Lame or Not Lame???
 
 

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Lame or Not Lame???

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  • Omega horseshine and navicular horse
  • Horse slightly lame after being lame for ages

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    12-11-2012, 10:43 PM
  #1
Foal
Lame or Not Lame???

After a long search my daughter and I purchased our first horse at the beginning of November. A week after he came to our barn after 2 to 3 short walk/trot rides he came up lame. (Yes, I had him vetted before we bought him). We had the vet out. He located the lameness in his front right and did some nerve blocking. Blocking the toe got about 60% relief. Blocking the heal and the back of the pastern got 100%. X-rays showed some changes to the navicular bone but vet thinks that this is proabably a normal finding for a 19 year old. Sole was thin and he was barefoot despite previous owner normally having him shod. He also had soft frogs. Long story short, the vet, who is also a farrier, put wedge shoes on the front to see if they would relieve pressure on soles and the navicular bone. We went on vacation for 2 weeks during which a friend lunged him 2 times to see how he was doing and rode him once when he seemed to be good. Now after 3 weeks we are trying to figure out if he is sound or not. Since we are new to horse we could use some extra eyes. How does he look in this video?
     
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    12-12-2012, 07:40 AM
  #2
Green Broke
The video is dark but as he keeps moving out he looks slightly off to me.

Your first step to correct his issues was in the right direction

Were he mine, I'd be having the chiropractor out to evaluate him. NOT an equine massage therapist, a chiropractor.

Hopefully you have one or two good equine chiropractors in your area. By good I don't mean they have pieces of paper credentials dripping off their finger tips. While that certainly helps, when it comes to equine chiropractics, instinct is very important.

Diet is important. No grains, molasses, no BOSS, no anything that exacerbates inflammation.

Omega-3 Horseshine is a balanced flax that helps tremendously with hoof and coat health.

How long had the Seller owned this horse? What was it used for? Whose veterinarian vetted the horse and how thorough was the vetting? What are your plans for this horse? Trail riding, showing, hunter/jumper? What his job is to be, may make a difference as to how that lameness affects him, if it's permanent.

I'm just trying to figure out why they really sold him as I read stories like this a lot more often than I like. To your great credit, you had a PPE done but, sadly, they aren't always 100% unless X-rays are taken.

I hope I am all wet because the video isn't too clear and maybe he's just reacting to the depth of the arena flooring.
     
    12-12-2012, 11:42 AM
  #3
Banned
Id say he's got a bit of a limp not horrible but its there.
     
    12-12-2012, 12:30 PM
  #4
Foal
The previous owner had him for 6 years. He was used for 4-h and equestrian team, mostly western pleasure. He wasn't used much last year since one of the owners was in college and her sister used their other horse until that horse was injured at fair. So she used this horse for the last couple equestrian team meets prior to selling him. Because he wasn't being used this summer they didn't shoe him even though they usually did. They said they were selling him because the owner wanted to show in the quarter horse circuit and this horse wasn't that competitive.

We were looking for a safe horse for my daughter age 9 to use for 4-h and some fun local shows. My daughter rides mostly english and is starting to jump crossrails but in our area 4-h is more western oriented so while this horse is more western than english we didn't think it would be a big deal from a competitive sense because she is only 9 and more interested in riding than winning :)

Our vet did the vetting and he appear to do a thorough job. We didn't have x-rays done because it seemed like excessive cost for a 19 year old horse that was suppose to be a little girls lesson and 4-h horse. The horse flexed a 1 on the right hock but other than that seemed ok. The only thing I can think of in hindsight is we did the vetting at night at the sellers home and their wasn't great light and the horse was a bit slow to trot off. We (the vet, the owner and I) attributed that to the horse being lazy but now I find myself wondering. The only other finding was a tiny bit of tenderness on his soles which the vet during the exam said could be because he was use to being shod or it could be navicular and that if we wanted to be sure we could xray. But the vet's general impression was that this horse was very healthy for a 19 year old and he didn't push the x-rays so I figured it wasn't likely. When the vet check was done I was a tiny bit concerned but I thought I was being unreasonable in expecting a 19 year old to be free of any trouble, and we had looked at so many horses that were so obviously unsound or had such bad temperments or training that I wasn't sure we would find better. Hindsight sure is 20/20 :(

Now I am worried about what to do with a senior horse that may not ever be sound for my daughter and I to ride w/t/c. We live in the city so having a pasture pet isn't an option and he isn't in such obvious pain that euthanasia woud seem merciful.

Sorry for the novel.
     
    12-12-2012, 12:44 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mydaughtersgroom    
The previous owner had him for 6 years. He was used for 4-h and equestrian team, mostly western pleasure. He wasn't used much last year since one of the owners was in college and her sister used their other horse until that horse was injured at fair. So she used this horse for the last couple equestrian team meets prior to selling him. Because he wasn't being used this summer they didn't shoe him even though they usually did. They said they were selling him because the owner wanted to show in the quarter horse circuit and this horse wasn't that competitive.

