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Laminitis in my pony

This is a discussion on Laminitis in my pony within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
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    06-05-2012, 11:44 PM
  #21
Yearling
Laminitis can be a very frustrating disease. None of those meds should increase temp. I would do some research in your area and find a good farrier who has experience working with laminitis and who is willing to give you some clients as references. If they bad mouth/won't deal with a vet, move on. This disease takes the cooperation of a veterinarian who can treat the underlying medical problems leading to laminitis and a skilled farrier who can treat the resulting hoof problems. They need to be a team. Don't stress, keep him comfy as possible with bute, bedding, cold hosing, etc. and assemble your team of pros to help you. Do your research on equine metabolic syndrome and don't be afraid to ask lots of questions. Vets go to school for years to understand this stuff, you can't be expected to know it all in a matter of weeks! Best of luck, which seems to be a key ingredient in success as well!
     
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    06-06-2012, 12:05 AM
  #22
gjb
Foal
Thanks so much! I hope tomorrow is a better day. One last thing about the blue foam to put on their feet, does it nee d to be on all4? How do they balance if you put it on the front only?

I will have to try and put his feet in cold water in a bucket, don't know if he can walk to far.
Thanks again. I did order some remission a couple of days ago.
     
    06-06-2012, 06:07 AM
  #23
Trained
I like & agree with your posts Tealamutt, especially regarding the risk of gastric damage with NSAIDs. I didn't think this was confined just to a combo of drugs though? Also I believe there is evidence to suggest this gut damage - leaks, ruptures, ulcers, etc, due to drugs, acidosis & such - and resulting toxins entering the blood are a likely cause of laminitis, so it's a particularly relevent concern.

One thing you said tho... "There is no cure for laminitis." Which bit of it are you saying there's no cure for? I definitely don't believe they're all cureable, but for eg. I understood that EMS/IR was reversible with good diet & exercise, although PPID appears irreversable. 'Rotation', sinking or other separation of the hoof capsule can be reversed too, but if the horse has been chronic for a long time & there are boney changes, this may not be improved, particularly if it's got to the stage where there is substantial loss of the distal tip of P3.

One thing to OP, assuming his feet are well trimmed to relieve further mechanical stress on laminae, assuming he's over the actual 'attack' and assuming he can be made comfortable, with foam pads, boots or such(I do not believe forcing a horse in pain is a good move at all), &/or worked on yielding footing, exercise is a good thing & if you can make all that work in the paddock, he shouldn't need to remain locked up long.
     
    06-06-2012, 08:53 AM
  #24
gjb
Foal
What a wonderful group. Thanks for your heartwarming compassion, advice and support..
Anyone in the OH area?
     
    06-06-2012, 09:33 AM
  #25
Yearling
Loosie, you are right, gastric damage is not confined to this combo but when you use more than one NSAID you can have a multiplier effect. NSAIDs reduce the blood flow to the gastric mucosa and this is where you have the problem. If a horse were to not have enough access to water you can also increase their harmful effects. I just wanted to point out the side effects of that particular combination.

You cannot "cure" laminitis or IR. These diseases are managed but you're not going to get rid of them entirely the way you might with say, a bacterial infection using antibiotics. This is why I feel you have to have a great vet in addition to the farrier. IR is something that must be medically managed, much like diabetic. By medical management I don't necessarily mean giving drugs, but changing diet, and exercise are key factors and will be for life. Stop the lifestyle changes and you will have an IR pony again, often worse and more unmanageable than before you got it under control.

Also, you cannot reverse rotation. You can mitigate the effects of it and hoof wall separation but once rotation happens, it remains for life which is why we try so hard to catch laminitic horses before they rotate and/or sink.
     
    06-06-2012, 09:33 AM
  #26
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by gjb    
What a wonderful group. Thanks for your heartwarming compassion, advice and support..
Anyone in the OH area?
Try calling Thom Gabel. He's out of Tipp City.

He's an AFA Certified Journeyman Farrier, past president of the AFA chapter in this part of Ohio and one of the best practitioners I know in the area. He will likely have a specific veterinary recommendation.

1-937-667-6453

Email: tgforge@live.com

Cheers,
Mark
     
    06-06-2012, 09:48 AM
  #27
gjb
Foal
Mark,
I just called Dr. Kline of Woodland Run. He can't come until next Wed. They will do x-rays. More than I have got from anyone else.
Off to Lowes to get some foam to put on his feet. Also when I get back will have to put his feet in bucket of cold water. They don't feel hot.
Thanks for your info. I will call. I hate seeing any animal in pain. He has been such a wonderful pony all these years. He deserves the best!
     
    06-06-2012, 09:53 AM
  #28
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tealamutt    
You cannot "cure" laminitis or IR. These diseases are managed but you're not going to get rid of them entirely the way you might with say, a bacterial infection using antibiotics. This is why I feel you have to have a great vet in addition to the farrier. IR is something that must be medically managed, much like diabetic. By medical management I don't necessarily mean giving drugs, but changing diet, and exercise are key factors and will be for life. Stop the lifestyle changes and you will have an IR pony again, often worse and more unmanageable than before you got it under control.
Correct.

Quote:
Also, you cannot reverse rotation. You can mitigate the effects of it and hoof wall separation but once rotation happens, it remains for life which is why we try so hard to catch laminitic horses before they rotate and/or sink.
Incorrect.

Application of orthotics can, in many cases, provide stabilization of the distal phalanx and restore correct phalanx alignment. If the disease is arrested, new growth lamellar attachment can restore correct spatial orientation of P3 within the hoof capsule.

No one can 'cure' laminitis but many horses do live through it. The trick is in managing the catastrophic secondary mechanical failure associated with the pathology so we can buy the animal time to recover.

A big part of that 'trick' is the reduction of the DDFT mechanical pull responsible for the rotation. Sinkers are a different and more serious ballgame with a generally poorer prognosis.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    06-06-2012, 09:54 AM
  #29
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by gjb    
Mark,
I just called Dr. Kline of Woodland Run. He can't come until next Wed. They will do x-rays. More than I have got from anyone else.
Off to Lowes to get some foam to put on his feet. Also when I get back will have to put his feet in bucket of cold water. They don't feel hot.
Thanks for your info. I will call. I hate seeing any animal in pain. He has been such a wonderful pony all these years. He deserves the best!

Call me.

1-513-325-5031

Cheers,
Mark
     
    06-06-2012, 11:15 AM
  #30
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseman56    
Correct.

Incorrect.

Application of orthotics can, in many cases, provide stabilization of the distal phalanx and restore correct phalanx alignment. If the disease is arrested, new growth lamellar attachment can restore correct spatial orientation of P3 within the hoof capsule.

No one can 'cure' laminitis but many horses do live through it. The trick is
Interesting Mark, please link to the studies that show this. I'm serious (not being snotty)! In 10 years of studying veterinary medicine I haven't come across this at all so I'd love to learn more. I know there's more than whats in the books, but I have to see radiographic proof of this before I can tell my clients it is true.
     

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