need your help figuring jarreds problem
   

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need your help figuring jarreds problem

This is a discussion on need your help figuring jarreds problem within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • My horse is lame when trotting a circle but not in straight line

 
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    05-08-2008, 06:46 AM
  #1
Trained
need your help figuring jarreds problem

Ok so im getting really annoyed with this process of figuring out what is going on with jarred. I've now had 2 chiros out (3 visits all up ), the farrier once and my vet twice. Farrier said feets etc great. The vet says he can't see anything wrong and the first chiro who was useless mind you, said nothing was out of whack. The guy I would prefer to use is out of action for a while as his wife is very sick so I've had to work on finding who I can.

The last guy seemed a little better and did something or rather and said he should be fine now (i wasnt there I had to work so I got rich to go out there and he's not the best at relaying info but the bottom line was that all shouuld be fine now.) it wasnt!!! So we got him out again and once again rich had to go. He didnt work on him as he didnt think anything else was wrong :roll: but I know there is. Quite aside from the fact he looks lame I know he isnt right. Between him and my dog its cost me around $2500 over the last month and I can't afford much more at the moment. It can always be done if it has too but other things are being forgotten while we have to pay for all these vet etc bills

I got a few minutes of video on the lunge today in the hope that someone can pin point his problem. I've fortunately rarely had to deal with lameness or pain issues so im not the best at picking where the problem originates.

Please excuse the cell phone constantly going off in the background. My friend who was taking the video has a new "friend" and they were messaging constantly :roll:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FqV9SYA89T4
     
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    05-08-2008, 09:50 AM
  #2
Yearling
Lunging and especially lunging in a video is a hard way to really assess a horse. It's more useful for assessing a transient or very mild lameness AFTER you've watched the horse move out in a straight line on a hard surface.

Have you have a GOOD lameness exam done on him by an equine vet yet? This would include flexion tests as well as watching the horse move out in a straight line both from behind and from the side. If not, that is where you should go next rather than going to a "specialist"--farrier or chiro--who will only be able to look for and find problems in their specific "area". With a good visual exam of the horse moving and flexion tests the vet should be able to determine at least what leg the problem is in and then if where in the leg is still questionable he can do local nerve blocks to find out what part of the leg is painful. The vet should also check for back pain as part of a lameness exam.
     
    05-08-2008, 10:04 AM
  #3
Showing
Aww. :(
Well I'm no expert, but in the video something about his left hind bothers me...idk, it just doesn't seem right to me?
     
    05-08-2008, 10:07 AM
  #4
Green Broke
I hear you about the cost thing!

But as Ryle said, go ahead and have the vet out. I just had my saddlebred worked up on...intermentant lameness that no one could figure out.

He gave him the full lameness workup - flexxion tests, trotting in a straight line, trotting in a circle - etc. Also, blocked nerves and took x-rays. All of that was only $140 - and now, my roany pony is back!

All of that to say "Go ahead and call the vet" - you'll probably get a very clear idea of what's going on with a plan to get him on the road to recovery.

Good Luck!
     
    05-08-2008, 10:54 AM
  #5
Yearling
I'm going to say hocks. I say that because he moves the same way my older one does. His hocks have been in the process of fusing for three or four years. That said, I'm not a vet and neither is anyone else on here. Your vet should be able to do an assessment for a farm call out and exam fee. That would be around $125-150. Then when it's narrowed down you may wish to get x-ray's done, they will usually run you about $25 per frame.
     
    05-08-2008, 06:01 PM
  #6
Trained
Ryle - im aware that its not the best way of showing things but its not completely useless

Poptart - thanks! I was thinking back end too

Kickshaw - as I said, the vet has been out twice and the first time he did a whole bunch of stuff with him plus checked tacking etc and said all good. He never mentioned x-rays and stuff like that.

I know I will still be getting the vet out again but im trying to get some input so I can start to maybe suggest areas for him to check rather than him rolling his eyes whenever I talk to him about it.

G&K's Mom - thank you :)
     
    05-08-2008, 09:54 PM
  #7
Yearling
You are better off not saying--"I think his X, doc" because then your vet may focus too much on that one area and miss something. And if your prev. Vet didn't see anything it may be worthwhile to get a different vet to look at him this time--fresh eyes/fresh perspective can be most useful. Also, work him the day before your vet sees him--this often helps to make subtle lameness more apparent.

And while it may be a bit costly to have the vet out, it would be even more costly to keep tyring this person and that person and never get a solid answer.
     
    05-09-2008, 04:54 AM
  #8
Weanling

Well it looks like a Vet should come out.
Have you tried Bowen? What about Muscel therpy? Muscel therpy is different to chiro. I know of a Muscel man (what he gets called hehe) and he travels all around Queensland. He cost $70 if he finds the problem, if he can't find whats wrong with him, he will say!! And only charge you $10 fuel money.

That's a way cheaper alternative to a Vet. And personaly I don't get Vets out anymore unless my horse requirs stitches etc. They are just too dear. Totally Uncalled for!

Anyways, I'll see what you think
     
    05-09-2008, 06:21 AM
  #9
Trained
Im pretty sure I never said I was going to get the same vet. I will be getting another one out. Im not silly enough to get the same vet again

And while I know I can't TELL the vet where to look if I get fobbed off again I can at least have something to ask him to do. He can look him over and if this one doesnt find anything then I have the opportunity to ask him to check something else out a little more

All I want is some input on what others can see.
     
    05-09-2008, 09:39 AM
  #10
Green Broke
Your vet said he couldn't see anything wrong? Yikes...

It's hard to see in the video, but it looks like a hind end lameness to me. I'm thinking left as well. I'd have to agree with Ryle, I think a good lameness eval (with trotting on a hard surface, flexions, etc) will be beneficial. X-rays if it comes down to it. How long has this been going on? And I'm assuming there is no puffiness or heat in his leg? How old is he? Fusing hocks is a good possibility.
     

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