Natural Balance Dentistry?
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Natural Balance Dentistry?

This is a discussion on Natural Balance Dentistry? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Anyone use mark powell horse dentist in pa
  • Natural balance dentistry rick samuels

Like Tree4Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    11-17-2011, 08:09 PM
  #1
Started
Natural Balance Dentistry?

My barefoot trimmer just had a clinic at a farm near her from Rick Samuels of Lazy S Equine Services (a level five graduate of Spencer Lafleur). She invited me to come but I had to work, I was wondering if anyone had any experience with this form of equine dentistry? My horse is likely in need of a float, she had one by the vet in july of last year and I'm really considering give him a try. It's very expensive at $175 a float but from what my trimmer says it's worth every penny, at work today I told my mom that's what I wanted for x-mas lol I felt like such a kid asking, but really I was having a hard time thinking of anything when she asked me lol
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    11-17-2011, 09:45 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Not sure about PA, but alot of these people are operating illegally. Basically considered practicing vet without being a vet. A real vet in my area doesnt charge that much, I definetly can't see paying double for someone of questionable ability and legal standing.
     
    11-17-2011, 10:38 PM
  #3
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d    
not sure about PA, but alot of these people are operating illegally. Basically considered practicing vet without being a vet. A real vet in my area doesnt charge that much, I definetly can't see paying double for someone of questionable ability and legal standing.
The only way it could be illegal is if they are sedating animals without a veterinary license. My trimmer is coming out tomorrow so I am going to talk with her more about it, she said she had amazing results with her horse, she said she saw a positive change in her horse after being worked on.
Once I add in the farm call($75) Float($80) and the mandatory sedation($35+) It actually works out to be cheaper, as I don't believe they charge a farm call(but I have to check on that for sure) I also believe they do it without sedation(or else they would legally need a vet). In theory the idea sounds very good and much more in depth then a float from the vet.
There is more info here for those interested Spencer LaFlure | Horse Dentistry Expert And Founder Of Natural Balance Dentistry | Advanced Whole Horse Dentistry
     
    11-17-2011, 10:42 PM
  #4
Banned
Gotta say I only trust a vet in dentistry cases. But not just any vet--only those who have had additional training. There's a specialist around here who only does dental issues. I've seen too many botched jobs...
     
    11-17-2011, 11:06 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Like I said laws in different states vary.
VA laws:
54.1-3813. Registration of equine dental technicians A. As used in this section, "equine dental technician" means an individual who satisfies the criteria established by the Board for registration to perform duties relating to the care and maintenance of equine teeth in accordance with this section and regulations promulgated by the Board. A licensed veterinary technician shall practice in accordance with the requirements of 54.1-3806 and regulations of the Board governing the practice of licensed veterinary technicians.

B. The Board may register a person as an equine dental technician who meets the following criteria: (i) satisfactory evidence that he is of good moral character, (ii) recommendations from at least two licensed veterinarians with practice bases that are at least 50 percent equine, and (iii) evidence that he holds current certification from the International Association of Equine Dentistry or a Board-approved certification program or has satisfactorily completed a Board-approved training program. The Board may register individuals who have not completed a Board-approved training program or do not hold a current certification from the International Association of Equine Dentistry or a Board-approved certification program if they have engaged in acts considered to be those of an equine dental technician as set forth in subsections C and E of this section for at least five years and provide the following: (i) satisfactory evidence of length of time of practice, (ii) recommendations from at least two licensed veterinarians with practice bases that are at least 50 percent equine, and (iii) proof of continued competency satisfactory to the Board.

C. It shall be unlawful for any person not holding a current and valid registration as an equine dental technician or a current and valid license as a veterinarian to perform the following duties:

1. The planing or leveling of equine teeth using nonmotorized hand tools for routine dental maintenance;

2. The planing or leveling of equine teeth using motorized tools performed for routine dental maintenance, or the extraction of wolf teeth premolars including premolars 105, 205, 305 and 405, performed under the direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian where (a) there exists an established client-patient relationship between the veterinarian and the owner, (b) the veterinarian is present, and (c) the veterinarian remains responsible for the sedation of the animal; and

3. Any other task restricted pursuant to regulations promulgated by the Board.

Notwithstanding the foregoing, no equine dental technician shall administer any sedative, tranquilizer, analgesic, prescription medication, or other drug under any circumstances.

D. The provisions of this section shall not prevent or prohibit:

1. Any person from performing tasks related to the practice of equine dentistry under the direct and immediate supervision of a licensed veterinarian or registered equine dental technician during completion of training and experience necessary for registration for a period not to exceed twelve months; or

2. A licensed veterinary technician from planing or leveling equine teeth for routine dental maintenance under the immediate and direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian, provided the licensed veterinary technician has graduated from an American Veterinary Medical Association accredited program with successful completion of coursework in equine dentistry or can document training comparable to that of an equine dental technician.

E. The Board shall promulgate regulations in order to carry out the provisions of this section, which shall include (i) criteria and fees for application and renewal; (ii) requirements for evidence of continued competency for equine dental technicians; and (iii) standards to ensure the health, safety, and welfare of animals treated by equine dental technicians.

Acts 2007, c. 754; Acts 2008, c. 490, eff. March 8, 2008.
     
    11-18-2011, 07:28 AM
  #6
Foal
I can't see how dentistry could be "natural balanced" ...

I think there is only 2 kinds of dental technicians: the good ones and the others.

Just trut your vet to know if the job done is all right or not.
Golden Horse and Annnie31 like this.
     
    11-18-2011, 01:34 PM
  #7
Green Broke
I've never heard of natural balance dentistry- what are they doing differently than a "normal" floating?
     
    11-18-2011, 07:49 PM
  #8
Started
So I talked to Beth(my trimmer) about it today and while there is no way I'd be able to explain it as well as she does, she said they look at the whole horse, not just the teeth and align the TMJ. She said when she had him work on her horse without even looking in his mouth he could tell her the issues she was having with him. She said before he would take about 20 minutes to warm up and start working from behind, had issues picking up the left(i think) lead and popped his left shoulder out when turning . She said after having him work on him he was a completely new horse, he immediately was working from behind and wasn't having issues with his left anymore.
     
    11-19-2011, 04:05 AM
  #9
Foal
I see nothing new in what you tell us : looking at the hole horse and at the mouth is just the way equin dentistry job should always be done.
That's the way it is explained in "equin dentistry" the book each technician should have read before he works on horses.
     
    11-19-2011, 06:49 AM
  #10
Green Broke
TMJ ?
Now its starting to sound like some Deon Warwick hocus pocus.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Natural Balance Shoes/Shoeing COWCHICK77 Horse Health 31 10-24-2011 10:27 PM
What is your opinion on Natural Balance Barefoot Trimming? cloudkisser Horse Health 37 01-25-2011 06:31 PM
Equine Dentistry? Eliz Horse Health 2 09-01-2010 07:10 AM
Natural Balance Shoes KTSpeedhorse Horse Grooming 6 03-14-2009 09:50 AM
natural balance shoeing ( uh what ? ) Easypacer Horse Health 5 09-11-2007 09:57 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0