Need Some New Ideas - Chronic weight loss on rescue horse - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Need Some New Ideas - Chronic weight loss on rescue horse

This is a discussion on Need Some New Ideas - Chronic weight loss on rescue horse within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Powered by vBulletin super fast weight loss
  • Horse weight loss/feeding ideas

Like Tree5Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-24-2012, 09:39 AM
  #11
Green Broke
All great advice, just want to ditto checking for ulcers and anemia. He could even be dealing with both, given what he's been thru.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    10-24-2012, 09:59 AM
  #12
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by jagen    
Oops - almost forgot - this is what he eats...

This is one meal:
2 quarts beet pulp shreds (measured DRY then soaked)
5 quarts Strategy Healthy Edge
3 scoops Cool Calorie
1 scoops (1oz) Horseguard supplement
1/2 cup corn oil
(couple carrots, couple sugar cubes, an apple, whatever else he can mooch)

And he gets fed twice a day (I board, can't feed more often like I would like to). As much hay as he will eat - usually 3-4 flakes of fine stemmed grass hay (also twice a day). Also gets a small amount of alfalfa hay. I didn't think he "needed" the alfalfa since he should be getting adequate protein otherwise, but it had been suggested to me on top of what I feed so I do it.
The 2 things that strike me here are: How much does he way now and how much should he weigh? At 16.3HH he's a big boy and I'd guess he probably needs to be somewhere around 1500-1600 lbs? Strategy's feeding instructions call for 1/3 to 1/2% of total weight, and since he's thin I'd be going for the 1/2%, so he should be getting roughly 4 lbs/feeding if I'm doing the math right and if he really should weigh about 1500 lbs. Not sure what that 5 quart scoop actually holds, so you would need to fill the scoop and then weigh the feed to be sure.

One thing I've done when feeding up a thin horse is to feed the top recommendation of feed for what he SHOULD weigh, not what he weighs now, and added a couple of pounds of Ultium per feeding. Work up to the 2 lbs, it's really high in fat and works really well. Once I got the horse where I wanted him, then I cut back and eventually cut out the Ultium. Depending on how malnourished and underweight he was, it could take almost a year to get him back to where he belongs.
     
    10-24-2012, 08:58 PM
  #13
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians    
The 2 things that strike me here are: How much does he way now and how much should he weigh? At 16.3HH he's a big boy and I'd guess he probably needs to be somewhere around 1500-1600 lbs? Strategy's feeding instructions call for 1/3 to 1/2% of total weight, and since he's thin I'd be going for the 1/2%, so he should be getting roughly 4 lbs/feeding if I'm doing the math right and if he really should weigh about 1500 lbs. Not sure what that 5 quart scoop actually holds, so you would need to fill the scoop and then weigh the feed to be sure.

One thing I've done when feeding up a thin horse is to feed the top recommendation of feed for what he SHOULD weigh, not what he weighs now, and added a couple of pounds of Ultium per feeding. Work up to the 2 lbs, it's really high in fat and works really well. Once I got the horse where I wanted him, then I cut back and eventually cut out the Ultium. Depending on how malnourished and underweight he was, it could take almost a year to get him back to where he belongs.

I'd recommend checking out the "care for an emaciated horse" sticky. If a horse is very chronically or severely undernourished, feeding the top recommendations for complete feeds can cause "refeeding syndrome" and do more harm than good, just an FYI for anyone else reading this thread looking for similar advice.
     
    10-24-2012, 09:30 PM
  #14
Started
The best thing I've found for any hard keeper is hay cubes, thoroughly soaked. Assuming his parasite issues have been worked out and he's able to actually use his own nutrition for himself then hay cubes will make a great difference.

We had a rescue who was emaciated to the point he couldn't stand, we of course weaned him on to regular food but we gave him Alfalfa/Timothy hay cubes mixed, 2 quarts thoroughly soaked 4-5 times a day. On top of the typical grain we'd give a horse the size he should be, not the size he was. Plus free choice hay.

I hear the beet pulp is supposed to be great for horses but I've honestly never seen it do anything at all. It just seems to go right through them. Hay cubes are my favorite for weight gain in horses, it just reinflates them :P it also ensures they're getting a good amount of water to help reduce colic chances.

Good luck, I'd love some transformation pics!
NBEventer likes this.
     
