Need shoeing help
 
 

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Need shoeing help

This is a discussion on Need shoeing help within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Is breakover important in horse shoeing?
  • Can shoeing horse improve short stride

 
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    01-24-2011, 04:23 PM
  #1
Trained
Need shoeing help

For a horse with an upright shoulder, short pasterns and a naturally very short stride, what would you recommend in terms of breakover for shoeing? I don't completely understand breakover. On our last shoeing, while I liked the angle of the foot, he set the shoe back a good inch or so and shaved off the front of the foot to match the shoe. I'm thinking it actually impeded my horses already short stride instead of help it, but I'm really not sure. Any farriers on this site? We're due for new shoes this week.
     
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    01-24-2011, 07:46 PM
  #2
Foal
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    01-24-2011, 07:46 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
For a horse with an upright shoulder, short pasterns and a naturally very short stride, what would you recommend in terms of breakover for shoeing? I don't completely understand breakover. On our last shoeing, while I liked the angle of the foot, he set the shoe back a good inch or so and shaved off the front of the foot to match the shoe. I'm thinking it actually impeded my horses already short stride instead of help it, but I'm really not sure. Any farriers on this site? We're due for new shoes this week.
pics?
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    01-24-2011, 08:09 PM
  #4
Trained
I don't have any conformation shots and he's at 8 weeks, so I don't have pics of his feet that would do any good. Here's a pic that shoes his short stride in back. That's about all I have. He is a bit straight behind in addition to his upright shoulder and short pasterns. I definitely didn't buy a dressage star! He can step under himself, but it takes a lot for him to do it. Anything I can do to optimize the way he moves will be worth it.
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    01-24-2011, 09:27 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by y wolf    
pics?
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pretty hard to give advice without good pics. Short and upright do not normally need help with break over and I feel proper shoeing involves shaping a shoe to a foot not a foot to a shoe. What shoe did they use? Can you see white line at the toe ?did he give a reason for the set back?
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    01-24-2011, 09:36 PM
  #6
Trained
This was a farrier switch. The previous farrier had been letting the toes get longer and longer to where I was afraid it would put stress on his legs. One one foot, the toe was twice as long as the apex of the frog. I understand it is only supposed to be 1/3 longer?

We're doing shoes on Friday. I'll take a look when he takes the shoes off. It did make me nervous seeing how much he took off. I am concerned the white line was compromised a bit. He did not give a reason for the setback. I'm just assuming it was to shorten the toes and bring the angle back into line.

This farrier stuff is very frustrating. Between a few barn switches and a few bad shoeing jobs, this is my 5th farrier. Everyone does it differently. It's really mind blowing how they all justify their way of doing things as the correct way. Ideally I would like to have him shape the foot first and then put the shoe on, but I don't want to step on the guy's toes. In the whole grand scheme of things. I really don't think I've ever noticed a big difference in the way my horse moves no matter how he's trimmed.
     
    01-24-2011, 11:21 PM
  #7
Foal
Western horsemen put out a good book on shoeing might be worth your time to look at it. Every farrier dose things a little different but the basics are all the same good shoeing is the same every where. As your horses caretaker its your responsibility to speak up on its behalf. Educate yourself in recognising good work. Ask him why he's doing what he is doing. And what ever you do don't let some one do something that you feel will harm your horse. Most guys don't mind answering questions some enjoy teaching.It is ok to tell them what you want you pay the bill. Do it tactful and you may get better care. Being a know it all may cost you a farrier but knowing enough will probably improve your horses life. Post picks after his next visit.
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    01-25-2011, 12:11 PM
  #8
Weanling
I would post your question on the Farrier & Hoofcare Resource forum at horseshoes.com. Some of the people on there are jerks, but if you can ignore them there's plenty of helpful and VERY knowledgeable folks on there.

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I would post in the section titled "Farriers Helping Horse Owners with Shoeing and Trimming Problems".
     
    01-25-2011, 03:25 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by RebeccaMI    
I would post your question on the Farrier & Hoofcare Resource forum at horseshoes.com. Some of the people on there are jerks, but if you can ignore them there's plenty of helpful and VERY knowledgeable folks on there.

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I would post in the section titled "Farriers Helping Horse Owners with Shoeing and Trimming Problems".
good link but they will need pics too. Take from. Front. Side. Back. And a pic of sole. Also helps to have pic of hole horse squared up.
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    01-25-2011, 05:30 PM
  #10
Trained
Thanks guys. I'll take some pics Friday and repost. I will ask him why he's doing the setback.
     

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