Mental Disorders In Horses
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Mental Disorders In Horses

This is a discussion on Mental Disorders In Horses within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Mental disabilites in horses
  • Are horses mental confused sometimes

Like Tree4Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    04-03-2012, 12:38 PM
  #1
Weanling
Mental Disorders In Horses

Can horses have mental illnesses? I know a lot of people claim to have "crazy" horses that just don't have proper training. And I'm not claiming my mare is crazy, I just want to understand a little to as why she acts the way she does.

I bought my mare last March as a green broke 6yo. I trained her over the summer and took her to a few local shows where she did great, taking home 1st/2nd/3rd places. I never pushed her past her mental/physical limits. She's a quiet mare, never spooks and completely fearless and tries her hardest to do what I ask her and just loves learning.
She would randomly freak out [rear up, launch forward, overall just complete horrified panic] and I figured it was just her spooking being young and inexperienced. But it's been getting worse and more frequent. She's had the winter off [late December to early March] and I noticed she did the same thing sometimes out in the pasture [she got some funny looks from the other horses :p].
She'll start breathing heavily, then her eye's will bug out and she'll start snorting and looking around like she doesn't know where she is. When I notice her getting upset I try to soothe her and sometimes that'll delay her from going into a complete panic.
I don't know if I'm just being overly worried or if there might be something mentally wrong with her. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Paint pony likes this.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    04-03-2012, 12:44 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Subbing.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    04-03-2012, 02:13 PM
  #3
Started
I would think that mental illness in horses falls under neurological conditions. It is relatively normal for a horse to “have it down” one day and not speak the same language the next. Or to be fine with something and then all of a sudden decide that its scary. But I am interested in what others have to say regarding this. There are plenty of smart horses, not as sharp horses, hot headed horses, dull horses and everything in between.
On a side note we’ve joked about my twenty five year old mare becoming senile in her older age. Molly might need a padded cell soon. She has just started to pick up some real stupid thoughts to run with… she's a stocky little Quarter Horse and just the other day she thought she’d jump the 5’6” fence? Of course that didn’t work and she looked completely embarrassed. We’ve owned her for fourteen years and I have always turned her loose to “mow” the yard, especially now that she is older and could use more grass time. She has taken to running off lately. I let her out and she will run around the yard, over to the field, down the field for about a quarter mile and run back home. Uh? She is also beginning to think that she fits places she actually doesn’t, seems to forget what she was asked mid question, has stood untied to be tacked up for the past ten years but requires being tied now because she’ll forget and walk away, always rode out alone great but lately acts like a clueless four year old who tries to run home. This is a brilliant horse that’s always been treated a little differently because of how smart, sweet and sensible she is but lately…. Sigh.
Curious to hear input on anyone whos noticed an aging horse change. People do, I’ve never looked into it but I guess I have no good reason as to why she wouldn’t be ageing mentally too.
     
    04-03-2012, 02:22 PM
  #4
Foal
At the barn where I take lessons, we used to have a horse who I was always told wasn't completely mentally stable. She was as sweet as could be, but a really nervous at times under saddle. She would always be weaving in her stall. She wasn't a good lesson horse, so she was sold to a place that had gotten a horse from us a few months earlier. These two knew each other, and they ended up turned out together. Ella got super, super attached to the other mare to the point where she wouldn't eat at all when they were apart. She lost a ton of weight in just the first month, so they couldn't keep her. Now she "babysits" weanling thoroughbreds and has been retired from riding and last I heard she's a happy healthy horse :)
But there obviously is something not right in her head.
     
    04-03-2012, 02:58 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by New_image    
I would think that mental illness in horses falls under neurological conditions. It is relatively normal for a horse to “have it down” one day and not speak the same language the next. Or to be fine with something and then all of a sudden decide that its scary. But I am interested in what others have to say regarding this. There are plenty of smart horses, not as sharp horses, hot headed horses, dull horses and everything in between....
Yeah I understand that horses are like that, I've owned horse all my life and most of them were spooky and/or unpredictable and I've ridden/trained young horses before. But with her it's different. I don't really know how to explain it really you'd have to see it, she just forgets where she is, not what she's doing. Like yesterday she was "sleeping" on the cross ties [we have it so the cross ties are hooked with baling twine so if a horse rears/spooks the baling twin breaks] and all of a sudden she reared straight up and launched forward and just kept rearing for 4 or 5 minutes and looked like she had no clue where she was. Not really spooked, just confused and scared. Like I said I can't really explain what happens that greatly.


Quote:
At the barn where I take lessons, we used to have a horse who I was always told wasn't completely mentally stable. She was as sweet as could be, but a really nervous at times under saddle. She would always be weaving in her stall. She wasn't a good lesson horse, so she was sold to a place that had gotten a horse from us a few months earlier. These two knew each other, and they ended up turned out together. Ella got super, super attached to the other mare to the point where she wouldn't eat at all when they were apart. She lost a ton of weight in just the first month, so they couldn't keep her. Now she "babysits" weanling thoroughbreds and has been retired from riding and last I heard she's a happy healthy horse :)
But there obviously is something not right in her head.
I knew a horse that was like that, but she was in her late teens and had been severly abused for most of her life. A friend of mine has an amazing gelding, one of the most gorgeous horses I've seen. But she's the only one that can ride him [for safety reasons] because he has what her vet said was a "mental tick" cause he couldn't find anything physically wrong with him and she's owned him since he was a yearling. He just starts bucking uncontrollably and shakes his head, rubs it like he has a bug in his head [best way I can really explain it]. He has to stay outside all the time because he had an "episode" one night in his stall and almost killed himself. He's 9yo now and retired from showing and is just a pleasure horse now and is getting better with age and supplements and a strict diet.
     
