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Need some healing prayers for my boy Red (some graphic photos -- beware!)

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        02-07-2013, 02:41 PM
      #41
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by beau159    
    Ah man, you too?



    Maybe we should start a "my horse is on stall rest" thread, lol.
    Can I join? ;)
    My guy is on month 5 of stall rest so far...with about 2 months more to go. He's just like your guy - high energy and veryyy bored! Ughhh the horror!

    Sending big healing vibes to you and Red, it's amazing how much they can heal with care, love and a great vet haha. Looks like you're on the right path, if your having trouble with bandaging try Elastopast - it's just like vet wrap but sticky on both sides and is AMAZING in keeping leg bandages in place! I've used it for Robbie's injury and it's been wonderful!

    Also, I was going to comment about not cold hosing the wound anymore - does more harm then good! I stayed veryyyy far away from cold hosing or even rinsing with Robbie's wound. If I (or the vets) needed to clean it, we would use sailene.
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        02-07-2013, 02:47 PM
      #42
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by blush    

    Also, I was going to comment about not cold hosing the wound anymore - does more harm then good!

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    I'm glad that I had not done any cold hosing on him at all, except one day when it had gotten dirty (because my bandage fell down) and we wanted to wash it off. With it being winter and often below zero air temps, it wasn't feasible to do that.

    Now if it had been in the summer, I probably would have been cold hosing it because the original "on-call" vet I worked with told me over the phone a week after the incident that when I eventually get to the point where I'll stop bandaging it, I may have to wash it when it gets dirty, and that cold hosing would be a good idea. Well now, after him apparently wrapping the wound incorrectly, and telling me incorrectly I could cold hose it later, .... this is really, really making me doubt this vet. Good thing I plan to never use him again! (unless an emergency forces me)


    Now, what did YOUR horse do Blush?
         
        02-07-2013, 03:01 PM
      #43
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by beau159    
    I'm glad that I had not done any cold hosing on him at all, except one day when it had gotten dirty (because my bandage fell down) and we wanted to wash it off. With it being winter and often below zero air temps, it wasn't feasible to do that.

    Now if it had been in the summer, I probably would have been cold hosing it because the original "on-call" vet I worked with told me over the phone a week after the incident that when I eventually get to the point where I'll stop bandaging it, I may have to wash it when it gets dirty, and that cold hosing would be a good idea. Well now, after him apparently wrapping the wound incorrectly, and telling me incorrectly I could cold hose it later, .... this is really, really making me doubt this vet. Good thing I plan to never use him again! (unless an emergency forces me)


    Now, what did YOUR horse do Blush?
    Good to hear! You seem to be taking wonderful care of your guy - I hope to be reading about a happy ending soon. :)
    Yeah, I was told that any washing with water is not good. If there is nothing else to use, water is do-able but not ideal. Cold, warm, or hot...water will promote proud flesh. :( I understand sometimes we need to use it, just try and use water sparingly haha!

    Um, I'd be seriously doubting your original vet. Sounds like they were kinda doing a lazy (and incorrect haha) job! No vet in their right mind would tell you to keep or start cold hosing after such a traumatic injury. Also, if it were me - I would not stop bandaging the wound until there is skin (with hair growing on it) covering the cut. Especially if he's outside I wouldn't want to take the chance of getting something in there and causing infection. ;)


    Ughhh, well my horse (Robbie) sliced open his fetlock into the joint and severed the extensor tendon. The cut wraps around his whole fetlock and his lower leg was basically hanging off. He's been through 3 casts, 2 splints, 2 bouts of colic, 5 months of stall rest (and counting) and he's STILL not healed. Haha, it's been a long road but he's been amazing and me and the vets are hoping for a full recovery. :)
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        02-07-2013, 03:17 PM
      #44
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by blush    
    Good to hear! You seem to be taking wonderful care of your guy - I hope to be reading about a happy ending soon. :)
    Yeah, I was told that any washing with water is not good. If there is nothing else to use, water is do-able but not ideal. Cold, warm, or hot...water will promote proud flesh. :( I understand sometimes we need to use it, just try and use water sparingly haha!

