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Mental Disorders In Horses

This is a discussion on Mental Disorders In Horses within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Horse mental dieseases
  • Mental problems in foals

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    04-24-2012, 09:56 PM
  #31
Weanling
Oh my gods, Ripper. Wow, ****, that's the last thing on most people's minds.
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    04-24-2012, 11:29 PM
  #32
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoddard    
Oh my gods, Ripper. Wow, ****, that's the last thing on most people's minds.
I never dreamed my beloved pet would try to kill me.

Vets told me it was not personal.

After I was afraid of the horse......the farrier told me it wasn't worth it to work on his feet.

The vet all did not want to deal with him.

But, the worst part......so many WELL meaning neighbours offered to shoot him.

In the end he was put down bt my vet.
     
    04-25-2012, 12:10 AM
  #33
Weanling
I haven't had time to read through everything but I wanted to share.

I boarded my mare at a horse rescue for a while. They had a gelding there who was definitely ******ed. I don't know what was wrong but I suspect that maybe he had been a dummy foal, deprived of oxygen for too long when he was born, but was just functional enough to live. He was probably pretty lucky to wind up at the rescue.

He would spend the whole day playing with his tongue. Just...playing with it. He'd chew on it, stick it out and generally move it around constantly. He almost acted like he didn't know what it was, like he was confused about why there was such a strange thing in his mouth. I know that some horses will do similar things with their tongues when they have tooth problems but I don't think that was why he acted that way.

He was sweet enough on the few occasions that I tried to pet him through the stall. The barn owners told me that he was an absolute monster to handle, though. They said that he was extremely dangerous and would rear constantly. Hs behavior wasn't necessarily aggressive; he acted like he didn't really know what he was doing. He couldn't be led and it would take hours for him to learn anything. Unfortunately he seemed to completely forget anything that they did manage to teach him by the next day. He lived exclusively in a stall because of his behavior, which might have had something to do with his craziness, but they were fairly good horse trainers. They trained some of the other horses on stall rest without an issue, and retrained problem horses, so I don't think his behavior was simply bad training or management.

He was an interesting horse, that's for sure. I haven't seen anything play with its tongue like that before or since.
     
    04-25-2012, 12:24 AM
  #34
Weanling
Okay, now I've read everything. XD

OP, It must be nerve wracking to not be able to figure out what's going on with your horse. I hope you can find some way to help her soon! Ripper, I think I stopped breathing for a second when I read your story. I just cannot imagine how awful that must have been. I agree with Stoddard, something like that would never even cross my mind.
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    04-25-2012, 08:52 AM
  #35
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ripper    
One winter my stud horse just did not look as good as normal.

Not the gloss he had......he was 14 and retired.

No more horse shows, I never bred many mares with him.

I had the vet tube de-worm him...that is they way I always de-wormed by horses.

We decided if he did not start straiting up the vet would take some blood.

The horse was 15.3 hands and 1300 pounds...at least.

He has won many big western pleasure classes.

I put him out for exercise.

When I called him he had an awful look on his face....that is all I remember.

He went right through three wide 2" boards.

I put my arm over my face...he bit me under the arm...then shook and drug me though the field.

A guy saw it from the road and ran into the field.

The horse let go.....I got 3500 stitches and a few days in intensive care.

When the horse was put down about a month later, it was found he had a brain tumor.

This was the only time the horse bit but, after that day he was never right.

He would for no known reason just flip over bacwards in his stall.
Wow, that's terrible! People around here would just say, "that's a perfect example why you can never trust a stud." And just blame it solely on him being a stud.

I'm glad I know my mare doesn't have one [she's been like this since she was a little baby in case you hadn't read the previous posts].

Quote:
I haven't had time to read through everything but I wanted to share.

I boarded my mare at a horse rescue for a while. They had a gelding there who was definitely ******ed. I don't know what was wrong but I suspect that maybe he had been a dummy foal, deprived of oxygen for too long when he was born, but was just functional enough to live. He was probably pretty lucky to wind up at the rescue.

He would spend the whole day playing with his tongue. Just...playing with it. He'd chew on it, stick it out and generally move it around constantly. He almost acted like he didn't know what it was, like he was confused about why there was such a strange thing in his mouth. I know that some horses will do similar things with their tongues when they have tooth problems but I don't think that was why he acted that way.

