Need HELP tonight-eye injury-Gross photos - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Need HELP tonight-eye injury-Gross photos

This is a discussion on Need HELP tonight-eye injury-Gross photos within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        05-02-2011, 09:30 AM
      #21
    Super Moderator
    It can be sutured and should be as soon as possible. Keep it moist until you can get it done.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        05-02-2011, 10:35 AM
      #22
    Banned
    Glad the vet is coming out this morning.


    Yes, this is a perfect example of why people need to have a relationship with their vet. There are lots of vets who will not provide after hour care (which can get very pricey) to people who are not actual clients of theirs.
         
        05-02-2011, 11:01 AM
      #23
    Banned
    How is he doing now? Has the vet seen him yet? Do you know how it happened?


    As for necessary items, it depends on the person, but things we find necessary:

    A stethoscope (to listen for gut sounds to check for colic)

    Blood stopping powder

    Betadine or some other wound cleanser

    Epsom salts or some other soaking agent for hoof abscesses

    SWAT ointment is a MUST for wounds during the fly season

    a bottle of vegetable oil and a turkey baster (Sounds weird, but it saved our gray TBs life. He's a choker, gulps his food, choked badly on hay one morning. He was in severe distress. Shot some vegetable oil in his mouth with a turkey baster and he was able to swallow the blockage)

    Tweezers to remove ticks

    ALWAYS provide salt/mineral licks or blocks. We buy the Himalayan salt licks because our horses won't touch the other, flavored ones. Salt licks are important even in the winter, but now that summer is approaching, they are even more necessary.


    Also, our horses get a daily probiotic supplement but it's always good to buy probiotic cookies for use when diarrhea or loose bowels occur.


    I want to take a moment to commend you for your diligence in learning how to care for your horse. So many owners don't, sadly.
         
        05-02-2011, 11:10 AM
      #24
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Beauseant    

    a bottle of vegetable oil and a turkey baster (Sounds weird, but it saved our gray TBs life. He's a choker, gulps his food, choked badly on hay one morning. He was in severe distress. Shot some vegetable oil in his mouth with a turkey baster and he was able to swallow the blockage)
    Please do not shoot things down your horses throat when they are suffering from choke. It is a really good way to make them aspirate whatever you are shooting in there thinking you are helping. Choke in a horse is not like a human choking. They can breath.
    If your horse is distressed, call the vet and have them deal with it. Some things should not be handled by a person who does not have training.
         
        05-02-2011, 11:24 AM
      #25
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Alwaysbehind    
    Please do not shoot things down your horses throat when they are suffering from choke. It is a really good way to make them aspirate whatever you are shooting in there thinking you are helping. Choke in a horse is not like a human choking. They can breath.
    If your horse is distressed, call the vet and have them deal with it. Some things should not be handled by a person who does not have training.

    I didn't say I shot anything down his throat. I said I shot it in his mouth(about three TBS full) and he was able to swallow it to where the blockage was located in his throat. There was no time for a vet to come. He was in alot of distress.....waitin hours for a vet was not viable. He was in alot of pain, kicking at himself and throwing his head wildly and thrashing. He was unable to eat or drink enough water to dislodge the blockage...he did try. He became frantic.

    EVERY horse owner should be prepared that there will be times when waiting for a vet is not an option....IMO, this was one of those times. The vegetable oil in his mouth, to specify, felt slimey, causing him to swallow it, which coated the chewed hay blockage to where it passed safely ....

    AND FYI, this tip was given me BY MY VET himself, as he was aware of this horse's tendency to choke and also aware that he was not able to appear at the drop of a hat to do it himself. Sure,, his method of handling choke is not as primitive as a turkey baster and oil, but it is, in essence, the same methodology.
         
        05-02-2011, 11:31 AM
      #26
    Green Broke
    So sad the vet wouldn't come, I would be freaking out. Any news????????
         
        05-02-2011, 11:33 AM
      #27
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Beauseant    

    AND FYI, this tip was given me BY MY VET himself, as he was aware of this horse's tendency to choke and also aware that he was not able to appear at the drop of a hat to do it himself. Sure,, his method of handling choke is not as primitive as a turkey baster and oil, but it is, in essence, the same methodology.
    And he has the experience to know where he put the tube so he is not squirting things into the horse's lungs.

    There is a huge difference between a horse owner, with a history with their vet, calling their vet with an issue and the vet giving them advice on how to rectify it than someone on the internet suggesting a very novice horse owner do the same thing as SOP.

    I stand by my advice that people should not, as general practice, squirt things into their horse in an attempt to resolve a choke.


    Back to the OP's horse. Did the vet get it all fixed up?
         
        05-02-2011, 11:36 AM
      #28
    Green Broke
    Please don't put anything in or near an eye not made for eyes. Eyes don't follow the same rules as other body parts.
    As you're a new horse owner I have this advice for you. Get a little aggressive/demanding when you need vet care. Some vets wrongly believe that a person new to horses doesn't know anything & they think they may be being called out for a scratch.
    I hope everything works out well for your horse.
         
        05-02-2011, 11:36 AM
      #29
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Beauseant    
    I didn't say I shot anything down his throat. I said I shot it in his mouth(about three TBS full) and he was able to swallow it to where the blockage was located in his throat. There was no time for a vet to come. He was in alot of distress.....waitin hours for a vet was not viable. He was in alot of pain, kicking at himself and throwing his head wildly and thrashing. He was unable to eat or drink enough water to dislodge the blockage...he did try. He became frantic.

    EVERY horse owner should be prepared that there will be times when waiting for a vet is not an option....IMO, this was one of those times. The vegetable oil in his mouth, to specify, felt slimey, causing him to swallow it, which coated the chewed hay blockage to where it passed safely ....

    AND FYI, this tip was given me BY MY VET himself, as he was aware of this horse's tendency to choke and also aware that he was not able to appear at the drop of a hat to do it himself. Sure,, his method of handling choke is not as primitive as a turkey baster and oil, but it is, in essence, the same methodology.
    In all my years as a BO and a vet tech, never ONCE have I heard or witnessed this. I would highly advise owners to NOT do this.
         
        05-02-2011, 11:38 AM
      #30
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by natisha    
    Get a little aggressive/demanding when you need vet care. Some vets wrongly believe that a person new to horses doesn't know anything & they think they may be being called out for a scratch.
    I hope everything works out well for your horse.
    Great point!

    The other thing that might help next time is stating that you realize there are extra fees for emergency calls and you will pay with a good check or credit card (which ever they prefer) while the vet is there.

    They really have no idea who is calling them when you are not a client.
         

    Tags
    laceration, torn eyelid

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Gross-not for the squemish stomachs. Gidget Horse Videos 43 02-09-2011 11:11 PM
    Biggest bean my vet has seen!!! picture*Gross* Buckcherry Horse Health 26 12-30-2010 05:11 PM
    Warning - this thread is gross! CloudsMystique Horse Health 25 03-01-2010 07:19 PM
    Update on Denny's leg! (warning, gross photos) JustDressageIt Horse Health 26 04-28-2009 06:42 PM
    Shoulder/Back injury stemming from leg injury Andi Horse Health 1 02-18-2009 05:17 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:54 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0