Mud Fever - The Horse Forum

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 10 Old 04-14-2013, 12:45 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 117
• Horses: 1
Mud Fever

I believe that my gelding has developed Mud Fever, although it doesn't look bad at all. Yet I'm not 100% sure that it IS Mud Fever, I don't have any pictures currently unfortunately, and I'm not really sure how to describe it but it's not wet and there's no puss under but there were thick scabs that if you were to pull it out it came out with hair.
My first question is.. Can Mud Fever go away on its own? My boy is looking better every day and there is hair growing back, I'm convinced that it's healing.
My next question is, what do you think is one of the most affective ways to treat Mud Fever?
I apologize if I sound like an idiot, I know relatively nothing about Mud Fever except that of what I've read.
JumpingJiminy is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 Old 04-14-2013, 01:19 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Oregon
Posts: 7,426
• Horses: 2
I would imagine that Mud Fever could go away seemingly "on it's own," if conditions were right (some kind of natural vitamin A increase - MF has been linked to low Vit A levels, or some kind of major immune system bump), that that seems sort of unlikely to me. But who knows!!

My mare used to have chronic Mud Fever due to low immune function (she has an auto-immune disease that was undiagnosed for years - once it was diagnosed and we began treating her with natural immune boosting "stuff," she hasn't had a case of Mud Fever since!) and my game plan was always to shave those legs down, keep them really clean and dry, shampoo them once a week with this stuff, dry the legs thoroughly, then liberally spray this stuff all over the skin+scabs on the affected legs, THEN, final step, I would cover each scab with this cream. I'd use the cream twice a day but only use the spray after washing the legs and only shampoo the legs once a week (don't want to dry them out too much by washing them too often).

That worked really pretty well for my mare (I also had a goat get mud fever and this same regimen worked in about a week on her! Haha).
Of course, once I got her immune issues under control, mud fever was a thing of the past but you know.

The other cause of Mud Fever is usually a Vitamin A deficiency. I'm not familiar with how people deal with it that way but there are many people on the forum who are "in the know" that way. In case she doesn't come along, I know 'Trinity' is someone who will know - might be worthwhile to pm her. :)
It's something to do with significantly increasing the Vit A the horse is getting via a dose of some kind of cattle Vitamin A supplement that really bags out the V.A....I don't know. Haha

Good luck! Mud Fever can be frustrating!!

Fabio - 13 year old Arab/QH gelding
Hazel - 14 year old Angora goat

Atticus - 4 year old LaMancha/Alpine cross goat

~
Rest peacefully, Lacey.
Wallaby is offline  
post #3 of 10 Old 08-09-2013, 08:16 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1
• Horses: 0
Hey Jiminy,
My Irish gelding had a bit of Mud Fever in one of her hoofs. I was told it was indeed due to the wet conditions in her paddock. I heard a lot of different advice on how to treat it, but I believe the main thing is to remove the bacteria through washing. My friend tried Nolvasan before rinsing and drying, then I appling a mixture of Desitin. I personally prefer Joveg Mud Fever hoof bath. It's really easy to use and is made form natural products. I think it comes from Germany, but I just make a bucket of water with the soap in it and soak the leg a bit so that the anticeptic gets in all the right places. I then make sure the hoof is dry and keep it bandaged to keep the moisture out. GOOD LUCK!
makie3 is offline  
post #4 of 10 Old 08-09-2013, 08:45 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: England
Posts: 1
• Horses: 0
One of the best ways to stop mud fever at all is to not hose your ponies foot at all because it will help mud get under your horse skin. As for treating your mud fever there are some great cream you can to put on your horses foot.
Hope I helped
hbray99 is offline  
post #5 of 10 Old 08-09-2013, 08:49 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,212
• Horses: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by makie3 View Post
Hey Jiminy,
My Irish gelding had a bit of Mud Fever in one of her hoofs. I was told it was indeed due to the wet conditions in her paddock. I heard a lot of different advice on how to treat it, but I believe the main thing is to remove the bacteria through washing. My friend tried Nolvasan before rinsing and drying, then I appling a mixture of Desitin. I personally prefer Joveg Mud Fever hoof bath. It's really easy to use and is made form natural products. I think it comes from Germany, but I just make a bucket of water with the soap in it and soak the leg a bit so that the anticeptic gets in all the right places. I then make sure the hoof is dry and keep it bandaged to keep the moisture out. GOOD LUCK!
Welcome to the forum..
texasgal is offline  
post #6 of 10 Old 08-09-2013, 08:50 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,212
• Horses: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbray99 View Post
One of the best ways to stop mud fever at all is to not hose your ponies foot at all because it will help mud get under your horse skin. As for treating your mud fever there are some great cream you can to put on your horses foot.
Hope I helped

Welcome to the forum!
texasgal is offline  
post #7 of 10 Old 08-13-2013, 03:31 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Phoenix Arizona
Posts: 4,082
• Horses: 5
Happened to my mare. I washed it everyday with the green Listerine mouth wash. Cleared it right up and inexpensive. Just added a little bit to watered down shampoo.
KigerQueen is online now  
post #8 of 10 Old 08-14-2013, 11:41 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 79
• Horses: 2
When my gelding had it my farrier said to not wash it because it was from wet pastures so it wouldnt help. He recommended either scarlet oil or vasiline and just apply that every day. It would usually clear up in a week or two.
Running Whisper is offline  
post #9 of 10 Old 08-14-2013, 12:58 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 5,286
• Horses: 1
I'd like to add the caveat that rinsing off the mud is helpful if the horse has somewhere to dry off. Last winter we had lots of cases of mud fever at my barn from the muddier-than-usual turnouts. The mud was caked on so thick after turnout that it would stay wet on the horses' legs for several hours (in some cases it was still wet on the innermost layer near the skin the next day when they were turned out again, so it never really dried at all). They started hosing down the legs after bringing the horses in and it helped immensely- since the horses were going into clean, dry stalls, the legs dried off from the hosing pretty quickly and were dry and clean until the next turnout.
verona1016 is offline  
post #10 of 10 Old 08-14-2013, 03:39 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Phoenix Arizona
Posts: 4,082
• Horses: 5
The thing about using the Listerine is that its alcohol so it dries and an antiseptic as well. If you wash it you have to dry it. When my mare had mud fever I was at a loss, but then when my vet tech friend had me try the mouthwash it cleared it up in 3 days.
KigerQueen is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mud fever?? averylilly Horse Health 4 01-18-2013 12:33 PM
Mud fever?? BansheeBabe Horse Health 10 08-30-2011 01:53 AM
mud fever?!? westerncowgurl Horse Trailers 3 08-24-2010 09:19 PM
MUD FEVER (need HELP please!!!!) Jubilee Rose Horse Health 10 08-23-2008 09:25 PM
MUD FEVER SOWERBYGREENE Horse Health 5 04-02-2007 06:10 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome