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Molasses-How much? Please help!

This is a discussion on Molasses-How much? Please help! within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Will molasses make me gain weight
  • Feeding molasses to horses

 
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    08-10-2010, 02:22 PM
  #31
Foal
Ok, so I'm alittle confused.. yeah it makes sense to me not to feed mollases to a horse. Its just like giving a little kid a few lollypops and saying these will help build your bones strong :) Just my opinion.. it may have nutritional value but sugar is sugar. Good job deciding to kick it out of your horse's diet.

But I was a little confused because sweet feed has mollases in it? So why do major feed companies put mollases in their feed?

And if you want to get rid of the mollases you aren't going to use.. DO NOT THROW IT AWAY! Make cookies.. or pecan pie ;) Why waste?
     
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    08-10-2010, 02:29 PM
  #32
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizpeptig    
But I was a little confused because sweet feed has mollases in it? So why do major feed companies put mollases in their feed?
Because molasses is cheap and makes crappy feed more palatable to horses.

Molasses will help with weight gain, but better alternatives are corn oil, canola oil, beet pulp, flax seed, and rice bran.

Like humans, too much sugar is bad for horses. A little isn't going to hurt them (unless they're IR), but too much is just as bad as feeding a child nothing but ice cream and cookies.
     
    08-10-2010, 04:09 PM
  #33
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizpeptig    

And if you want to get rid of the mollases you aren't going to use.. DO NOT THROW IT AWAY! Make cookies.. or pecan pie ;) Why waste?
If she bought it at the feed store it is not human grade molasses.
     
    08-10-2010, 08:33 PM
  #34
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by horsesroqke    
Why do they sell it in bulk lots if its no good?
Just wondering, and we've brought it now, so i'll just have to use it up
It is actually higher in b vitamins than much else that's in it, but still pretty low. There are also many other healthier options if your horse needs b vitamins. If you want to learn more about balancing the horse's diet & healthy feeding, feedXL.com is a great service.

Depending on the horse, her weight, susceptibility to IR & lami(do you know about that?) it *may* be safe to give her a dollop on occasions as a treat, but as a hcp, I agree with others that it is not a healthy thing to feed a horse. Diets rich in sugar & starch do pretty much the same as this sort of junkfood diet does for people. Diabetic people also often develop bad nails, but horses have to walk on theirs, so the hooves becoming disconnected can become a huge problem, which is largely avoidable by ensuring horses are only fed healthy, low grade diets.

How can you use it up...??

You can use it yourself, in cooking - it's great as an alternative to sugar when making gingerbread or fruit cakes or bread(particularly yummy in rye bread I reckon. It can be used in beer making, to make liquorice, candy, added to tea or fruit smoothies instead of honey.

It is effective at removing surface rust from tools. If you have a rasp or such which has got a bit rusty, drop it in the bucket for a few days, then scrub it with a wire brush before oiling it.

It is a good organic fertiliser for your garden. It is also good in compost, to break down material, particularly fish & bone. It is used to aid mushroom spawning and (apparently!) marijuana flowering.

Used as a hair tonic to darken hair. Supposedly treatment for baldness - rub it in your scalp. A worm treatment when mixed with gunpowder or cabbage.... not sure which of those I'd prefer to try.

Used to stop noisy fan belts. Used to attract bears. As a fuel for cars, a binding agent for coal. An additive for anti-icing to make the product stick to the road. It is used in cement, bricks and plastic.

There are many more uses(some dubious like the worm treatment above!), so it won't be wasted!
     
    08-10-2010, 08:35 PM
  #35
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alwaysbehind    
If she bought it at the feed store it is not human grade molasses.
Processed the same way, just put into different containers!
     
    08-10-2010, 08:54 PM
  #36
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvs2ride1979    
Why do people in Oz like to recommend odd feed additives at infrequent intervals? It doesn't make any sense to me. Someone else from Aus said she and all her friends gave their horses raw eggs twice a week... UGH! What kind of horse advice are you guys getting down there? It all sounds quite ridiculous...
Well after replying without reading other replies, then seeing someone offended by some comment about Aussies, had to go look for the instigator! Firstly I didn't see anything strange suggested by an Aussie, but perhaps the OP being from New Zealand had something to do with it??

And you want strange? ~ I forget where I read it, but sure it was somewhere in cyberspace, was a list of 'traditional' feeds for horses in different countries. I forget most of them, but curried meat was a staple from India. Camels milk and dates was a staple in Saudi or Egypt or some such. Oh and when I was young & silly I used to smoke cigarettes... & my donk & horse enjoyed eating them! I also used to treat my horse & I to sausage rolls when we rode into town!(tho there's precious little meat in those!)

Now I've just got to think of a better argument for convincing my neighbour to stop feeding a heap of bread(his FIL's a baker) to his horse & mini pony! They're both severely laminitic(I don't do their feet) and he reckons the bread's fine because it's organic!
     
    08-12-2010, 09:28 AM
  #37
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Processed the same way, just put into different containers!
Um, no, but good try.

For starters, much of the animal grade molasses is actually made from sugar beets instead of cane sugar. It is more bitter than the molasses made from cane sugar.
     
    08-12-2010, 09:30 AM
  #38
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alwaysbehind    
For starters, much of the animal grade molasses is actually made from sugar beets instead of cane sugar. It is more bitter than the molasses made from cane sugar.
Agreed. Plus, it doesn't have to go through the rigorous testing that human food grade molasses does.

I sure as heck wouldn't use animal grade molasses to make anything I was going to eat.
     

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