    Um, I'd be seriously doubting your original vet. Sounds like they were kinda doing a lazy (and incorrect haha) job! No vet in their right mind would tell you to keep or start cold hosing after such a traumatic injury. Also, if it were me - I would not stop bandaging the wound until there is skin (with hair growing on it) covering the cut. Especially if he's outside I wouldn't want to take the chance of getting something in there and causing infection. ;)


    Ughhh, well my horse (Robbie) sliced open his fetlock into the joint and severed the extensor tendon. The cut wraps around his whole fetlock and his lower leg was basically hanging off. He's been through 3 casts, 2 splints, 2 bouts of colic, 5 months of stall rest (and counting) and he's STILL not healed. Haha, it's been a long road but he's been amazing and me and the vets are hoping for a full recovery. :)
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    While it is a pain in the @$$ to change a bandage every couple days, I will sure change it for as long as I need to. I want it to heal as fast as possible, and as correct as possible. So if bandaging is the best case scenario, then I guess I will bandage away!

    Ick! Your poor Robbie. I feel so lucky that Red didn't do any horrible damage to the inside parts. I sure hope he heals up for you 100%!!

    My old horse Beau tried to cut his own foot off too, many years ago. (Hence why I thought I should be "good to go" on serious injuries for a while.) Started along the coronary band of his front foot, and down and under through the frog. It was disgusting when he moved, as the lower half of his foot lagged behind the rest. I was only 17 then, and my parents are "minimalists", so we took him to the small town vet to be stitched up (not an equine specialist) and then a few months later we had x-rays done with an equine specialist, but that's it. The rest we just did on our own. And by some miracle, about 1 year later after tons of TLC and no riding, he miraculously came back sound.

    I hope Robbie does too!
         
        02-07-2013, 05:12 PM
      #45
    Super Moderator
    This is a good video showing how to bandage a hock.
    Bandaging Your Horse's Hock - YouTube

    If he is getting a bit fussy about you dressing the area get someone to hold the front foot on the same side up high to the outside of his elbow.
    The woman in the video does say that you should not be kneeling down which is very true!
         
        02-07-2013, 05:25 PM
      #46
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
    This is a good video showing how to bandage a hock.
    Bandaging Your Horse's Hock - YouTube

    If he is getting a bit fussy about you dressing the area get someone to hold the front foot on the same side up high to the outside of his elbow.
    The woman in the video does say that you should not be kneeling down which is very true!
    Yes, the lady I board my horses with has been helping me by managing his "front end". Holding his head, and grabbing a scruff of skin if he is moving, and leaving him alone when he stands nicely.

    That video nicely shows the figure 8. Thanks for posting!!

    No, I do not kneel. I would not feel comfortable doing that!!! Honestly, how she is squatting in the video too, I would not like that either. What I do, is I stand completely facing backwards, directly next to his leg. (He can't kick at me directly sideways). And I stay very, very close to him so even if he would kick and somehow get me, he wouldn't have much velocity behind it. I just bend over at the waist, so I am still completely standing and can move quickly if I need to. And I can also keep my left shoulder pushed against his left hip, to keep him standing still against the stall wall. It's working pretty good that way.

    Just to note, he's never tried to kick at me. Just plain refused to stand still! But we've got him figured out now. And hopefully my bandaging skills will continue to get better. That figure 8 design will help a lot!
         
        02-08-2013, 11:18 AM
      #47
    Green Broke
    How's my bandaging job now?

    I made sure to do the figure 8 around his hock with my brown supporting gauze and also my vet wrap.

    Don't mind all the "extra" cotton on his hock joint. I did cut slits in all the cotton padding layers so that he can have movement there.

    I think he looks nice in baby blue ... don't you? (Don't mind all the blood on his lower leg and hoof. That's just left over from when the vet hacked off that extra skin chunk, and it bled like crazy.. It hasn't really been warm enough yet to soap/water and clean his leg up. The weekend is not looking any nicer either to do that.)






         
        02-08-2013, 11:26 AM
      #48
    Weanling
    I would personally stay away from using the duct tape on either side of the bandage. Duct tape does not allow for any stretch and with the sensitive tendons/tissues on the leg, it could actually do some damage when your horse tries to move and is restricted by it.

