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Mudpie is FAT.

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  • Autologous conditioned plasma when can i start working out agin
  • Equus fiber max

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    02-05-2013, 02:36 AM
  #31
Yearling
I've used a slow feeder before. They worked great for my horses. But my mom's gelding broke the snap on his. He's a little rough on things lol. Considering that your horse is accident prone, you should look into Runners Relief. It's a natural healing thing. Cuts down tendon healing time in half. I've never personally used it (although we might be using it on a rescue mare here soon,) but I haven't been able to find one negative review on this product. I would seriously look into it if I were you. That way your horse wouldn't be in his stall for 4 months, maybe make it 2 months? Like I said, this stuff is supposed to be amazing. I REALLY want to try it. Maybe another member can attest to it's effectiveness?
Runner's Relief Therapy
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    02-05-2013, 03:25 AM
  #32
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Army wife    
I've used a slow feeder before. They worked great for my horses. But my mom's gelding broke the snap on his. He's a little rough on things lol. Considering that your horse is accident prone, you should look into Runners Relief. It's a natural healing thing. Cuts down tendon healing time in half. I've never personally used it (although we might be using it on a rescue mare here soon,) but I haven't been able to find one negative review on this product. I would seriously look into it if I were you. That way your horse wouldn't be in his stall for 4 months, maybe make it 2 months? Like I said, this stuff is supposed to be amazing. I REALLY want to try it. Maybe another member can attest to it's effectiveness?
Runner's Relief Therapy
Mudpie's broken some snaps, ripped some hay bags, destroyed some straps... xD Mostly I just pursue more durable products that I can replace when he's going to be bored. ;)

Wow, that's a really interesting product! I'd love to give it a try! Unfortunately, the ACP treatment (Autologous Conditioned Plasma) cost about $800, and I really can't ask for any more mass amounts of money to be spent on me...

I'm still looking for work, though, so if I can find a way to raise that money, I'll definitely give it a try! :) I'll try anything for my Mudpie! <3
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    02-05-2013, 03:39 AM
  #33
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudpie    
Mudpie's broken some snaps, ripped some hay bags, destroyed some straps... xD Mostly I just pursue more durable products that I can replace when he's going to be bored. ;)

Wow, that's a really interesting product! I'd love to give it a try! Unfortunately, the ACP treatment (Autologous Conditioned Plasma) cost about $800, and I really can't ask for any more mass amounts of money to be spent on me...

I'm still looking for work, though, so if I can find a way to raise that money, I'll definitely give it a try! :) I'll try anything for my Mudpie! <3
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What does the ACP treatment do? I've never heard of it..
     
    02-05-2013, 11:00 AM
  #34
Weanling
I didn't read through all the other posts......but 1% of body weight is not enough for gut good gut mobility ........you should only go as low as 1.5% and that would be considered a diet portion.......the average horse consumes 2% to 3% of his body weight....will depend on the horse.

I know someone that just throws her nibble nets on the floor in the stall......you just have to make sure the tie is tied in such a way that the foot would not get caught in it......but wouldn't do this if the floor was sand only if it was matted in some way.

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    02-05-2013, 11:05 AM
  #35
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Army wife    
What does the ACP treatment do? I've never heard of it..
ACP stands for Autologous Conditioned Plasma... Which is, actually, just that! I'll describe how it went for Mudpie to give you a basic idea of the procedure.

After identifying that it was a suspensory injury, the vet told us our options, and we elected for ACP. They drew Mudpie's blood and put it in a centrifuge, then they took out the yellowish part, the platelets. Meanwhile, they ultrasounded Mudpie's leg, and identified where the tear was. They then injected his leg with something (at this point Mudpie was sedated and I was holding up his head, so I wasn't really focused on the vets), and then injected the plasma directly into the tear.

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    02-05-2013, 11:24 AM
  #36
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudpie    
ACP stands for Autologous Conditioned Plasma... Which is, actually, just that! I'll describe how it went for Mudpie to give you a basic idea of the procedure.

