Limping Post Hoof Trim
 
 

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Limping Post Hoof Trim

This is a discussion on Limping Post Hoof Trim within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Why does a horse limp after a hoof trim
  • Should trimming your horse make them limp

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    03-17-2013, 06:26 PM
  #1
Yearling
Limping Post Hoof Trim

Shooter got shoes last summer for fair. During the winter he was supposed to get them off, but due to roads being bad, and the farrier being about two hours away to get his shoes off.

Well... He threw a shoe.

Then... Some months later threw the other one.

About two weeks ago, he got a hoof trim but not quite as much was taken off as should have been because my instructor did his hooves and didn't want to take too much off and risk him being lame.

Well, now he is limping.

I didn't see him limping prior before taking him out, he seemed fine tacking, hop on, and we walk. Nothing there. Start trotting and something seemed off, not sure what. But he went ridiculously slow. He naturally goes slow but this was like a notch above a walk slow.

He tosses his head which is also another bad habit, so I turn him and make him turn sharply. He got a little hot from it and thought it was time to be a pain in my you know what and be an onry twat, which, is also habit of him. By now I see he is limping, and I thought he was just stiff and I should take it easy. So we go along at a very slow canter, and... He crow hops. Post crow hop, he keeps tripping and now the limp is slightly more noticable. This becomes concerning.

Break to a walk and he tries tossing his head and trotting off on his own accord, but trips again.

Basically the limp got worse and I hopped off, bugger tried trotting off on me as I led him which he got schooled for. Checked his shoulder, no swelling, no super hot spots. But a warm spot right in that angle where his neck and shoulder meet, right along there.

I checked his back, rechecked his shoulder no tenderness. Gave some liniment, stretched his leg and walked him out. He got some aspirin in his feed, too, if he is in pain.

I am going to inform my instructor when I see him tonight for practice and arrange to see if he can recheck him for me and help deduce if a vet is necessary. For now, Shooter will be on rest.

Did the shoe cause him to favor, and once he was level, bring him pain? Part of the reason I kept him going wass that if he -was- just stiff, the work could loosen it up. But the crow hop and the unnaturally slow gaits made me think otherwise. He goes faster, and he wanted to, but was resigned to be slow.

His owners aren't super horsey, so is there anything I can relay to them? My instructor is also their grandson, so he will probably instruct them on how much aspirin to use, how long, and what else to do.

I'm kind of kicking myself, but hopefully it isn't anything worse.
     
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    03-17-2013, 08:17 PM
  #2
Yearling
So wait, the horse wore the same set of shoes from summer into winter and threw them finally?
     
    03-17-2013, 08:42 PM
  #3
Banned
Uhmm.. id call certified farrier asap.. that's pretty horrible. That is animal cruelty to let the poor guy suffer.. if the owner wont call a proper vet out, they don't deserve to have him.

on a side note-- asprin is known to eat the stomach lining and result in ulcers..
     
    03-17-2013, 08:46 PM
  #4
Weanling
That's a really long time to leave the same shoes on...
     
    03-17-2013, 09:00 PM
  #5
Yearling
What I'm concerned about here is the fact that the horse was left (and worked) with one shoe on.
Running around with one shoe on is at the least uncomfortable. Working him like that probably putting something out of place.
Also, shoes should be changed every 6 weeks or along those lines (I only had to shoe a horse once).
I think you need a farrier out ASAP! And it wouldn't hurt to get a chiropractor out as well.
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    03-17-2013, 11:11 PM
  #6
Yearling
No, the horse was never worked with one shoe on.

We were unable to get the farrier out to get the shoes off, and yes, the owners got an earful by my instructor. This horse is not abused and I am quite honestly offended at it being called so. They never used shoes before, the horses always went barefoot up till last summer because we were worried about them being lame from the hard as rock arena that is made of primarily sand (which yes, we intend to fix, if you want to call that animal cruelty, too).

His back isn't sore. I checked it. Not a single twitch of pain.

