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This Miracle Collar is no miracle...

This is a discussion on This Miracle Collar is no miracle... within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Can i turn hirse out with miracle collar
  • Miracle collar crib device

 
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    03-16-2009, 06:55 PM
  #21
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zab    
Skippy; I've gone through a 3 years education/high school on horses and according to them it's just a long-lived myth that the cribbing horse actually swallows air :)
The answer to the cases of colic in cribbers is that cribbing often starts on horses that doesn't get enough food, or by some reason has a problem/pain in their digesting systems, which in turn can cause colic.

I have seen this a few times as well, if only I could pull up some sources...
     
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    03-16-2009, 06:56 PM
  #22
Yearling
When I bought Cocoa at age 5 (she will be 31 yrs old next month) she was already a cribber. I don't know really where it started as she had a few owners before me. But she was already a die hard cribber.

The B/O gave me a nutcracker collar for her and that is what I used for a good many years. Did it stop her from cribbing? Sometimes. But she learned how to rub it on trees and such and get the cracker part up on top of her neck so she could crib. If I tightened it so she couldnt turn it, it gave her sores.

One day I found a new product called the Miracle Collar. She has worn these Miracle Collars ever since. She has never had a sore from it, her forelock has always been small so I can't really say whether it ruined her forelock or not. But it doesnt appear so. She can't turn it as easy as she did with the nutcracker and she very rarely cribs. There are times when I can take the collar off for a week or two before she realizes its off and starts to crib again. For Cocoa, the Miracle Collar has been nothing short of a miracle. She would crib rather than eat if she didnt have a collar on.

To those that think cribbing isnt a health problem, I strongly disagree. I have seen it first hand. My horse has been happier and healthier since I found the Miracle Collar. I am not saying the same collar works for all horses but be careful of the nutcracker collar as well because I have seen horses twist them to the side and get them caught on things and I have seen them give sores as well.

Most cribbers will always be cribbers even if you change the environment they are in. Its a learned bad habit.... not unlike smoking. LOL
     
    03-16-2009, 07:30 PM
  #23
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
Has anyone mentioned looking into his diet, living conditions, or ability to exercise?
Right now he is on a "custom" sweet feed that my barn owner has. He used to be on Purina Strategy. He eats a tim/grass mix all day long. As for the ability to exercise? I'm not really sure what you mean. He is ridden about 4 times a week.

I think he probably developed the habit two owners before me. The girl that sold him to me saw him in a field while passing by one day. He was very skinny (I saw pictures and it was bad) and not taken care of. One day she and her trainer stopped at their house and asked if they could take the horse to a better place. The woman said that it wasn't her horse, it was just in her field. So she did some calling around and eventually she got him to her farm. He got fattened up pretty well and she had started his training process. She had him for a year before I bought him. Before she found him, I have no idea what he had to go through. It makes me so mad that you can just look at a horse everyday and not even think about feeding it or finding it a better home.
     
    03-16-2009, 07:44 PM
  #24
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zab    
Skippy; I've gone through a 3 years education/high school on horses and according to them it's just a long-lived myth that the cribbing horse actually swallows air :)

As I said -some- vets believe cribbing may cause colic because of "swallowing air". And I followed it up by saying that causes of colic can be ambiguous at times.

To elaborate, what I was trying to say is... Some vets/horse people think that cribbing can lead to colic. It is not a fact that cribbing does make a horse colic, nor can it be completely dismissed.. because truthfully, it is pretty much impossible to say it is a myth.. because there may just be that -one- horse out there that does colic because of cribbing.

Quote:
cribbing often starts on horses that doesn't get enough food, or by some reason has a problem/pain in their digesting systems, which in turn can cause colic
And i've never met a horse that started cribbing solely because of poor nutrition. The cribbers i've met started cribbing because of high stress lives and extreme boredom/isolation.

I hope that makes more sense. I tried my best to cover my bases but evidently I failed :p

Sorry to drag the thread off topic guys. I know this thread is about trying to curb a horse's cribbing, but I wanted to make sure I replied to this :p

**Edited to add**

http://www.equi-therapy.net/equi-the...dsucking.shtml
"Crib-biting and windsucking are different variations of the same vice in each case the horse swallows air."

UC Davis Book Of Horses:
http://books.google.com/books?id=bYw...um=1&ct=result
"the horse simply flexes his neck and forcibly swallows air"
(i have more quotes from this, I just don't want to type them out since its a screenshot of the book)
     
    03-17-2009, 01:34 AM
  #25
Yearling
First I wanted to clear up in my earlier post--my horse cribs occasionally WITHOUT the collar. He can not, and will not, crib at all with it. ;)

Let him crib, those collars are torture devices.


Lol. Because letting them wear down their teeth, lose weight, and colic is a better option then letting a collar hang on their neck. If it was a torture device, why does my gelding calmly let me put it on him everyday? The 'nutcracker action' only comes into play when the horse tries to crib. He realizes he can't.. and then the collar does absolutely nothing to him.
Huh.

Skippy; I've gone through a 3 years education/high school on horses and according to them it's just a long-lived myth that the cribbing horse actually swallows air :)
The answer to the cases of colic in cribbers is that cribbing often starts on horses that doesn't get enough food, or by some reason has a problem/pain in their digesting systems, which in turn can cause colic.


No it's not, and I can be one of the people to prove it. My horse colics when he is allowed to crib. We got him the collar, and... hm, that's funny--no colics since!

Like Skippy said, it's impossible to RULE OUT cribbing as a cause of colic.

Some vets say that you don't have to soak beat pulp--and some vets say that you absolutely must. Just because you read it in a few places doesn't make it true--especially when it comes to horses.

;) Went to college for horses, love.

'cribbing often starts on horses that doesn't get enough food, or by some reason has a problem/pain in their digesting systems, which in turn can cause colic'

Very incorrect. They usually start cribbing because of boredom or pain. Usually, a 'stall vice'.
     
    03-17-2009, 05:29 AM
  #26
Yearling
Lets not forget that a horses digestion begins in their mouth. They grind their food to begin breaking it down. If they do not have the ability to properly grind their food in their mouth, they will not get all the benefits and nutrients from what they are eating. It is important to try to stop a horse from cribbing with the use of collars because if not, they will wear their teeth down to a point where they will be in severe trouble at older ages.

They will not be able to maintain weight properly without teeth............

As cruel as collars may look, they are a necessary evil.

Cocoa on her 30th bday with her Miracle Collar on :)
     
    03-17-2009, 02:40 PM
  #27
Zab
Yearling
Skippy; to little food doesn't mean too little nutrition, but too little amount to eat.
Not enough to eat causes boredom and stress in an animal designed to eat 16 hours a day.
And some horses start cribbing because of stomach pains.
And of course there can be other things that stress a horse. :)
     
    03-17-2009, 03:38 PM
  #28
Foal
No offense to y'all, but I don't want this to turn into an argument. I just wanted some advice from others who have success with cribbers... He is not under nourished and he has plenty to eat. I know that it is not a nutrition issue. This is obviously a controversial subject, but still.
Keep the peace guys.
     
    03-17-2009, 03:43 PM
  #29
Weanling
Good suggestion Drake ^^

Have you thought of what you're going to do with him yet?
     
    03-17-2009, 03:52 PM
  #30
Foal
I'm pretty sure that I'm going to try the nutcracker strap. Its much cheaper than most, too!
     

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