Navicular Syndrome
   

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Navicular Syndrome

This is a discussion on Navicular Syndrome within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Navicular disease in 22 year old horse
  • Navicular disease horse forum

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    03-15-2012, 06:39 PM
  #1
Foal
Navicular Syndrome

I am beginning to highly suspect that my horse has this. For those of you that have horses or know about this, what has been your experience?
Are you still able to ride? Does the lameness come and go? What are some of the symptoms? Any information or even a web-site to go to would be greatly appreciated. I'm googling some stuff on my own, but I'm also looking for some personal experience.
     
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    03-15-2012, 06:43 PM
  #2
Trained
Please don't be diagnosing the horse over the net anymore than you would yourself. You would call a DR for you, please call the vet for your horse.

I had one with it years ago. At that time I was doing jumping, so it meant that he needed padded shoes, and a home that rode him on the flat. So, I sold him to someone who used him western for another number of years. Some are very manageable.

But, if you really suspect this, and not just that you overworked your horse (yeah, I read your previous thread....) call the vet, get a proper diagnosis so that you can get your guy comfortable and continue trail riding.
     
    03-15-2012, 07:29 PM
  #3
Super Moderator
I think you are going to have to get brave and call a different vet. I know quite a few people that have horses with Navicular believe it or not, depending on the severity, many of them have been riding them for years. They all have special shoes though. I really think you would feel a lot better if you found a new vet though. I know that means you may have to relocate your horse but it sounds like you may be dealing with dishonest people anyway.
     
    03-15-2012, 07:36 PM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by franknbeans    
Please don't be diagnosing the horse over the net anymore than you would yourself. You would call a DR for you, please call the vet for your horse.

I had one with it years ago. At that time I was doing jumping, so it meant that he needed padded shoes, and a home that rode him on the flat. So, I sold him to someone who used him western for another number of years. Some are very manageable.

But, if you really suspect this, and not just that you overworked your horse (yeah, I read your previous thread....) call the vet, get a proper diagnosis so that you can get your guy comfortable and continue trail riding.
I know. I am not going to use the internet as my guide. ;)
The vet will be coming out next week.
I thought that I had just overworked my horse, but things are starting to add up that suggests it is more than that. There is a lot of things that I didn't pay too much attention to (should have!), but when I look at the big picture, something isn't right. I believe that if he does have this; he will be manageable, but probably not for what I had in mind. When the horse was sold to me, it was wrongly believed that I was going to use him to pony my kids around on in the arena and ride once in a while. I don't think she realized that my dream is endurance riding and that I would be riding so frequently.
I will probably be able to continue trail riding, but it will be slow and maybe 1-2 hour rides. I guess we will see the vet thinks.
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    03-15-2012, 07:50 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by farmpony84    
I think you are going to have to get brave and call a different vet. I know quite a few people that have horses with Navicular believe it or not, depending on the severity, many of them have been riding them for years. They all have special shoes though. I really think you would feel a lot better if you found a new vet though. I know that means you may have to relocate your horse but it sounds like you may be dealing with dishonest people anyway.
Unfortunately, you are spot on. He already has pads on the front feet. He is lame without them. There was a whole other story for the reason behind that. :( I don't think that was a true story either.
What will probably end up happening is that I will have to move him. As much as I love the surrounding area, it's not going to be worth it.

He's been given "supplements" for his feet and she told me that sometimes he walks around a little stiffly and that we should just keep and eye on him. When I asked who would be in charge while she was gone, she told me to e-mail her with any issues and that she wanted to be the only one dealing with this. (?) She didn't tell me about the pain he was in until after I called her and told her that I saw him. She asked if I had a hard ride. When I explained that he tripped and hit his knee, she said that I rode my horse way to hard and that was the reason for the pain. When vet said all swelling was down in knee, it didn't make sense that he was still hurting so much and needing so much bute. She is treating him herself and not based off the vet. Due to her 50 plus years in horses, I trusted her judgement, but the fact that they were treating him and not telling me, leads to believe that there is something else going on- besides a hard ride.

I'm the trusting kind of person that likes to believe that best, but I also have good instincts. The problem is that sometimes I ignore those instincts in the quest of seeking out the good. Ugh.
     
