Limping thoroughbred!
 
 

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Limping thoroughbred!

This is a discussion on Limping thoroughbred! within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Horse limping on back leg
  • My thoroughbred is limping

 
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    02-27-2012, 03:04 AM
  #1
Foal
Limping thoroughbred!

A couple weeks ago I was riding an 8 year old OTTB that I lease (and looking to purchase soon) when he stumbled a little on his back legs. Immediately after he started limping a bit, coming from his hind. My trainer says it wasn't visually that obvious, but it felt pretty obvious.

My trainer immediately wraps his legs, but no swelling ever occurs. She ends up thinking it may be a pulled muscle so she brings out a chiropractor to work on him. The chiropractor rules out any joint issues. After a week off of riding and few weeks of just trotting the straightaways of the arena he seems to be back to normal. After about 3 weeks of that, we finally started cantering and jumping crossrails and he seems perfectly fine.

I'm not sure if they every figured out exactly what happened, but I'm concerned because I would like to know if its something that may reoccur in the future, or cause permanent damage. It's never happened in the past. So I'm wondering if it really was a muscle issue or what.

This probably isn't relevant, but his front hooves are slightly uneven. One narrower then the other. I've done some research on this, but can't seem to come up with a definite answer if this is something that can cause him to become permanently lame. I've asked one of my trainers about this and he claims that its hereditary for thoroughbreds sometimes (I don't think I bought that for some reason). Then I have another trainer telling me that the uneven-ness can cause him to be uneven all over, thus sore. Ahh I'm so confused!

I do have a vet coming out this week for a pre-purchase exam, but I just want to get other opinions. He's a big purchase so I just need some advice!
Thanks!
     
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    02-27-2012, 03:32 AM
  #2
Showing
Okay, just for a bit of clarification, exactly how long did he limp? You said how much time he had off but you didn't state how long he was lame.

Anyway, about the shape of the hooves, it is fairly common for a horse to have slightly differently shaped hooves. Just like many people have one foot slightly larger than the other. If you have a good farrier that can keep him balanced and trimmed/shod properly, then there should be no lameness issues that result from the mis-match. A good farrier will adjust his angles and hoof shape to optimize what is natural for him. A bad farrier will throw off the angles or shapes to try to make everything match cookie cutter perfect and that will cause a lot more lameness issues than just keeping him balanced for what he is.
     
    02-27-2012, 12:43 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
Okay, just for a bit of clarification, exactly how long did he limp? You said how much time he had off but you didn't state how long he was lame.

Anyway, about the shape of the hooves, it is fairly common for a horse to have slightly differently shaped hooves. Just like many people have one foot slightly larger than the other. If you have a good farrier that can keep him balanced and trimmed/shod properly, then there should be no lameness issues that result from the mis-match. A good farrier will adjust his angles and hoof shape to optimize what is natural for him. A bad farrier will throw off the angles or shapes to try to make everything match cookie cutter perfect and that will cause a lot more lameness issues than just keeping him balanced for what he is.
When I got on him the week after stable rest, he wasn't limping anymore. He maybe felt a little stiff but it was definitely better then when it first happened.

Thank you for the hoof explanation!
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    02-27-2012, 02:16 PM
  #4
Showing
Since the limp was relatively short lived, I would bet that he just stumbled and either pulled a muscle or tweaked a joint. I've done it myself a few times with an ankle or a knee, I'll step wrong and twist something, it'll be sore for a few days, and then I'm fine, but there is no medical clues on why it's sore (no bruising, no swelling, no tenderness to the touch, it just hurts). Horses do that too occasionally. So long as the PPE doesn't show anything abnormal, then I wouldn't give that another thought.
     
    02-27-2012, 02:30 PM
  #5
Weanling
I have had my OTTB mare do this a couple of times too, trips a little and acts really lame but recovers really quickly. I figure she's probably just stung herself or tweaked something really minor. My vet recommened I work really hard to keep her fit by riding her often and doing cavelleti and hill work to improve her stifle strength. Also making sure she is fit and properly warmed up for jumping.
Also, what I would recommend to you is to have a vet check done if you are thinking of purchasing this horse, or any other horse for that matter!! Good luck with him, I hope this is helpful!!
     
    02-27-2012, 03:11 PM
  #6
Foal
Thank you so much for the responses! Very reassuring. Hopefully the PPE goes well and I'll be the new owner of an amazing horse!
     
    02-27-2012, 05:50 PM
  #7
Started
If a horse favours one leg over the other (because of a pain/lameness/conformation issue), the hoof which is taking the weight more of the time will spread more resulting in one hoof wider than the other.

I would be suspicious of this and of the 'temporary' lameness that you describe. A TB with soundness issues can be a very expensive pet...

Put head over heart when making your decision - remember, there are many ex-racers without question marks over their soundness.
     
    02-28-2012, 04:38 AM
  #8
Yearling
Uneven feet can be a sign that the horse is not putting equal weight on his feet - always think that front feet should be a pair, the sole of the front feet should be round - not oval. The back feet are more oval.

Soemtimes when a horse has been lame - eg has had an abscess the sound foot maybe larger and flatter because the horse has been putting more weight on the sound foot.

The vet will tell you wether the horse is suitable for your purpose.
     
    02-28-2012, 09:22 PM
  #9
Foal
I think smrobs is pretty much right on the money. I have an OTTB. He just turned 13, but he's stubled a couple times, and acted lame for a very short period of time. I'm sure it hurt, tweaking a muscle or joint, and he limped on it for a day or so. I walked him, rubbed the leg down with linement, and he always came right out of it. As far as the hoof being wider, again, smrob is right on that one. It can be corrected with proper trimming and work.
     

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