    10-24-2012, 10:10 PM
  #15
Foal
Just wanted to quickly thank you all for the replies - i'm late getting out to feed as is but here's a short note -

Did initial bloodwork when we first got him (it was late when I posted, sorry for forgetting a very important detail)...his iron was "low" (i do not have the number at hand), so we had him on lixotinic (sp?). We did not recheck.

I weigh feed but not religiously like I should - the 5 quarts weighs about 6 lbs - I think I've got it super close as far as the weight of it because I am at the feed store replacing 100 pounds of Strategy every friday. (he gets 5 quarts and my other horse gets 2 quarts per day (close to 2 1/2 pounds).

I will look into the hay cubes - should I feed less of his other hay if I start him on the hay cubes?

(running out the door now, thank you again)
     
    10-24-2012, 10:26 PM
  #16
Showing
When I'd bo't my arab he too had no topline, big worm belly, etc. I'm a big fan of senior horse feeds as they contain everything a horse needs to live on. I began with just a cup once daily then gradually built him up to three lbs 2 x daily. I spread it over a large feeder so he had to nibble it, not wolf it down. He also got timothy hay and some grass. He was dewormed and done again 30 days later. At 6 weeks his belly was gone, his topline was back to normal and his coat shone. The larger the surface you can scatter his pellets over the slower he eats them - better digestion. Try a small mesh hay net that forces him to nibble. With horses, the faster in, the faster out. Are you the one feeding twice daily or is someone else?
Spotted likes this.
     
    10-24-2012, 10:27 PM
  #17
Yearling
Scoops and flakes mean nothing, you need to weigh everything first and go from there.
I would feed all he can eat hay, beet pulp with no mollasas and a senier feed.
Take away the corn oil, & sugar cubes for sure!

He needs 1.5 to 2% of his body weight in feed per day. Majority of that weight being hay. Considering he is under weight, give him all you can hay/grasses and then add in the soaked beet pulp and senior feed.

Its very easy for a horse to lose weight and very hard to get it back on.
So for a 1500 lbs horse( at normal weight) he should have 30 lbs of food per day to sustain his weight..
Hope this helps
Muppetgirl likes this.
     
    10-24-2012, 10:33 PM
  #18
Showing
Did you ask the vet to age him? How much turnout is he getting? He needs to be out and moving around which aids digestion. He should be out 24/7 or at least most of the day. If someone else is feeding him, he may not be getting the feed you think he is.
     
    10-25-2012, 02:16 AM
  #19
Foal
I don't recall any of the vets giving him a body score. I personally would put him between a 1 and a 2. Definitely a 1 when I got him, with slight improvement.

He is turned out 24/7. They come in and eat in their stall, however the stall opens up into the run which opens up into his pasture.

Was trying to cover all the questions too - normally I don't blanket my horses unless it is really cold, but the drastic dip over the last several nights was warranted a blanket for him. I can't afford him to waste any calories keeping warm.

One vet (regular vet) aged him at 14-15ish, the equine dentist put him at 12-14. Both vets recommended the corn oil (or vegetable oil).

I feed every evening and the barn owner feeds in the morning. I set out all feed and hay for the morning.

Calling the vet as soon as they open in the morning. A few days ago, I thought he hurt his front leg somehow since it was swollen from the knee down, mostly on the inside, so I have been making extra trips out to hose it. No laceration or anything. Wasn't anything red-flag-worthy and he wasn't lame on it. Tonight it was way more painful than yesterday, but now the other front leg is swollen like this. Hind legs not stocked up. Very puzzled now. Not like the typical stocking up that horses often get from inactivity or standing around. Even with turnout, i've had 1 or 2 who would stock up a little when the weather would turn cold because they would stand inside and eat hay instead of walking around grazing, but when i've seen it, it's always in the hind end and rarely in the front - and when it was, it was in both front legs, not one then the other...this is just weird.
     
    10-25-2012, 03:37 AM
  #20
Foal
Ack, I don't know how to edit my posts after I put them up - on the body score, on the 0 to 9 (Henneke) scale, I would put him at a 3.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Weight loss for the pasture horse englishaqh Horse Health 5 09-10-2012 09:06 PM
Weight loss, loss of appetite in old horse EasterBunny Horse Health 29 07-26-2012 10:52 PM
Weight loss journey to a new horse.... annaleah Member Journals 3 01-02-2012 07:11 PM
Depression/sluggishness, weight loss, muscle loss barrelracerchick Horse Health 39 06-16-2011 02:02 AM
Chronic Weight loss with swelling when grained Hlucas Horse Health 0 09-25-2010 10:04 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0