Making a Vet Kit - Page 21
   

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Making a Vet Kit

This is a discussion on Making a Vet Kit within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • How to fold veterinarian kits
  • How to fold vetenarian kits

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    08-20-2012, 11:05 PM
  #201
Weanling
From This
Day 1

To This
Day 23

Using
Saline solution - made up in a pressure spray bottle. Pump up, spray onto wound to flush and stay safe.
Active Manuka Honey
Disposable Nappy (Daiper)
Vet wrap - Bandaged as a figure 8 bandage
Soft towels as leg wraps and a face cloth to place over the back of the hock.

Finally
Vaseline - placed around and below the wound
Saturated Copper Sulphate solution to remove proud flesh

These are the total items required to look after this large wound. No expensive potions & lotions required.

The wound was cleaned initially by the vet and three antibiotic injections given over three days. The wound has been totally clean with being washed with saline - the wound was not wiped or touched by hands until it came to the removal of proud flesh. Then woound washed with a face cloth folded in four, soaked in saline, passed over the wound, changed side, passed over wound and if not clean then re folded to expose clean side and wiped again. Cloth never placed back in water, excess saline thrown over the wound. Wound allowed to dry before new Copper Sulphate put on it.
Current weather conditions, heavy rain, flooding and mud - so you can see that the wound was not very clean at the start. The horse from day three has been on box rest and still is at 27 days. The reduced movement has helped considerably.

Thought I would post this to show that your first aid kit does not need to be elaborate or extensive that a few items can do very well.
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    09-01-2012, 06:13 AM
  #202
Foal
I usually have a vet kit containing not all of listed above but sorts of them.. it's difficult for me to include all stuffs but generally I prefer to visit a vet doctor in case of severe injuries of my horse..
     
    09-09-2012, 11:10 PM
  #203
Foal
Add this app to your list, might come in handy too.
Knowing what is normal for a horse.
https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...d=mobione.home
     
    09-09-2012, 11:18 PM
  #204
Foal
@ Tnavas
Great example of wound care at a low cost :)
What a great result too.
     
    09-09-2012, 11:36 PM
  #205
Weanling
Thanks livinghorses - just off to do todays treatment - washing everything off and leaving it totally alone for a week, proud flesh is at skin level and wound decreasing in size.

Biggest expense was the Honey - but worth every cent
     
    09-15-2012, 10:23 PM
  #206
Started
Kerlix for making wet to dry bandages.
35 cc syringe for flushing wounds.
Detergent for cleaning instruments (buckets, twitches, etc.)I've before disinfection.
PineSol for disinfecting instruments. (Or other phenol-based product. Make sure to rinse metal objects well, as phenols can be corrosive to metal.)

It's not something you can put in your kit, but a lesson in bandaging wounds from a vet or other qualified person. There are lots of tricks to learn, like how to apply a pressure bandage.
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    09-15-2012, 11:29 PM
  #207
Weanling
From what I've seen recently of a vets skills in bandageing a horse I'd be more inclined to go and ask a Pony Club instructor! My horse came back from the lease owner when he was injured, their vet had dressed the wound by placing a melolin dressing on the wound and a few turns around the leg with some vet wrap, no padding to even out the pressure, I was disgusted! The bandage had slid down so that its edge was chafing into the wound.

I cut off the bandage, washed it with saline and applied a figure eight bandage, over a baby's nappy coated with Manuka Honey. Figure 8 bandage stayed in place 24 hours before being changed.
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    09-15-2012, 11:39 PM
  #208
Started
I guess I lucked out in the friends/professionals-with-vast-horse-knowledge department.

Between them and my mom, I have learned so much about taking care of sick and injured horses. I had a filly with a nicked artery just above her coronary band when I was 13 or 14. My mom had just taught me about pressure dressings, and so I applied one. Then I called the vet. By the time he got there, the bleeding had stopped. He said I was doing a good job, gave wound care instructions, and left.

So let me amend that statement. Find a qualified person to learn from. There are some important little facts out there that people often overlook.
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    09-16-2012, 01:35 AM
  #209
Weanling
But you learnt about the pressure bandage from your mum, not the vet - you were really ucky. I trained at a big levery centre in the UK where we were given every opportunity to expand our knowledge in a practicla way - I remember the vet - who was part of the practise that looked after the Queens horses telling us to bandage as we bandage more horses than he did and were far better at it.

And more often than not we are better at bandaging because we put on exercise bandages and tail bandages and then travel wraps far more often than the vet would.
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    09-18-2012, 04:35 AM
  #210
Foal
Thanks for the list it helped!!!!!
     

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