Mare Dragging Back Hooves
 
 

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Mare Dragging Back Hooves

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  • Horse dragging back hooves pain
  • Horses slightly dragging hind legs

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    04-28-2012, 04:01 PM
  #1
Yearling
Unhappy Mare Dragging Back Hooves

Last weekend my friend came to feed and noticed that his mare seemed to be limping/having difficulties walking on her back legs. He immediately took her to his very trusted family vet. It was first suspected that the problem was neurological and an early diagnosis of West Nile was given. She spent 4 days at the vet while they waited for the more definitive blood results to come back. However, when received, she tested negative for West Nile. Since, the vet has not given a specific diagnosis on her condition except to say that it could have been a result of something she consumed.

We have 4 horses on our pasture which have been on this same pasture for over 6 months. The land is private and no one has access to it or them.

My friend has since brought the mare home and the vet suggested a round of oral antibiotics for the next 6 months. It has been about 9 days since her first symptoms, and the mare is still dragging her back hooves slightly and seems to want to give to weight on her back feet, but does not collapse. She does not appear to be in any pain, is eating well, drinking well, and is moving around well.

I am posting to see if anyone has experienced any similar symptoms? I have tried to explain to my best ability, but if someone sees gaps in my description, please say so and I'll try to fill in the blanks.

My friend raised this mare from a weanling now to 6 years. She is very important to him. Her riding regime before her symptoms consisted of some trail riding and roping practice.

Thanks for any insight!
     
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    04-28-2012, 04:11 PM
  #2
Green Broke
EPM? Was that tested for?
     
    04-28-2012, 04:58 PM
  #3
Yearling
He mentioned that the vet brought up EPM, but at the time couldn't remember the exact name to tell me. You suggesting that made me realize what he meant. I read a bit about it, and if the vet brought it up, I can't imagine he didn't test when he sent in her blood. But I suppose it is just like with human blood, just because they test for one thing doesn't mean they'll catch another.

Stand by and I will ask him to elaborate on that suggestion by the vetives and post what additional information he can give me on that. The mare has a checkup Monday at the same vet.
     
    04-29-2012, 05:44 AM
  #4
Foal
Is she showing any other signs of lameness or does it appear like more of a neurological thing? I saw a case of EHV here in the UK and the symptoms were similar, except the horse in question had severe balance problems also. That's to say if you were to tug his tail slightly to the side, he'd almost fall over.

Could she have had some injury to her hocks / stifles that would cause it?

I hope you find the solution quickly x
ThirteenAcres likes this.
     
    04-29-2012, 02:09 PM
  #5
Yearling
GeeGee, no, she is not having balance issues. In fact, while my friend was cleaning her stall, she nosed open the door and went trotting out into the back pasture to graze. Aside from the dragging, she seems to be in absolute perfect health.

The only similar experience I have had is when my playday gelding pulled the tendons in his back legs from walking in deep mud (the vet said). But the vet he uses immediately diagnosed it as neurological. I don't know. It is confusing to me. My instinct says injury based on her doing so well in everything else, but I don't claim to be an expert for sure. I've had pretty good luck with my horses and injuries (knock on wood).
     
    04-29-2012, 02:56 PM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThirteenAcres    
GeeGee, no, she is not having balance issues. In fact, while my friend was cleaning her stall, she nosed open the door and went trotting out into the back pasture to graze. Aside from the dragging, she seems to be in absolute perfect health.

The only similar experience I have had is when my playday gelding pulled the tendons in his back legs from walking in deep mud (the vet said). But the vet he uses immediately diagnosed it as neurological. I don't know. It is confusing to me. My instinct says injury based on her doing so well in everything else, but I don't claim to be an expert for sure. I've had pretty good luck with my horses and injuries (knock on wood).
Did the vet try massaging the back hips and look for tender spots.
Or upon massaging does the horse seem to improve?
So many things can be involved. I totally love my horses chiropractor.
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    04-29-2012, 03:27 PM
  #7
Foal
That's good re the balance then and she sounds like she's happy enough in herself. Does this lad see her often ? Could it be that it's come on gradually ?

Maybe some sort of arthritis attack of the hock, hip or coffin joint? That would explain the action without change of personality...

I do hope you get it sorted or at least answered. X
     
    04-29-2012, 03:33 PM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeeGee Gem    
That's good re the balance then and she sounds like she's happy enough in herself. Does this lad see her often ? Could it be that it's come on gradually ?

Maybe some sort of arthritis attack of the hock, hip or coffin joint? That would explain the action without change of personality...

I do hope you get it sorted or at least answered. X
Yes. In fact, we are both at the barn every day, so it was definitely a shock. It happened while I was out of town. He has a baby goat that has to ne bottle fed early in the morning, and when he arrived to tend to the goat, he noticed that Misty (the mare in question), seemed to be limping. He took her to the vet the same day.

When I returned I had assumed it would appear much worse, but in seeing her, she seems like her normal happy self minus the weird dragging. Still no appetite change and she is very willing to move around. We are hoping for a full recovery. She is an amazing mare with the sweetest personality. She is a barn favorite and has always walked all our vistors around, giving them confidence.

Why does it always happen to the sweetest ones? =(
     
    04-29-2012, 04:03 PM
  #9
Showing
Kissing spines
or spinous process impingement is where the large spines which stick upwards from the vertebrae in the horse's back rub together and cause low

grade inflammatory changes in the edges of the bone where they meet.

Affected horses show signs of poor performance, reluctance to jump, unpredictable behaviour when being ridden and sometimes extreme stiffness.Other symptoms or signs of equine kissing spines are irritability when the girth is tightened or when the horse's back is brushed during grooming, rearing, bucking or bolting.

     
    04-29-2012, 04:04 PM
  #10
Started
Could she be deprived of sleep maybe? They have similar symptoms to neurological diseases-
Is Your Horse Sleep Deprived?
     

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