    04-03-2012, 03:04 PM
  #6
Started
We got a mare that went crazy (I think so, anyway). She didn't catch her breeding at the same time as her pasture mate, so we eventually had to separate them when the baby came. I don't honestly know what's wrong with her, but she does the same thing the OP's horse does. Paces the fence, constantly, freaks out at nothing, runs around like an idiot for no reason, and will just generally have a panic attack out of thin air. We thought it was separation anxiety, so after we weaned the foal we were able to put her and her mate back out together, but then she just began driving that mare insane. Not literally, but the little thing would spook and run around and then the other mare would get paranoid because it was wondering what the hell was going on... It's a shame because she's a Zippo daughter that we haven't bred yet, and want to, but are too afraid for the foal. She might abort because of all that imaginary stress. We're still trying to get rid of her as cheaply as possible....

Worst part is my mom wants me to start breaking the broodmares (including her) so we can sell a few. X.x We got her checked out at the vet and she is fine by him, gets fed good food and never puts on weight. I really don't know what I'm going to do when I get on her.
     
    04-03-2012, 03:12 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh vair oh    
We got a mare that went crazy (I think so, anyway). She didn't catch her breeding at the same time as her pasture mate, so we eventually had to separate them when the baby came. I don't honestly know what's wrong with her, but she does the same thing the OP's horse does. Paces the fence, constantly, freaks out at nothing, runs around like an idiot for no reason, and will just generally have a panic attack out of thin air. We thought it was separation anxiety, so after we weaned the foal we were able to put her and her mate back out together, but then she just began driving that mare insane. Not literally, but the little thing would spook and run around and then the other mare would get paranoid because it was wondering what the hell was going on... It's a shame because she's a Zippo daughter that we haven't bred yet, and want to, but are too afraid for the foal. She might abort because of all that imaginary stress. We're still trying to get rid of her as cheaply as possible....

Worst part is my mom wants me to start breaking the broodmares (including her) so we can sell a few. X.x We got her checked out at the vet and she is fine by him, gets fed good food and never puts on weight. I really don't know what I'm going to do when I get on her.
Actually your mare sounds like she's having anticipated separation anxiety. My mare doesn't pace the fence like yours and is actually sane 90% of the time LOL. It's like separation anxiety but she's anticipating being separated. I had a pony that I bought and had to take back because it was so herd bound to the other pony [they were a driving team for years] and I guess the pony would never leave the other pony alone once it got back and would just freak out like your mare.
     
    04-03-2012, 03:14 PM
  #8
Started
I know, but she's been doing this for the past two years... She just stands in the pasture, not eating, staring off into the distance, then runs away and bucks. And she is still freaking out even with the mare with her. X.x
     
    04-03-2012, 03:46 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Yes they can. Worked with a quarter horse gelding like this, He would be fine, then loose it, then fine again. Definitely a mental issue. I've heared something about horses with lyme disease getting like this.
     
    04-03-2012, 04:40 PM
  #10
Weanling
Wow, this is a very interesting topic, and I'm curious about it as well. But why not? Just the simple fact that if animals can have diseases similar to ours at all, why on earth not mental health problems? Now, remember that there are many species out there that don't have certain parts of the brain like us, or have something a little more. Because of these things, animals won't and cannot function anywhere close to us.

A fine example of this is cats. They don't have the frontal lobe like humans, and therefore cannot make a decision as we can - everything a cat does is based completely off of instinct. Period.

I don't know much about the equine brain, but I hope to learn a lot when I start training to be a veterinary assistant (and I'm hoping an equine vet will take me on as a practicing student). I'm going to assume, for the moment, that horses do have the possibility to suffer from mental illnesses, possibly such as anxiety and depression. We all know horses can flare up their instincts and run away from a blade of grass any day, but if I've learned anything from watching groups of horses, one usually doesn't freak out by itself - usually at least one other will stare at the scary thing or flip out as well. And surely we all know depression can reach it's affects on horses. I know my old mare Princess seemed a little less giddy for awhile after my other mare, Goldie, had been given away and moved.

I'll be watching this thread.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Genetic Disorders Survey Stripes Horse Health 0 02-01-2012 02:54 PM
Known Carriers of Genetic Disorders farmpony84 Horse Breeds 0 10-19-2010 04:27 PM
Setting Hidalgo freeee...mental illness and horses. Marecare Horse Training 33 02-09-2010 11:39 PM
Genetic Disorders of the Arabian horses gsarrow Horse Health 0 03-02-2009 09:40 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0