    I use Elastoplast to keep the top and bottom in place and secure. It is just as sticky and strong as duct tape but it stretches a lot and allows for swelling/movement. The only time I use duct tape was on robbie's cast to decorate haha and a little strip on the velcro part of the stable bandage to keep it from coming apart.
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    Edit: just to add that if you absolutely MUST use duct tape, make sure it's fairly loose and just drape it around his leg. But I'd reallllllly suggest getting some elastoplast.
         
        02-08-2013, 12:17 PM
      #49
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
    As my Grandmother would say, "Long way from his heart!"

    Honestly if horses can get into trouble - they will.

    Go to Resolve Wound - Home and get some of this salve, it is brilliant for healing wounds like this.

    The thing I would like to say is that whoever is bandaging the wound is doing it totally incorrectly! The point of the hock should never have any pressure on it and, over any joint the bandage needs to be put on in a figure of eight. If it was the vet that did it then they need to learn how to bandage correctly.
    Thank you foxhunter! We no longer offer the salve for sale. It's available to people we know, past customers, etc. We've gone back to offering like we did in the past, and that's via word of mouth/referrals to people like you, (foxhunter), past customers and people we know.

    I totally agree with the bandaging. I'd add more padding. No duct tape, use elastikon, and add a stovepipe, or stack bandage to the bottom if the figure 8 hock bandage doesn't stay put.

    My filly had a similar injury Thanksgiving weekend. She rolled in the round pen along the edge and got hung up. I only wrapped it for a week, as she also had a capped hock, and the entire hock was very swollen. The wound was on the front like your horse, just not as big. It could have gotten out of control fast. The first week I bandaged and applied Resolve Wound. After that, I just painted on a new layer of salve until it shrunk to nothing. No scar, no white hairs, and no proud flesh! Resolve Wound - Hock Injury Thank God her hock has completely gone back down, and there's no trace of swelling or injury. I started riding her again 2 weeks ago, and penned a set of heifers on her yesterday.

    I used two pieces of cotton padding, and although it doesn't show well in the photo, the back of the hock is open so that when she walked, or was lying down, there wasn't pressure on the hock.
         
        02-08-2013, 01:23 PM
      #50
    Yearling
    When it comes to proud flesh, I have had no greater success than with Equaide. My barrel mare got her foot hung in a loose strand of barbed wire this past summer and sliced the back just above the heal bulbs completely open from one side to the other over an inch into the flesh. Every time she took a step, it gaped wide open. I started out with Underwood which allowed it to start healing from the inside out and I was actually told NOT to wrap it since the way you use it creates a "crust" so to speak. It did an amazing job keeping infection out and producing healthy clean granulated tissue which was necessary for things to fuse back together. BUT, proud flesh did kick in with a vengeance since it was a "below the knee" injury. That's when I switched to Equaide. That stuff is amazing on proud flesh. You do want to wrap with Equaide if it's a leg injury but it heals with amazing speed. My vet told me it would take 4-6 months for her to recover from the injury she had and I was riding her at a walk again within 11 weeks. It's been 6 months now and I'm running her on barrels again which the vet had her doubts she would ever do. And as far as cold hosing, it does aggravate proud flesh so I took an empty mustard squeeze bottle and filled it with distilled water that you buy at the grocery store and just kind of cleaned things up that way between bandage changes. If you opt for the Equaide, you'll want to just very lightly scrub it some with a soft tooth brush and get the proud flesh to bleed slightly. Proud flesh loves to bleed so it won't be hard to do. And then you just paint it on there with a little brush. I used a maxi pad to cover it, held it in place with gauze, and then went over that with vet wrap. By the way, you can get boxes of 18 or 36 rolls of off brand vet wrap on Ebay for way cheaper than the 3 or 4 packs at Tractor Supply. Anyway, just sharing my experience. We managed to heal my girl up with Underwood and Equaide without so much as a stitch. Really wishing you all the best and so sorry you're having to deal with this especially with it being so cold right now. :(
         

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