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Need help with weight gain and cribbing

This is a discussion on Need help with weight gain and cribbing within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        12-26-2007, 03:53 PM
      #21
    Yearling
    Thank you very much. I will consult my vet about that, thank you very much for your help.
         
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        12-27-2007, 02:46 PM
      #22
    Yearling
    I am sad to hear that the Miracle Collar doesnt work for your horse. Its the only thing that works for mine. Just as a reminder, remember its the front buckle (the one that goes above their eyes) that applies the pressure to stop the cribbing, so you want that one on the tighter side.

    As for feeding, definitely try some rice bran & soaked alfalpha cubes - soak them for about 30 minutes so they are nice and mushy... add then to the horses normal grain/feed twice a day.

    Cheers,
    Kim
         
        12-27-2007, 05:19 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    When my trianer got her TB off the track she was disgustingly thin! We put her on
    -1 cup of corn oil every day
    - beet pulp at night
    - 2 scoops of soy
    - pelleted complete feed
    - 1 scoop of alfalfa(spelling?) squares
    - 20 hours of turnout time (4 hours for riding/brushing/eating)
    It worked quite well too. The corn oil added more fat and made her shiny. The beet pulp added weight all over and the soy built up her back/topline. The alfafa also added weight and energy. The 20 hours of turnout gave her endless amounts of roughage and play time.

    For cribbing I found this website, I hope it helps..
    http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/petcolumns/s...cle.cfm?id=134

    Let us know if you find anything that works
         
        12-30-2007, 06:57 PM
      #24
    Yearling
    http://www.bitterlicks.com/
    ^^My friend use to have a cribber and stumbled upon this, but she sold the horse before she ordered it, I don't know anyone who has actually used this, but the website looks quite impressive and I think it might be worth a try.
         
        12-30-2007, 09:30 PM
      #25
    Foal
    cribbing and weight gain

    Hi There, just wanted to add this to the already posted replies you have received. It is from "Veterinary Elements". Just something else to consider if you havent already
    " The stockman is seldom worried with tooth troubles in sheep,cattle and pigs, and unless well informed is apt to think horses are just as free, such, however, is not the case. The slightest irregularity of the teeth will interfere more or less with chewing and masticating the food, quite readily understood if a person is familiar with the arrangement of the teeth. No horse is exempt, from colthood to old age the teeth are liable to need attention.
    There are general symptoms, such as unthriftiness, often in spite of good and liberal feeding and little work, there is dribbling of saliva from the mouth,ends of hay may be dropped from the mouth, water is let fall out when drinking, the horse may crib or windsuck, the feces may contain undigested feed, there may be swelling of the jaw, loss of flesh; the horse may pull on the bit or refuse to take hold at all........the cause is the teeth"
    I thought I would share this with you. I have seen horses self mutilate( chew wire, t-posts, etc) themselves trying to get relief from discomforts caused by teeth. I am not saying this is what could be the problem, but it might help. :)
         
        01-06-2008, 11:49 PM
      #26
    Foal
    Update on my horse

    I thought I would let yall know that I went and bought the beet pulp. I also am slowly switching her from the sweet feed to pellets and I am also giving her corn oil as suggested. I am giving her a bale of hay everyday, but I still need to buy the alfafa cubes. I had to buy 20 bales of hay to stock up for when the feed store runs out, so I had to wait for the cubes. I am on disability so I have to make sure I have money for all the feed I buy for the month. I have 10 dogs that eat 60 lbs every 3 days, and 7 cats to feed as well. My Mastiff eats more than my horse! Lol I also figured out that my horse likes to share her food with the Blue Heeler, but she refuses to share with the Mastiff! I think it's funny to watch the horse chase off one dog but lets the other eat with her. Anyways, I am already seeing a difference in her weight and she loves the beet pulp! Thank you all and I will keep you updated on her progress!!!
         
        09-17-2013, 07:01 PM
      #27
    Foal
    My horse is cribbing also. I read that it's because he is bored or he needs to interact with other horses. But we have two other horses so I don't think that's the case. But I read in a book at tractor supply that he fills up from the air so he doesn't eat much and it causes weight loss. Also, the feed could cause the "cribbing" and / or stress. We tried to put him in our yard so he will eat more and he does just fine but when he is with the other horses he will just stand there and crib on anything he can. So I think it's stress. If you can try letting him around another horse and see if that helps. Good luck ! :) and they also make " cribbing spray" it's at tractor supply.
         
        09-17-2013, 07:39 PM
      #28
    Teen Forum Moderator
    Ten to one, your horse is lonely and extremely bored in her stall. She's the only horse on the property right?

    I have a coming two year old TB filly who came from a terrible situation as well; where she was severely neglected. It has been about 9 1/2 months since she was in that situation so her body has mostly healed, but she has been TERRIBLE about cribbing/windsucking. She would do in on anything and everything. Wire fencing, t-post caps, wood, metal, plastic, trees, feed buckets...there was no way to make it where there was nothing for her to crib on, and she was making her mouth RAW from doing it so much. I, of course, had her checked for ulcers and she had none (surprisingly...) so when that was ruled out I decided it was her environment that was causing her to crib. At that time she had to stay in a 14 x 20 panel stall with a small run, much like your mare- due to a severe injury and illness- and she literally cribbed all day. Once she was healed up nicely though, I moved her to a 2 acre pasture with a bit of grass in it by herself. Her cribbing decreased, but it was still significant. So then I decided to modify her diet. She had been on a large amount (4.5 lbs) of grain (not sweet feed, she ate Nutrena Mare and Foal) so I slowly decreased that to 2.5 lbs of grain and added in beet pulp. The cribbing decreased again, but she still cribbed.

    Just this past two months, she has finally been integrated into a herd situation slowly...one horse at a time, and she now stays in a herd of 5 and is free fed hay off of a round bale. She eats half a pound of rice bran (I traded that out for beet pulp because she wouldn't eat it), 6 lbs of alfalfa pellets, as much costal hay as she wants, and a powdered probiotic...and I've seen a HUGE change. Now that she is able to be with other horses her cribbing has all but disappeared. I think I've only seen her do it once (while separated) in the whole time since integrating her into the herd, and she's put on weight as well. She just needed companions. She felt very anxious without them and resorted to the endorphins released by cribbing to make her feel better, but as soon as she was with them she didn't feel like she needed to worry any more, and she's doing great.

    Horses aren't meant to be without other horses, and they aren't meant to only have a stall and small pen to walk around in. They are social animals, and will litereally drive themselves crazy without herd mates.
         

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