Mudpie is FAT. - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

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post #21 of 44 Old 02-04-2013, 12:25 PM
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Tons of different slowfeeder ideas. A slowfeeder filled with grass hay( or orchard/timothy( is THE most important thing to keep him healthy, gut-wise, and happy, unless you want to add ulcers to his problems.
You can give him soaked alfalfa pellets and mix his supplements in. That way you do give the benefit of alfalfa but more controlled. For omega supplement I am super pleased with Omega Horseshine. You can cut out the SandClear then too, it'll take care of sand, too.

The importance of having forage available at all times for a horse on stall rest has been mentioned already. What the slowfeeder does is make him eat tiny bites at a time, constantly, much like natural grazing, will also cut down on consumption. It did with mine, they went from 25lbs free choice on the ground, to 15lbs in slowfeeder nets, and next to zero waste. I weighed what goes in and what was leftover and raked together and weighed what was wasted, that's how I'm so sure about the numbers
As for hanging the net, hang it high enough, so, when empty, it is not lower than knee height. Oh, and mine never got stuck in the net. For the first week or so I gave half the ration on the ground, the other half in nets, to counter frustration. But they preferred the nets from day 1
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Last edited by deserthorsewoman; 02-04-2013 at 12:28 PM.
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post #22 of 44 Old 02-04-2013, 05:02 PM
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Chaff is just chopped up hay. Maybe you guys process it more and make it into pellets?
Either way, I'd be finding something along those lines rather than a completed concentrate feed containing fat, to mix the supplements with.
Heck, even a handful of bran with a splash of molasses would be better.

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post #23 of 44 Old 02-04-2013, 06:12 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Endiku View Post
What about mixing his suppliments in a pound or so of Timothy hay pellets?
Ah, thank you! That's exactly what we need! Tractor Supply carries them, and there's one about half an hour away from us. They're priced about the same as the grain I was previously feeding, so my stepfather agreed and said that we could switch him over right away. :)

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Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman View Post
Slow Feeding Horses on Paddock Paradise Tracks - Paddock Paradise Wiki
Tons of different slowfeeder ideas. A slowfeeder filled with grass hay( or orchard/timothy( is THE most important thing to keep him healthy, gut-wise, and happy, unless you want to add ulcers to his problems.
You can give him soaked alfalfa pellets and mix his supplements in. That way you do give the benefit of alfalfa but more controlled. For omega supplement I am super pleased with Omega Horseshine. You can cut out the SandClear then too, it'll take care of sand, too.

The importance of having forage available at all times for a horse on stall rest has been mentioned already. What the slowfeeder does is make him eat tiny bites at a time, constantly, much like natural grazing, will also cut down on consumption. It did with mine, they went from 25lbs free choice on the ground, to 15lbs in slowfeeder nets, and next to zero waste. I weighed what goes in and what was leftover and raked together and weighed what was wasted, that's how I'm so sure about the numbers
As for hanging the net, hang it high enough, so, when empty, it is not lower than knee height. Oh, and mine never got stuck in the net. For the first week or so I gave half the ration on the ground, the other half in nets, to counter frustration. But they preferred the nets from day 1
Thanks, that's a great resource for me! :)

As I'm trying to help him loose weight, should I feed him in limited meals versus giving him free choice, if I were to purchase one of these slow feeders?

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Originally Posted by Kayty View Post
Chaff is just chopped up hay. Maybe you guys process it more and make it into pellets?
Either way, I'd be finding something along those lines rather than a completed concentrate feed containing fat, to mix the supplements with.
Heck, even a handful of bran with a splash of molasses would be better.
I think that's it! :) My stepfather said that he could get some timothy hay pellets on his way back from work sometime this week, so I will be switching him over as soon as possible! That will eliminate the need for a completed feed, which I agree is kind of a counterintuitive idea at this point.

Thanks!

The hills were bathed in moonlight, the shadows not so stark;
Silver light reflected off his brown hide as he held me in the dark
– I love you, Mudpie!
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post #24 of 44 Old 02-04-2013, 06:47 PM
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The funny thing with grass hay in slowfeeder nets is, skinny horses gain and fat horses slim down. Don't ask me why, but it works.
Like I mentioned, give him some hay on the ground or in his usual feeder/ container, until he gets the hang of it with the net. And once he's got it, don't be surprised when he doesn't get excited at feeding time anymore. Strange things happen......
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post #25 of 44 Old 02-04-2013, 10:54 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman View Post
The funny thing with grass hay in slowfeeder nets is, skinny horses gain and fat horses slim down. Don't ask me why, but it works.
Like I mentioned, give him some hay on the ground or in his usual feeder/ container, until he gets the hang of it with the net. And once he's got it, don't be surprised when he doesn't get excited at feeding time anymore. Strange things happen......
That's good to know! I think we can venture to guess that allowing horses to eat the way they were designed to eat does them good. XD I'll work on getting a slow feeder, probably a "Nibble Net." I like the way they're designed the most, I think, and I feel like I'd be comfortable with Mudpie eating out of them long term! As aforementioned, he's really accident prone, and if there's trouble to be had... He will find it!