    03-15-2012, 08:59 PM
  #6
Weanling
One of ours has really bad Navicular. She's been getting progressively worse, and now is in constant pain, and it will never get better.
We're wrestling with the question of what do we do in her best interests?
At what point is it more cruel to allow her to suffer, than it is to let her be a pasture pet?
This is a horse that is so well trained, she can be ridden bareback without a halter or bridle, gentle as can be, and an attention hound.
Our hearts are breaking as we procrastinate on making a decision, but alas, it is one that must be made, and soon.
We've tried hoof care, special shoes, and a variety of other things to help her along, all to no avail of relief for her.
And, she's only 12 years old.
     
    03-15-2012, 11:06 PM
  #7
Trained
Hi,

IME&O 'navicular' is a very common problem & can generally be helped or rehabbed with the right management. Basically the 'syndrome' is heel pain without other obvious cause and the 'disease' also involves bony changes to the navicular bone & P3.

Conventional methods of relief - pads, further removing the heels from use with high heels, etc are palliative and generally rather temporary. However, other approaches can truly rehabilitate these horses generally. Even in case of bone degeneration/remodelling, whether or not the bone is able to change back, the horse can still be made sound. Check out hoofrehab.com for some good info on what can be done. Also look up Dr Bowker & his 'good & bad foot morphology' paper.
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    03-16-2012, 02:37 PM
  #8
Foal
Update-

Well, he is 100% back to normal now. I'm hoping that it really was just an overworked soreness, plus the bang to the knee, and the shots that had him down so badly.
There are still things that don't add up, but I'm just going to be watching him very carefully, taking it easy, and of course getting the vets opinion.
Would it be hard on a horse's hooves if he wasn't trimmed or shod in a year/years, but he didn't do any work? I've been told that the reason his feet were so bad when he was first brought to the ranch was because they hadn't had anything done to them. He just stood around all the time at this place- no work at all - nor any food. I was just curious to see if this could be part of our issues. Thanks!
     
    03-16-2012, 06:31 PM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newby32    
Would it be hard on a horse's hooves if he wasn't trimmed or shod in a year/years, but he didn't do any work? I've been told that the reason his feet were so bad when he was first brought to the ranch was because they hadn't had anything done to them. He just stood around all the time at this place- no work at all - nor any food. I was just curious to see if this could be part of our issues. Thanks!
Yes, most definitely & chances are, if he's had so little exercise/work, particularly if he's lived in a 'nice' cushy paddock, his heels are indeed likely to be weak - if you don't use it, you lose it.... or fail to develop it in the first place. That paper I mentioned by Dr Bowker is on precisely that subject. Combined with hooves being neglected, which likely added stress in other areas, they'd likely take a fair bit of time & effort to get into decent shape. But yes, generally you can 'fix' it.

I would also be thinking he'd need some protection for his feet, to allow him to *comfortably* use his heels correctly & therefore begin developing some strength. I'd probably work him in hoof boots with frog support pads for a while at least. Proper movement - & therefore comfort to be able to do it - is very important, as he needs to be able to land heel first, both to develop strength in his caudal foot and also it seems that it's the toe-first landings that put the most strain on the navicular region & cause the most damage there, not to mention on the laminae, lower pastern & other joints... Well worth looking into the subject & getting proactive to avoid any serious issues.
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    03-16-2012, 06:38 PM
  #10
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by azwantapaint    
One of ours has really bad Navicular. She's been getting progressively worse, and now is in constant pain, and it will never get better.
We're wrestling with the question of what do we do in her best interests?
At what point is it more cruel to allow her to suffer, than it is to let her be a pasture pet?
This is a horse that is so well trained, she can be ridden bareback without a halter or bridle, gentle as can be, and an attention hound.
Our hearts are breaking as we procrastinate on making a decision, but alas, it is one that must be made, and soon.
We've tried hoof care, special shoes, and a variety of other things to help her along, all to no avail of relief for her.
And, she's only 12 years old.
Best of luck to you in such a difficult decision - I can imagine you're going through a lot of pain yourself....
     

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