After identifying that it was a suspensory injury, the vet told us our options, and we elected for ACP. They drew Mudpie's blood and put it in a centrifuge, then they took out the yellowish part, the platelets. Meanwhile, they ultrasounded Mudpie's leg, and identified where the tear was. They then injected his leg with something (at this point Mudpie was sedated and I was holding up his head, so I wasn't really focused on the vets), and then injected the plasma directly into the tear.

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Sorry, I accidentally posted it too soon and it wouldn't let me edit; here's the rest of that post:

The cause for success has not been isolated, as it is a fairly "new" procedure, and it's hard to do controlled tests. However, it has been very successful for a lot of people, including a great deal of people in the racing industry. As the tendons/ligaments of the leg get pretty poor blood flow naturally, it could just be a matter of concentrating blood to that area, but no one's really sure.

Because it's autologous (from the same individual that it's administered to) there is a 0% chance that the body will reject it, or react to it. It's a fairly low-risk procedure.

The outcome is that the tendon/ligament might be stronger after it is healed, and it may heal better, reducing the risk of re-injury. There are not guarantees in anything to do with horses or vets, but there's a good chance it will work. :)

ACP is also used on humans, by the way, specifically those with sports injuries. :)
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    02-05-2013, 11:27 AM
  #37
Green Broke
I'd change him to a 10% protein, lower calorie food if it were me, At least while he's in the stall.


He really doesn't need much in the way of grain but I like feeding twice a day myself and understand why you want to do it.

Be careful....if a horse is going to colic, it's usually when they're confined to a stall.

So, cut back on the feed, change to maintenance only feed, and make sure there is plenty of water available.

From the link you provided:


Specifically formulated for premium endurance in performance and maintenance horses

A beet pulp-based feed high in calories, fat & fiber and low in nonstructural carbohydrates (Does not contain corn, barley, or oats). Increases fermentation and decreases digestive problems such as hindgut acidosis in the digestive system of the horse. High fiber and high fat ingredients increase caloric intake without increasing starch. This reduces excitability and heightened awareness allowing for a much cooler horse.


Equus Fiber Max Omega

High-calorie, high-fat, high-fiber, beet pulp-based feed

Specifically formulated for yearlings, broodmares and performance horses
Guaranteed Analysis Crude Protein Not less than 12.0% Crude Fat Not less than 10.0% Crude Fiber Not more than 15.7% Ash Not more than 8.0% Calcium Not less than 0.53% Calcium Not more than 0.93% Phosphorus Not less than 0.42% Vitamin A Not less than 2200.5 iu/lb Selenium Not less than 0.40 ppm Copper Not less than 31.5 ppm Zinc Not less than 95.39 ppm
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    02-05-2013, 11:59 AM
  #38
Trained
Agree with you gunslinger. That is high calorie feed if I ever saw one. Not what he needs right now.
I'd get grass- or alfalfa pellets, or timothy/alfalfa pellets, a couple of handfuls soaked, with his supplements, a vit/min and some flaxseed in one form or another. Per meal. And the slowfeeder always full. Once he's healed, the full slowfeeder can remain, and who knows, the "sick- feed" might be all he needs
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    02-11-2013, 01:44 AM
  #39
Yearling
Update!

I've completely switched Mudpie's diet around, and it is now:

A.M.
9 lbs grass hay
2.5 lbs timothy hay pellets
15 mL Rest Easy Gold

P.M.
9 lbs grass hay
2.5 lbs timothy hay pellets
15 mL Rest Easy Gold
1 scoop Farrier's Formula Double Strength
1 scoop SmartFlex I Maintenance
1 scoop SmartOmega 3
1 scoop U-Gard

Salt source
Himalayan salt lick (free choice)
Red mineral block (free choice)

I haven't yet been able to afford a slow feeder, but he's so far doing okay without it. He always has a bit of hay left over at each feeding time, so I know he's getting enough to last him all day. :)
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    02-11-2013, 06:22 AM
  #40
Trained
Good-oh. I'd just be splitting the supps between feeds too, particularly the omega 3 source.
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