We were looking for a safe horse for my daughter age 9 to use for 4-h and some fun local shows. My daughter rides mostly english and is starting to jump crossrails but in our area 4-h is more western oriented so while this horse is more western than english we didn't think it would be a big deal from a competitive sense because she is only 9 and more interested in riding than winning :)

Our vet did the vetting and he appear to do a thorough job. We didn't have x-rays done because it seemed like excessive cost for a 19 year old horse that was suppose to be a little girls lesson and 4-h horse. The horse flexed a 1 on the right hock but other than that seemed ok. The only thing I can think of in hindsight is we did the vetting at night at the sellers home and their wasn't great light and the horse was a bit slow to trot off. We (the vet, the owner and I) attributed that to the horse being lazy but now I find myself wondering. The only other finding was a tiny bit of tenderness on his soles which the vet during the exam said could be because he was use to being shod or it could be navicular and that if we wanted to be sure we could xray. But the vet's general impression was that this horse was very healthy for a 19 year old and he didn't push the x-rays so I figured it wasn't likely. When the vet check was done I was a tiny bit concerned but I thought I was being unreasonable in expecting a 19 year old to be free of any trouble, and we had looked at so many horses that were so obviously unsound or had such bad temperments or training that I wasn't sure we would find better. Hindsight sure is 20/20 :(

Now I am worried about what to do with a senior horse that may not ever be sound for my daughter and I to ride w/t/c. We live in the city so having a pasture pet isn't an option and he isn't in such obvious pain that euthanasia woud seem merciful.

Sorry for the novel.
I also see a little bit of a "bobble" on his front end. However I would definintely discuss his current situation with your vet(or another) before jumping to the "worst case scenario". There are a tons of things that can be done to help him get sound before having to consider euthanasia. Different shoes, previcox, pads, supplements etc.

ETA: I am a little concerned that they mightve taken his shoes off so that they could attribute any lameness to that :/
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    12-12-2012, 12:47 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Maybe just shoeing him again would help. (?)
     
    12-12-2012, 01:25 PM
  #7
Banned
Hes not really really lame iam sure something can be done to get him sound. Don't give up yet I think theres hope for him.
     
    12-12-2012, 01:40 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Your novel was a good one - full of all the right information

I agree to not give up on him, especially if you're not enthused about any sort of jumping.

Believe me, please believe me, proper diet really does go a long way in holding back inflammatory issues. Which, in turn, will help hold the horse's weight down<---in turn putting less pressure on any spots that already have issues.

TKButtermilk said:
Quote:
ETA: I am a little concerned that they mightve taken his shoes off so that they could attribute any lameness to that :/
I never thought of that but it's a possibility

Flax has done a terrific job of toughening up my horses' hooves. That doesn't mean they became "rock crushers". It means that my flat soled horses that has always been sensitive and now has metabolic issues, has stronger hooves than he ever had, once I put him on Omega-3 Horseshine and he is 25 years old - lol

I honestly would stay away from grains and especially run-don't-walk away from anything full of molasses, like sweet feed.

If there is navicular, that is no longer the death sentence it used to be. There are now many ways to treat it without surgery. I am not Navicular Informed, hopefully others can offer some input.

Your daughter being only nine means there's not much weight going on his back so that also helps. Hopefully you can get him conditioned enough and his hooves/legs in condition to where you can also enjoy a spin or two around the woods

At age 19, I still vote for a chiro. I could write a book on how the chiro keeping the sacrum adjusted on one of my horses helped speed the healing of his torn ligaments on the front. Everything's connected and while the chiro can't fix navicular (if that's what's wrong), having the entire skeletal system in proper alignment will also help reduce discomfort
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    12-12-2012, 01:58 PM
  #9
Foal
Not giving up on him but concerned since my daughter would like to jumping and this was one one of things we asked the vet about at the vet check. We weren't expecting anything big just hoping to do under 2' once a week after he regained some fitness. Right now she is majorly disappointed because rather than being able to practice w/t/c a couple times a week we head out to the barn and walk him around for 15 minutes before seeing if he is still off at a trot. It is kind of hard for a 9 year old. The other concern is that while my daughter is a whole 65 pounds I am 191 pounds. Given that the horse is a 15.2 hh stocky quarter horse the vet didn't think that would be problem.

All that being said, the vet/farrier put wedge shoes on his front feet about 4 weeks ago. He doesn't get any sweet feed (he gets 12 oz rice bran, 2 pounds alfalfa pellets and about 1/2 bale of grass hay). We started him on glucosamine 3 weeks ago and added Chrondroitin and MSM a week ago. The good news is that he is better than he was without shoes. The bad news is he isn't any better than he was after the addition of shoes and a week of rest. I have a call into the vet to do more evaluation. I have also considered the chiropractor but I decided to see if I can get a diagnosis first.
     
    12-12-2012, 01:59 PM
  #10
Trained
First of all, don't panic
He is slightly off in the video, and leaving him barefoot after being shod all the time could have been the trigger. As walkinthewalk said, even if it's navicular, it doesn't mean it's a death sentence. Omega Horseshine does improve hoof quality(I'm completely hooked on that stuff), and depending on if you can find a capable barefoot trimmer, this could be a solution. It takes a bit of time, since practically a new hoof has to grow out. Im hoping one of the trimmers here will see this thread and comment. Pics of his feet would be nice, taken from ground level and the sole, if it's visible with the shoes.
     

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