Neurological Disorder? Anyone have experience with this? - Page 3
 
 

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Neurological Disorder? Anyone have experience with this?

This is a discussion on Neurological Disorder? Anyone have experience with this? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Neuroligical horses alfalfa hay
  • Whoch is better purina enrich or empower grass supp

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    11-17-2013, 04:21 PM
  #21
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Platinumhotrodder    
I should mention that last week we did begin changing his feed over to a low starch diet. We chose Purina's well solve to help maintain his weight but also to reduce his sugar intake. Here is the link: Purina Horse Feeds - WELLSOLVE
It is a complete feed with added supplements which support tissue repair. It also has a daily dose of biotin which will continue to help with transitioning to bare feet. He has always had a biotin supplement but now its all in one. I am interested to see if this will do anything. I also read an article months ago that young horses and their growth plates can be impacted by their protein intake. My vet did not seem to think that was his case and felt that his feed was appropriate. He has always been on LMF Developmental G, or Omolene 200.
What type of hay is he getting? You want to avoid grain hays, like oat or forage... super high in sugar and starches. Good grass hay is the best. Look also in a rain balancer(Purina Enrich, Nutrena Empower Balance, TC 30% supplement), since he's reading now. Supplies everything he needs, on top of his hay, without unnecessary calories, starches and sugars
     
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    11-17-2013, 04:55 PM
  #22
Green Broke
Have you had your hay tested for content? I know some mineral deficiencies can look like neuro issues such as magnesium deficiency although I haven't seen anything this severe. Just a thought.
     
    11-17-2013, 05:49 PM
  #23
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
What type of hay is he getting? You want to avoid grain hays, like oat or forage... super high in sugar and starches. Good grass hay is the best. Look also in a rain balancer(Purina Enrich, Nutrena Empower Balance, TC 30% supplement), since he's reading now. Supplies everything he needs, on top of his hay, without unnecessary calories, starches and sugars
oh my, this phone has a mind of its own...sorry....ration balancer, not rain balancer
and if course, he's resting, not reading.......
     
    11-17-2013, 05:51 PM
  #24
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinnys Whinny    
Have you had your hay tested for content? I know some mineral deficiencies can look like neuro issues such as magnesium deficiency although I haven't seen anything this severe. Just a thought.
You got a point there.. California it's low in magnesium, rather high in selenium and iron
     
    11-17-2013, 06:37 PM
  #25
Green Broke
Oh, I didn't notice the California. I grew up there and in my experience "hay" was alfalfa, not the lovely pasture grassy wonderness most people have. I don't think I ever boarded at a stable in Ca that didn't feed either alfalfa hay or alfalfa cubes. I know that can make quite a difference in content right there.
     
    11-17-2013, 07:08 PM
  #26
Trained
Magnesium already low here, the high calcium in alfalfa hinders absorption of Mg, and Mg is needed for muscles and nerves.....hmm.....
     
    11-17-2013, 07:15 PM
  #27
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Platinumhotrodder    
I should mention that last week we did begin changing his feed over to a low starch diet. We chose Purina's well solve to help maintain his weight but also to reduce his sugar intake. Here is the link: Purina Horse Feeds - WELLSOLVE
It is a complete feed with added supplements which support tissue repair. It also has a daily dose of biotin which will continue to help with transitioning to bare feet. He has always had a biotin supplement but now its all in one. I am interested to see if this will do anything. I also read an article months ago that young horses and their growth plates can be impacted by their protein intake. My vet did not seem to think that was his case and felt that his feed was appropriate. He has always been on LMF Developmental G, or Omolene 200.
I feel the WellSolve line is nothing more than a gimmick. All hype. Just like the low carb they market for people. There are a ton of better choices out there and you will save $$ as well. What's the goal of your concentrates? As others have mentioned, your hay is the biggest potential contributor of sugars and starch.
     
    11-17-2013, 07:44 PM
  #28
Foal
Hay and other things :)

Tuck has always received a solid grass hay. The barn owner has a ranch and grows their own hay. It has been analyzed and provided appropriate levels of content. He is still on grass hay in rehab and occasionally receives an alfalfa mix in the morning. I switched his feed to reduce the amount of sugars and starches and to maintain his weight in rehab and well solve seemed like a good choice.

Tuck's team of vets feel that this is a neuralgic problem stemming from his spinal cord. I have been told that if it is what they think, CVM Wobblers, he will most likely stay the same all of his life and potentially degenerate more with age. He has now been on previcox for one month this week and they think that it may be reducing any swelling and compression on his cord. If its an injury that did not show in any of the tests they are hoping his body will heal with the reduced swelling. It's not a very fun waiting game as it has been an emotional roller coaster, I told him if he wanted time off he could have just said so instead of developing this disorder oh our ponies and all the things we are willing to do for them. Thank you all for the support. I will keep you updated on his progress and of course when he is reevaluated. Here is a picture from last week, it just makes me smile
Attached Images
File Type: jpg TuckBirthday01.jpg (48.0 KB, 49 views)
     
    11-17-2013, 11:29 PM
  #29
Started
Sorry your going through this He is such a lovely looking horse: While there is cases that have recovered,prognosis generally isn't the greatest for wobblers. I went through it with one of my horses My vet told me of a case where horse with symptoms like my boy, went on & made a complete recovery. Was showing & become a herd stallion. I personally had met that stallion & even bred a mare to him & would never had known.
My story Below not as happy I hope that your boy's outcome is more positive......

I Held that hope that my Boy would recover & did all I could to see that happen.He displayed symptoms similar to yours. Purchased as a weanling to be by potential future stallion. We showed him as a yearling & he proved himself in the show pen. Then his early 2 yr old year show signs.He did have an incident of going over a fence, bent it up. Although other than a few scrapes at the time seemed ok. Think that might have been the cause As It wasn't long after that noticed signs more subtle at first so brushed them off ,tripping,trouble holding a circle,actually falling down when longing,that did it! The incoordination was more apparent. I took him to vet,was stall/paddock rested,dietary changes,took him to place for physio rehab,had neck joint injected . I knew he would probably never ride/show career done, but hoped he would be breeding sound.I saw such progress & had hopes for him... then suddenly one week he regressed & worsened to point that getting himself up & walking difficult,decision was made to have him humanely put down
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    11-18-2013, 12:15 AM
  #30
Foal
Wow PaintedPastures, our stories sound very similar I'm so sorry to hear about your boy, this experience has really opened my eyes. Did your vets diagnose him with CVM as well? My vets also suggested possible neck injections as a different strategy. Was he ever on any long term anti inflamitories like Previcox? I am worried what is going to happen when we take him off of it for his reevaluation. My close friend has a horse that was diagnosed with CVM wobblers and she actually did the basket surgery. It was a very long road for them and he is sound for pasture and light riding. Thank you for sharing your story, I am very sorry for your outcome. Do you remember what level of ataxia he was listed as? Tuck was at a 2/5 and seems to be doing better at the moment.
     

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