Shooter was worked for no more than ten minutes before I hopped off, and my instructor doesn't think it was the shoe that caused it, but he is going to check.
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    03-17-2013, 11:18 PM
  #7
Yearling
Glad to hear that he wasn't worked with just one shoe! That had me concerned.
     
    03-17-2013, 11:20 PM
  #8
Foal
Wait... did the horse have the same set of shoes on the whole time?! If so that's part of your problem and secondly that's pure negligence. Either way, rest him give him low doses of bute or aspirin for the pain, and call a farrier or vet out asap.
     
    03-17-2013, 11:36 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deschutes    
Shooter got shoes last summer for fair. During the winter he was supposed to get them off, but due to roads being bad, and the farrier being about two hours away to get his shoes off.

Well... He threw a shoe.

Then... Some months later threw the other one.


About two weeks ago, he got a hoof trim but not quite as much was taken off as should have been because my instructor did his hooves and didn't want to take too much off and risk him being lame.

Well, now he is limping.

I didn't see him limping prior before taking him out, he seemed fine tacking, hop on, and we walk. Nothing there. Start trotting and something seemed off, not sure what. But he went ridiculously slow. He naturally goes slow but this was like a notch above a walk slow.

He tosses his head which is also another bad habit, so I turn him and make him turn sharply. He got a little hot from it and thought it was time to be a pain in my you know what and be an onry twat, which, is also habit of him. By now I see he is limping, and I thought he was just stiff and I should take it easy. So we go along at a very slow canter, and... He crow hops. Post crow hop, he keeps tripping and now the limp is slightly more noticable. This becomes concerning.

Break to a walk and he tries tossing his head and trotting off on his own accord, but trips again.

Basically the limp got worse and I hopped off, bugger tried trotting off on me as I led him which he got schooled for. Checked his shoulder, no swelling, no super hot spots. But a warm spot right in that angle where his neck and shoulder meet, right along there.

I checked his back, rechecked his shoulder no tenderness. Gave some liniment, stretched his leg and walked him out. He got some aspirin in his feed, too, if he is in pain.

I am going to inform my instructor when I see him tonight for practice and arrange to see if he can recheck him for me and help deduce if a vet is necessary. For now, Shooter will be on rest.

Did the shoe cause him to favor, and once he was level, bring him pain? Part of the reason I kept him going wass that if he -was- just stiff, the work could loosen it up. But the crow hop and the unnaturally slow gaits made me think otherwise. He goes faster, and he wanted to, but was resigned to be slow.

His owners aren't super horsey, so is there anything I can relay to them? My instructor is also their grandson, so he will probably instruct them on how much aspirin to use, how long, and what else to do.

I'm kind of kicking myself, but hopefully it isn't anything worse.
I bolded what I find conflicting, and disturbing. In your first post, the one I quoted above, you state that he got shoes for fair last summer, farrier not able to come out because of bad roads in winter, he threw a shoe, THEN some months later he threw the other one. Some MONTHS later? So he was left for months with one shoe off and one shoe on? But in your latest post, he did have farrier care? Whats the truth? Whether he was worked or not, that is not right. He is probably so unbalanced and sore, not just his feet, but his entire body, just from that. Trimming should be done at a minimum of every 8 weeks. Between summer (June, July, August) and now (2 weeks ago) was 7 months, if we just say the horse had shoes put on in August and not earlier. If that's the case, I would certainly expect him to be sore when he finally got a trim after 7 months, and probably why the farrier didn't want to take too much off, to possibly sore him even more.

I'd be giving your friend some hoof care information at the very least, if they were my friend.
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    03-17-2013, 11:37 PM
  #10
Yearling
No, it is not negligence because they did call the farrier but were put off because of winter driving conditions. They did not do this purposefully, and I would appreciate it such things were not flung around.

He could have also been kicked by his pasture mate, which is something we are going to have to figure out. Next week my instructor is going to take a look at him.

The trim was also two weeks ago, so we don't understand how between two weeks and now something happened.
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