He was sweet enough on the few occasions that I tried to pet him through the stall. The barn owners told me that he was an absolute monster to handle, though. They said that he was extremely dangerous and would rear constantly. Hs behavior wasn't necessarily aggressive; he acted like he didn't really know what he was doing. He couldn't be led and it would take hours for him to learn anything. Unfortunately he seemed to completely forget anything that they did manage to teach him by the next day. He lived exclusively in a stall because of his behavior, which might have had something to do with his craziness, but they were fairly good horse trainers. They trained some of the other horses on stall rest without an issue, and retrained problem horses, so I don't think his behavior was simply bad training or management.

He was an interesting horse, that's for sure. I haven't seen anything play with its tongue like that before or since.
He does sound like an autistic human, poor baby.
     
    04-25-2012, 10:36 AM
  #36
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinister    
Wow, that's terrible! People around here would just say, "that's a perfect example why you can never trust a stud." And just blame it solely on him being a stud.

I'm glad I know my mare doesn't have one [she's been like this since she was a little baby in case you hadn't read the previous posts].



He does sound like an autistic human, poor baby.
Yes, around here it was just because he was a stud.

Oh, and it was also according to rumor because I was on my period.

Not true BTW.
     
    04-25-2012, 11:39 AM
  #37
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ripper    
Yes, around here it was just because he was a stud.

Oh, and it was also according to rumor because I was on my period.

Not true BTW.
That's extremely immature.
     
    04-25-2012, 11:45 AM
  #38
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinister    
That's extremely immature.
Yes, just something some people believed to be true.
     
    04-25-2012, 06:29 PM
  #39
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ripper    
Yes, around here it was just because he was a stud.

Oh, and it was also according to rumor because I was on my period.

Not true BTW.
That's stupid, and now it's downright proven to me. Why? Because half of the male horses in the barn I now work at are very studly stallions, and the week I started, I was on my cycle. So, huh. I guess it shows people will look for any reason to blame the horse.
     
    04-25-2012, 10:11 PM
  #40
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohmyitschelle    
Anxiety and depression are DEFINITELY conditions I have personally seen in horses before. My mare has been miserable since losing her gelding friend over a year ago. Whilst she copes with day to day actions, she is dull and yearns for other horsey socialising. We have two other horses on the property that "roam" and visit her from time to time, at least two times a week... and she goes back to normal, but when they leave her, she becomes depressed again. Financially I haven't been able to afford a second horse for her as company, but have recently looked into this for her.

As for anxiety, my gelding (that I sold) suffered from it. He was very sensitive to change. Even if you shifted the water tubs five inches from where they had just been, he'd refuse to drink for hours on end, snort fire at them, run up to them, then realise they still weren't where they had been, freak out, run away over and over until he finally accepted this. He did it with many other things too, except in the saddle - what a relief! He was an apprentice drivers horse (ex racing Standardbred) for 7yrs before I got him, so he had wound himself up and windsucked - though he never latch onto anything, simply twisted his lip to the side and sucked in air whenever he felt uncomfortable. He was healthy as apart from this issue (which had affected his teeth and thus he needed to live on longer grass and supplemented feeding). The anxiety episodes did slow down the longer I owned him, as he became accustomed to having one solid person in his life. But he still did suffer over the most random things... one thing I disliked was rugging him... he'd make SUCH a fuss on some days, on others not even a blink in recognition. Horses eh?!

I'm interested to see what comes of this interesting topic and to the OP, I hope you can get an answer soon... I'm sure it can be very frustrating and worrisome!
My gelding reacts the same way when I take my mare off to rides (we do endurance riding). He gets very depressed and my husband notices he stands in his shelter and won't really eat or drink much. It has always been a bit of a challenge to keep weight on him, but this made it worse. However, we recently rescued a mini horse gelding from a nearby farm. It has made ALL the difference. When I packed up my mare in the trailer today, he didn't even neigh like crazy at the fence. He and the mini just kept right on grazing together, and he was still out there eating when I got home (it's also nice because the mini barely eats any hay compared to my others!).
     

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