My new horse already seems sore...
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

My new horse already seems sore...

This is a discussion on My new horse already seems sore... within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • My horse was shod 4 days ago and is lame what could it be
  • Already seemed

Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By Cherie

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-29-2012, 01:09 PM
  #1
Foal
My new horse already seems sore...

I have a new horse, only had her for 2 weeks. She vet checked fine (but I did not have xrays done). She has not seems sore at all when I've worked her, and I've only done ground work with her and longed her. She was shod on Friday (3 days ago now) and the farrier said the previous job was not very well done, as she was pretty uneven on the backs of her front hooves. He said he put her in shoes that correctly fit her, and fixed the unevenness as well as he can, and that it will take another round before it's all better. I trust that he's a good farrier, as everyone at my barn uses him and loves him, and they're all very knowledgeable riders and show jumpers. This morning I lunged her in the round pen and she seemed sore in her left front, only going one direction (if I turned her around to go the other direction I couldn't notice it any more). Could this be that she's sore from new shoes or that he tried to correct how uneven she was? Did the vet miss something in the vet check? I bought the horse very far from where I live so I didn't know the vet that did the check. I'm worried, hoping this won't turn into a big problem. I know I should have someone look at her, but there is nothing I can do today since no one was there this morning and now I'm at work. Any input for now would be appreciated.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    10-29-2012, 01:30 PM
  #2
Green Broke
I'm going to guess it's from the recent farrier job, nit ti say he did a bad job. I would need before and after pictures but at least pictures of the feet now.
I had my guy with my last trainer who had used a farrier for along time and suddenly he got foot sore from a trim and had to be out in a softer paddock instead of the gravel ones. Took about a week for him to be not tender and I could fully work him again.
     
    10-29-2012, 01:35 PM
  #3
Super Moderator
Well, it would seem likely connected to the shoeing. It's possible she has an abcess, or just plaing sore from the shoeing. Is there heat in the foot? Is she able to walk up and down hills? If it is an abcess, it will most likely get markedly worse in a short period of time (the lameness, that is) .
What do the others at your barn think?
     
    10-29-2012, 03:57 PM
  #4
Green Broke
Could she have been close nailed? Even the best farrier can close nail a horse once in awhile. Three days after shoes go on is the right time frame for a close nail to show up.
     
    10-29-2012, 04:14 PM
  #5
Super Moderator
Does that mean nailed too close into the laminae? Does that cause an abcess?
     
    10-29-2012, 07:52 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Close nailing means you got the nail too near the sensitive part of the hoof. If a horse has thin hoof walls, it is easy to do. It CAN cause an abscess but usually, if you find the horse lame after 3 days, the solution is to pull the shoe, use hoof testers and make sure there is no abscess and reset the shoe.

I had a horse close nailed a couple of times and pulled the shoe and then reset it myself and all was well.

An aside: I used to shoe my own horses and then started having a farrier after a knee injury. He was a good farrier and because he knew I could take care of putting a lost shoe on and so forth he gave me quite a break on the price of shoes. I rode the horses so much the shoes were worn out by 6 weeks.. and always needed new shoes ($4 extra). Never did any resets other than a lost shoe or close nail. He always shook his head when he saw the shoes and said I was one of the few clients he had that really used their horse.
     
    10-30-2012, 08:08 AM
  #7
Super Moderator
We have our horses shod with SX8s. These are thicker and heavier than most shoes and they are usually worn out and will not reset.

I would say you have a farrier problem and I would call him up and not a Vet -- at least yet.

You can check for a 'hot' nail by holding up the hoof and tapping on each nail head with a small hammer. Do this on the sound foot first so you know what his 'normal' reaction is. Then tap on each nail head and if he jerks more on one, you can have someone pull just that nail out. If it is a hot nail, that will be all that is needed. If the nail comes out 'dry', it was just up against the quick. If it comes out wet and/or smells bad, it has a small abscess pocket. This is doubtful as those horses are usually 3-legged lame.

Other ways your farrier could have sored him up is if he is still one of those that 'soles out' a horse, he could have thinned his sole too much. If he soles out horses, change farriers. We do not let any farrier touch a horses sole with a knife.

He could have changed his angles too much. While he may not have liked his old shoeing job, the horse was sound in his old shoes. You can sore one up by dropping a horse's heels 1 or 2 degrees and straining the deep flexor tendons. You can sore one up by setting the shoes too far out on the toes. We always set shoes back nearly to the white line so the horse breaks over quickly and puts less strain on the flexor tendons. Some even need the toe of the shoe ground down and 'rolled' so the horse can break over even more quickly.

There is a lot more to shoeing a horse than making the feet look good. The horse has to be comfortable with the angles, the break-over and the landing. More horse shoers have crippled horses than accidents.
Elana likes this.
     
    11-01-2012, 01:13 AM
  #8
Foal
Hey guys; thanks for all the info :) my trainer checked her out yesterday (she is very experienced) and found that she has a bruise on the bottom of her left hoof which will probably become an abscess. She treated/packed it for an abscess and we're keeping a close eye on her. The good new is she checked out her legs really good and confirmed that as far as she can see, there's nothing wrong there (thank god). We're going to take it easy and see how it goes; I've let my farrier know as well.
Posted via Mobile Device
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to help a sore backed horse? lilypop1357 Horse Health 6 09-04-2012 12:48 PM
Sore on my Horse's Withers lovebearsall Horse Health 25 04-17-2012 07:29 AM
Horse sore in his loins ScharmLily Horse Health 11 09-11-2011 01:40 PM
Sore horse LoveStory10 Jumping 3 11-09-2009 09:53 AM
sore horse mystery AKPaintLover Horse Health 7 08-02-2007 02:27 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0