Mad at new farrier - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 42 Old 05-25-2010, 11:16 PM Thread Starter
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Mad at new farrier

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post #2 of 42 Old 05-25-2010, 11:26 PM Thread Starter
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Oops. I forgot to actually post.
Okay, so the thing is I switched barns and we just decided to use that farrier because it would be much much easier. So we had him shod and the farrier kept putting his shoes on too far back so Jesse kept ripping them off so we decided he would be fine barefoot. (it would be much easier than explaining that he oversteps. Anyway. A little while ago I noticed his feet
were really long and were cracking. Apparently the fArrier said he was fine and that
he could wait another 6 weeks. That's 12 weeks! I told my mom this so she left a note on the board saying that even if the farrier says he can go longer that he should still do them.
The thing is that when Jesse's feet get long they crack (big time) and his feet get sore and he trips.
Just ranting hehe.
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post #3 of 42 Old 05-25-2010, 11:49 PM
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Did you TELL your farrier he oversteps? It sounds like you didn't. That's not the farriers fault then.

As for 12 weeks in between- yes some of my horses have gone that long. My farrier was in a motorcycle accident and we had to scramble to find a replacement. It took over 3 months to find someone. No one went lame, no one was grossly overgrown. In my area a lot of people don't even trim over winter, I usually trim in November and then again they get trimmed in March, then every 6-8 weeks until November again. We don't ride during that time because its so nasty out and cold, and too much ice. If I had an indoor arena (I wish!) that would be different, but they simply don't grow very fast in winter.

Its not the matter of how long, its a matter of how his hooves hold up.

Spent a whole hour today laying in a pasture, waiting for a sparkling vampire to show up. Alas, I woke up and looked over, only to find a mound of horse crap. Sigh.
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post #4 of 42 Old 05-25-2010, 11:58 PM
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Farriers know what over-reaching is, and will correct their shoeing for it, and it's fairly easy to explain - I guess I'm very confused as to why you wouldn't just say "he over-reaches, you can't leave a heel on the shoe"?
Bell boots can help prevent a horse from ripping shoes off, but it won't guarantee it.


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post #5 of 42 Old 05-26-2010, 12:43 AM
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my horse over-reaches...and she has some heel on her shoe,but that's because she needs correctional shoeing kinds thing.
Maybe tell him he over-reaches?
If you decide to look for a new one,good luck :)
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post #6 of 42 Old 05-26-2010, 07:41 AM
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I must have missed something. You are a new client to this farrier and you have not been at the barn so you can tell the farrier your horses history and specific needs?

Make the time to be there when the farrier is there and explain that your horse over reaches. The farrier might even want to see the horse move. I also suggest apologizing for not communicating with him/her more clearly to start with.

Dealing with your farrier is like everything else in life. Communication is the key! Farriers can not read minds.

And as JDI suggested, buy yourself a couple of pairs of bell boots.
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post #7 of 42 Old 05-26-2010, 08:07 AM
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Actually the term is "forging". A new farrier, at least a good one, will watch a horse move before starting his work. How can a blacksmith know how to properly trim a horse without knowing how he/she moves and what the horse's job is?

I'm not arguing with you, I'm just explaining why I'm right.

Nothing sucks more than that moment during an argument when you realize you're wrong.


It's not always what you say but what they hear.
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post #8 of 42 Old 05-26-2010, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses View Post
Actually the term is "forging". A new farrier, at least a good one, will watch a horse move before starting his work. How can a blacksmith know how to properly trim a horse without knowing how he/she moves and what the horse's job is?
This was my thought too.

It would not surprise me that the BO/BM, or whoever takes the horses out of their stalls for the farrier, does not want to be bothered to do that part and just tells the farrier to trim them.
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post #9 of 42 Old 05-26-2010, 09:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses View Post
Actually the term is "forging". A new farrier, at least a good one, will watch a horse move before starting his work. How can a blacksmith know how to properly trim a horse without knowing how he/she moves and what the horse's job is?

My farrier spent a long time assessing Hunter before she even touched his hooves. He had a lot of problems due to poor trims and she has corrected them all. A good farrier is so important. So glad I found one
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post #10 of 42 Old 05-26-2010, 10:27 AM
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It's a good idea to always be there when you horse's feet are being trimmed/shod. It's easy when you are boarding to slack off this responsibility, but you miss out on both being able to accurately pass on important information to your farrier (like the fact your horse over-reaches) as well as miss out on any important details about the trim or things your farrier can teach you about your horses feet. BO's are busy and don't always make this communication a priority - nor is it their responsibility to. Make a point to always be attending your own horse for ANY farrier or vet appointment.


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