Once I can get the money and get a hold of a slow feeder, I'll be sure to ease him into it. No frustrated Mudpies!

I attached a picture of him from yesterday, so you can kind of get an idea of what my piggy looks like right now. :)
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The hills were bathed in moonlight, the shadows not so stark;
Silver light reflected off his brown hide as he held me in the dark
– I love you, Mudpie!
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post #26 of 44 Old 02-05-2013, 12:17 AM
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Something else you need to consider is that this horses mental and healing ability is your top priority right now. His weight is important also, but IMO, it is third in line. Mental health and healing come first on stall rest because stall rest is actually pretty stressful for most horses. Loosing weight on top of it with a diet that really limits his chew time would be counterproductive. They arent meant to be confined like that long term and it makes them stress. Some horses have to be sedated and ulcers are common in stall bound horses. I can see you have him on you guard already so I am betting you already know this.

The best thing you could do for him is get him on 100% grass hay in a slow feeder. Alfalfa is going to just add more calories he can't burn off while he is stall bound. If you can't get 100% grass, ask the place you get hay from if they will pick out the bales with the least amount of alfalfa as they see them. I have done that before and had good success. If I got a hunk of alfalfa, I fed it to someone else.

Im glad you are considering the nibble net. I have two and I love them. Best ones out there IMO for stalls and are simple to use and stay where you clip them. They don't sag. Id try my best to give him 24 hour hay in the net so he is chewing and swallowing small bites all day. Its your best natural weapon against ulcers and also will help level out his blood sugar which will help him loose weight also. Saliva is a acid buffer.

He still needs nutrition to heal. If you cut the fortified hard feed, you should replace it with some sort of mineral or balancer appropriate for your forage. I love Triple Crown 30% Supplement with our grass hay. It works well for my area and really compliments our local grasses. I don't have to use any hoof supplements or feed probiotics because its already in the balancer.
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post #27 of 44 Old 02-05-2013, 12:43 AM
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I'd be moving to only pasture hay, with perhaps some white chaff as Kayty said, to keep him thinking he's getting hard feed and to give you something to mix a ration balancer into. You can feed 1.5% of their weight, that's what Brock was getting and he still had a nice layer of fat on him. There's a good chance Mudpie's metabolism slowed considerably when he was underweight (a survival mechanism), and with the current drop in exercise he's just packing on the kilos.

If he can't use a haynet (Brock can't, he rips them apart in frustration and they become a hazard) I'd look at breaking up the biscuit and spreading it across the stable, avoiding his usual pee and muck spots. That way he'll have to work hard to find every little bit of hay (don't worry, those lips are very dexterous!) before his next feed.

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post #28 of 44 Old 02-05-2013, 01:00 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinity3205 View Post
Something else you need to consider is that this horses mental and healing ability is your top priority right now. His weight is important also, but IMO, it is third in line. Mental health and healing come first on stall rest because stall rest is actually pretty stressful for most horses. Loosing weight on top of it with a diet that really limits his chew time would be counterproductive. They arent meant to be confined like that long term and it makes them stress. Some horses have to be sedated and ulcers are common in stall bound horses. I can see you have him on you guard already so I am betting you already know this.

The best thing you could do for him is get him on 100% grass hay in a slow feeder. Alfalfa is going to just add more calories he can't burn off while he is stall bound. If you can't get 100% grass, ask the place you get hay from if they will pick out the bales with the least amount of alfalfa as they see them. I have done that before and had good success. If I got a hunk of alfalfa, I fed it to someone else.

Im glad you are considering the nibble net. I have two and I love them. Best ones out there IMO for stalls and are simple to use and stay where you clip them. They don't sag. Id try my best to give him 24 hour hay in the net so he is chewing and swallowing small bites all day. Its your best natural weapon against ulcers and also will help level out his blood sugar which will help him loose weight also. Saliva is a acid buffer.

He still needs nutrition to heal. If you cut the fortified hard feed, you should replace it with some sort of mineral or balancer appropriate for your forage. I love Triple Crown 30% Supplement with our grass hay. It works well for my area and really compliments our local grasses. I don't have to use any hoof supplements or feed probiotics because its already in the balancer.
I definitely understand the issue with his mental well being. So far I've started him on a calming supplement to help take off the "edge," so he won't be bouncing around on his leg. He also has a jolly ball that I've hung up and a "jolly jumbo lick" that arrived today. I'm easing him off of alfalfa, and on to a grass/alfalfa mix that is primarily grass(the pricing is a big factor in this decision, as straight grass is a lot more expensive). I'm removing the "hard" feed and replacing it with timothy hay pellets.

