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  • Vets opinion of natural balance shoes
  • Natural balance shoes with 2 degree wedge

 
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    07-17-2012, 02:08 AM
  #1
Foal
Need Your Info!

My horse has laminitis!!!

I was wondering what methods you have used or methods you have seen used before that work for a horse with laminitis?

I've heard people say there is no cure, but I really want to try.

The farrier has told me to just exercise her up and down hills because it will help the hoof to grow the right way.( I thought you weren't supposed to exercise them at all while they heal??) he also said to feed her copper sulphate to help repair it.
And the vet is coming out soon so I will get his opinion.

But in the meantime...

Any tips that help would be appreciated also.

Thank you
     
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    07-17-2012, 03:28 AM
  #2
Green Broke
I would not exercise her up and down hills until your Vet says okay.
I never heard of any product to help. You may try to google "treatments for lamintits" and then discuss these with your Vet. I have heard of heart bar shoes, padded shoes, etc. Be very careful of what you feed from now on. If she has not affected the coffin bone, and the other little bones in the hoof, she may recover . You can find a picture of the hoof on lots of sites. Google hoof anatomy. Good luck to you and your mare. Again, I would wait for the Vet, the only other thing I would do, is hose her feet with cool water once or twice a day. If you have her in a stall, keep lots of shavings so it is soft. Keep her off lush pastures , no grain.
     
    07-17-2012, 04:06 AM
  #3
Trained
Hi,

Firstly, if your horse is lame & currently suffering a laminitic 'attack', get her onto soft footing & off the grass &/or rich/starchy feed she's on, ASAP & call a good equine vet immediately.

If not the above, what's going on? Has the horse already got mechanical changes from chronic laminitis? Is it just 'low grade'? More info & pics if you want any specific advice.

Quote:
I was wondering what methods you have used or methods you have seen used before that work for a horse with laminitis?
Check out hoofrehab.com & barehoofcare.com for starters, to understand more about what may be needed, and safergrass.org also has some good diet/metabolic related info.

Very basically, there are a few things that are necessary; addressing the cause, which is commonly diet related; good frequent trimming which will get/keep the feet well balanced and take the pressure off compromised walls/laminae; hoof support/protection, wherever necessary(bad cases may need full time support even in the paddock), that supports the *entire* base of the foot and doesn't peripherally load the walls.

Quote:
The farrier has told me to just exercise her up and down hills because it will help the hoof to grow the right way.( I thought you weren't supposed to exercise them at all while they heal??) he also said to feed her copper sulphate to help repair it.
If the horse has been well trimmed so as to alleviate/avoid further damage and if she can exercise comfortably - be that bare or with boots or such - exercise is generally a good thing. It's best not to coop them up, but if she's sore, not trimmed right, etc, don't force her either.

I would NOT feed CS except on advice of a nutritionist personally. If you do, feed it with dolomite(calcium & magnesium) and literally a pinch every few days is likely enough. It's a heavy metal & toxic in excess. So saying, copper is indeed one of the trace minerals necessary for good hoof growth that is commonly deficient in the diet. Others include zinc, magnesium, iodine and amino acids/essential fatties. I'd consult a nutritionist (independent of feed co's) or use a program such as feedxl.com to work out what your horse needs.
     
    07-19-2012, 06:32 AM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenson    
I would not exercise her up and down hills until your Vet says okay.
I never heard of any product to help. You may try to google "treatments for lamintits" and then discuss these with your Vet. I have heard of heart bar shoes, padded shoes, etc. Be very careful of what you feed from now on. If she has not affected the coffin bone, and the other little bones in the hoof, she may recover . You can find a picture of the hoof on lots of sites. Google hoof anatomy. Good luck to you and your mare. Again, I would wait for the Vet, the only other thing I would do, is hose her feet with cool water once or twice a day. If you have her in a stall, keep lots of shavings so it is soft. Keep her off lush pastures , no grain.
Yes, Google sites mentioned bar shoes quite a bit but there were also other sites that say to just 'let it grow naturally'. So I wasn't sure where to go.
But ,yes, I will discuss it with the vet, and farrier.
Thank you for your help
     
    07-19-2012, 06:48 AM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Hi,

Firstly, if your horse is lame & currently suffering a laminitic 'attack', get her onto soft footing & off the grass &/or rich/starchy feed she's on, ASAP & call a good equine vet immediately.

If not the above, what's going on? Has the horse already got mechanical changes from chronic laminitis? Is it just 'low grade'? More info & pics if you want any specific advice.



Check out hoofrehab.com & barehoofcare.com for starters, to understand more about what may be needed, and safergrass.org also has some good diet/metabolic related info.

Very basically, there are a few things that are necessary; addressing the cause, which is commonly diet related; good frequent trimming which will get/keep the feet well balanced and take the pressure off compromised walls/laminae; hoof support/protection, wherever necessary(bad cases may need full time support even in the paddock), that supports the *entire* base of the foot and doesn't peripherally load the walls.



If the horse has been well trimmed so as to alleviate/avoid further damage and if she can exercise comfortably - be that bare or with boots or such - exercise is generally a good thing. It's best not to coop them up, but if she's sore, not trimmed right, etc, don't force her either.

I would NOT feed CS except on advice of a nutritionist personally. If you do, feed it with dolomite(calcium & magnesium) and literally a pinch every few days is likely enough. It's a heavy metal & toxic in excess. So saying, copper is indeed one of the trace minerals necessary for good hoof growth that is commonly deficient in the diet. Others include zinc, magnesium, iodine and amino acids/essential fatties. I'd consult a nutritionist (independent of feed co's) or use a program such as feedxl.com to work out what your horse needs.
The websites had great information!
Yes, the farrier is now coming for more regular trimming.
I agree, I tend not to coop her up.
Yes, actually this one website said to only feed CS with dolomite to make sure there was absolutely no risk anything toxic.
I'll look into those things, thank you so much for your help!!
     
    07-19-2012, 07:03 AM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by BitingTheBit    
Yes, actually this one website said to only feed CS with dolomite to make sure there was absolutely no risk anything toxic.
With respect, as with any other source of info, don't just believe it because it's written on a website. Feeding with dolomite doesn't remove the toxicity of overdose, just helps with the balance of nutritients, but there are many more aside from Cu, Ca & Mg to consider.
     
    07-20-2012, 01:16 AM
  #7
Foal
Yes the internet isn't 100% trustworthy.
That's why I prefer to ask on this forum :)
     
    07-20-2012, 01:30 AM
  #8
Yearling
Laminitis is a broad word - do you mean a chronic foot pain that is undiagnosed or can't be diagnosed (vets can't figure it out)? In other words, not acute (happening right now) but just a pain that your horse will just deal with on a daily basis?

I had an old fart that had chronic laminitis - aluminium natural balance shoes kept him sound, and my kiddos could ride him around the house (light riding) without a lame step, well into his teens. He didn't have any navicular issues, but sometimes (and we never could pinpoint why) he would feel better in a 2 degree wedge aluminum natural balance shoe.

Of course he's dead and buried in my garden and that was years ago but he also seemed to respond well to devils claw supplemented in his feed and somedays he needed a little banamine. But those shoes made him a happy camper.

Just some ideas...maybe that will help.
     

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