flu, and shortly after she became sore......since it's a metabolic disease, I sometimes wonder....
     
    11-19-2012, 07:25 AM
  #36
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
You know, now that you say that....my mare just had had her flu shot, had a bad reaction to it, full blown flu, and shortly after she became sore......since it's a metabolic disease, I sometimes wonder....

That's why my vet won't give my metabolic horses shots anymore


He did give everyone a rabies shot in 2011 and believe me, it was with more than "some trepidation". He did not want to vaccinate the metabolic guys; especially since the 25 yr old always has been drug sensitive and is worse now. He will have a reaction to Bute


We had two horses and a mule get bit and die on their own farms from rabies, in the NW portion of the county. 25 - 30 miles isn't too far where rabies is concerned.


The vet vaccinated my 25 yr old in the butt to help reduce "travel time" of the vaccine, so-to-speak. The vet also stayed a good 30 minutes extra to watch Duke because Duke did, indeed, have a reaction


All Duke had was the punies and thankfully no laminitis issues.


Thankfully my herd is considered isolated due to where we live and I don't trailer anyone to ride anymore so noone gets anything anymore, unless the vet says "I really think ---------" as he did with the rabies shots. His philosophy is that less is more unless my horses would be traveling like they used to.
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    11-19-2012, 09:36 AM
  #37
Green Broke
I agree. Especially with all the hype now with WNV. My neighbor has a small herd of Aztecas. Out on 160acres, bordering the wetlands. Never vaccinates. Horses are as sound as can be. He just now started to bring some hay in to get them ""tame"...other than that, they live off the non-irrigated "pasture", together with 25 cows. They are skinny by the end of winter, catch up quickly once grass comes in, stay fat and shiny well into December, and have no problems with that lifestyle. Makes me wonder how much we overdo everything, seriously.
When I was in Italy, where my mare foundered, I didn't dare doing the flu/tetanus shots, after she got so sick from it, and couldn't find tetanus shots only. They just don't have them. So I ended up not vaccinating them for 6 years. NEVER any problems.
They were a closed group, never in close contact with the travelling horses, and were vaccinated earlier in life. Makes me think that immunity lasts a lot longer than we're made to believe. And that, given a chance, they develop immunity to certain diseases too.
Certainly food for thought.
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    11-19-2012, 10:10 AM
  #38
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
Makes me think that immunity lasts a lot longer than we're made to believe. And that, given a chance, they develop immunity to certain diseases too.
Certainly food for thought.
I don't want to morph the OP's thread too far OT but further to your thoughts:

I asked my vet about testing my 25 yr old for titre levels (this was before the 17 yr old was diagnosed) and his response was not to waste my money

The reason for that was the pure fact this horse IS metabolic and his immune system has, indeed been compromised.

The vet further explained that Duke could have the highest titre levels (highest safety level) in the herd and still be the first horse to develop a disease he's been vaccinated against. Reason-being the metabolic issues have compromised his immune system.

Still-in-all he's dead against vaccinating this horse because #1, he's a mid-20's horse whose always had his shots and was healthier/stronger than ten horses until the metabolic issues took over.

#2, as we've been discussing, are the metabolic issues in combination with age.

The whole thing puts a new twist and meaning on "Catch-22" ?
     
    11-19-2012, 10:39 AM
  #39
Super Moderator
Different horses will react in different ways to all things so what works for one may ot work for another
If Thyroxene is for a thyroid hypothyroidism then it is a permanent thing but a lot of vets do use it as a short term treatment for laminitis that's IRS linked, like anything that affects the bodies metabolism it should be reduced gradually though
My own vet had such great results with chromium on a laminitic IRS pony he adopted to save from being put down that he suggested it to me for my IRS mare, I now feed it to her as Quiessence which is a magnesium chromium supplement. Once a horse is full blown IRS as mine is they have more trouble keeping weight on then they do losing it - in the same way as diabetic person does The horses develop abnormal fatty deposits but don't keep good healthy condition so well because their insulin isnt working the way it should
My horse is no longer laminitic in the sense of the word though she was a really severe case and very close to being euthanised, her soles arent dropped any more - now concave. I did have her shod for the first few years to protect her as the pedal bones were still at risk and her soles still lower than normal but she is now sound barefoot.
She is treated the same as my other horses, I restrict grazing for them all now as a precaution but they go out daily on acreage and I balance that with time in the stable
I feed her Sentinel senior (Blue Seal) and add non molassed sugar beet to it - its never given her any problems
She also has all her shots annually and never had a bad reaction to those either
     
    11-19-2012, 10:46 AM
  #40
Green Broke
I definitely don't think it was coincidence that his episode started after the shot. How could it be?

It sucks though, since Brandon is only 18, I do ride him on trails and trailer him around. :/ Then again, who knows what his feet are going to be like after this?

A very good friend of mine who now lives out of state suggested Soft Ride boots and Farrier's Formula Double Strength.
     

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