In addition to these isolated efforts, I take him out of his stall and groom him, and then hand graze him for about 30 minutes a day, if not more. I will be working to purchase the nibble net, which should stretch out his "meal time" significantly. I should be able to work it out to where he'll have hay available all day. I'll be easing him off of alfalfa, as to not make any sudden changes to his diet. I've already started to reduce his concentrated feed in preparation for the timothy hay pellets, which I should be able to get this week.

Mudpie's health – mental and physical – is my top priority.

Mudpie is an intelligent, creative horse that becomes easily bored. Usually, he reacts to his boredom by running around and bucking. He's a horse that needs to be worked every day, or he will go stark raving mad... this is a bit of a problem for us, currently, as one might imagine. Providing him with a slow feeder and grass hay should help with this significantly, as should his new stall toys. He's one of those horses who actually plays with his stall toys, so it is my hope that they will contribute to his entertainment.

I'll definitely look into a ration balancer. I've already provided him a free choice mineral block. He prefers his himalayan salt lick, but does occasionally take interest in his mineral block. :)


Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom View Post
I'd be moving to only pasture hay, with perhaps some white chaff as Kayty said, to keep him thinking he's getting hard feed and to give you something to mix a ration balancer into. You can feed 1.5% of their weight, that's what Brock was getting and he still had a nice layer of fat on him. There's a good chance Mudpie's metabolism slowed considerably when he was underweight (a survival mechanism), and with the current drop in exercise he's just packing on the kilos.

If he can't use a haynet (Brock can't, he rips them apart in frustration and they become a hazard) I'd look at breaking up the biscuit and spreading it across the stable, avoiding his usual pee and muck spots. That way he'll have to work hard to find every little bit of hay (don't worry, those lips are very dexterous!) before his next feed.
Thanks!

The hills were bathed in moonlight, the shadows not so stark;
Silver light reflected off his brown hide as he held me in the dark
– I love you, Mudpie!

Last edited by mudpie; 02-05-2013 at 01:03 AM.
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post #29 of 44 Old 02-05-2013, 01:06 AM
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Sounds like you have got it all covered now :) Worst case also if he gets really...creative lol, you can ask vet about a mild sedative. I hate to do it, but better they recover than buck and rear in place in the stall and re injure themselves lol! Silly horses :) They sure can be creative.

OH! I did clicker train a horse on stall rest once to do little tricks. It really helped his mind. I taught him to touch a target, nod yes and no, bow his head and a few other little things that he was able to do in the confines of his pen.

I wish I could trade you hay LOL We have loads of good grass hay here but good luck getting good alfalfa or alfalfa mix!

Married to my One! 10-11-13 Steampunk style:)

Last edited by Trinity3205; 02-05-2013 at 01:08 AM.
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post #30 of 44 Old 02-05-2013, 01:17 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Trinity3205 View Post
Sounds like you have got it all covered now :) Worst case also if he gets really...creative lol, you can ask vet about a mild sedative. I hate to do it, but better they recover than buck and rear in place in the stall and re injure themselves lol! Silly horses :) They sure can be creative.

OH! I did clicker train a horse on stall rest once to do little tricks. It really helped his mind. I taught him to touch a target, nod yes and no, bow his head and a few other little things that he was able to do in the confines of his pen.

I wish I could trade you hay LOL We have loads of good grass hay here but good luck getting good alfalfa or alfalfa mix!
Eeek! I hope so! I worry about him 24/7... I haven't been sleeping well, have no appetite, and over the past two weeks I've begun to develop an infuriating stutter that, for the life of me, I can do nothing about. >.< I just want him to be healthy and happy and WELL!!

I'll definitely talk to my vet if it gets too bad, but my vet is on the "Oh 24 x 30 outdoor stall? No problem! If it hurts, he won't do it..." train that is neither convincing nor comforting to me. D:

I should totally look into trick training! It would give us something to do for the next ETERNITY. *dramatic cough* That is, besides him pestering me while I clean his stall, which seems to be his favorite pastime. XD <3

And I would trade you ANY day... All the grass hay available here is really low quality and the horses don't really like it much.
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The hills were bathed in moonlight, the shadows not so stark;
Silver light reflected off his brown hide as he held me in the dark
– I love you, Mudpie!

Last edited by mudpie; 02-05-2013 at 01:21 AM.
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