Is the new feed to blame?
   

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Is the new feed to blame?

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        12-28-2013, 12:55 AM
      #1
    Foal
    Unhappy Is the new feed to blame?

    So I recently started giving my Appendix about four cups(three times a week) of Omolene 200. I have started noticing a dramatic change in his personality and attitude.

    He is being very distant. He usually is very sweet, and he is now acting more distant...I'm not sure how to explain it.
    Next, he has started this very naught habit of turning in circled when I try to mount. I get anywhere near the saddle and he will turn. He has never done this before. He usually is just a bit antsy but after a few times of asking him to stand still he will do so. Now, I have to have someone hold him because no matter how many corrections I make (I did it for about thirty minutes one time) he won't stand still.
    Lastly, he has started chewing a lot and bobbing his head. If I'm asking him to move out when lunging, he will turn towards me and bobb his head up and down sometimes with ears back. Today he even went so far as to do it while I was on him. I had to get off because he was being uncontrollable. After trying to lunge tonight I just had him standing facing me for a head scratch and he started doing he head bobbing again!

    The only thing I can think of is that it may be the food

    Can anyone tell me if my thoughts are correct? Even though it's only a small amount, could it change him this much? He naturally has a very thoroughbred attitude and was previously raced.
         
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        12-28-2013, 01:05 AM
      #2
    Trained
    IMO, he's challenging you and it's not the food. Whenever he gets difficult, you give in. Instead of giving him a CTJ meeting when he gets antsy when you mount, you let it get to where he's spinning in circles. Instead of giving him the well earned CTJ then, you get someone to hold him. You lunge him and he shakes his head at you with his ears back? He'd think he was going to die if he was mine. He's being disrespectful and you're not putting the blame where it belongs, on him for being that way and you for allowing it.
    Yogiwick likes this.
         
        12-28-2013, 01:18 AM
      #3
    Started
    Even IF the food was causing changes it would not cause very specific behavioral changes. That would be training. It MIGHT be making him "hotter" and more eager to challenge you, but again, training would take care of this.

    To even think of the food sounds like an excuse, imo. It doesn't seem practical.
         
        12-28-2013, 01:22 AM
      #4
    Foal
    Not to shove away advice but it's not a training issue. I free lunge him in the arena with no equipment; I have gotten him to the point where he will lunge around me, or in whatever shape I choose at whatever speed I ask and as the slight shift of my body or my eyes have him change directions, tighten the circle, stop, lead change, and come back to me. He is a very sweet, smart, and willing horse who has never, ever had an issue with what I ask. I have never even had so much as asking for a great or pulling on the lead from this guy. The not standing still is a working progress, he is off the track, and he use to be to the point where it would take me five minutes to get him to stop dancing when I mounted, and after a while he was to the point where it took maybe a minute. Huge improvement.

    It is not a training issue. Lol...it's something beyond that seeing as I have not changed out schedule or my methods. He is not the type of horse to "challenge" anyone especially on the ground. If he is challenging me, there's an outside cause.

    I just don't see his training being a reasonable cause for this sudden and overly dramatic change.

    I do appreciate the advice though. If I can't end up finding what it is, I will re-assess my methods.
         
        12-28-2013, 01:31 AM
      #5
    Trained
    Ok, everything is perfect.
    tcvhorse likes this.
         
        12-28-2013, 01:32 AM
      #6
    Foal
    These are only the main things I have noticed. All together he has been very high strung and almost a bit aggressive especially towards heard members. I have heard its possible for high fat food to make a horses temperament a bit higher, and I thought it was a pretty good sign as these things started happening a week after I started the new feed.

    To note, I have never had any of my horses on anything but hay and pasture. But he needs to gain a bit of weight so I was trying adding feed.
         
        12-28-2013, 01:33 AM
      #7
    Trained
    Well I don't know what other issues there may be, or what CTJ means, so I'll leave that possibility out of it & just say that Omolene is a high energy, (very) high NSC sweetfeed. Effectively junk food. So yes, the feed could be affecting behaviour. Also not feeding little & often, starting with 4 cups per feed rather than one & building up to it, especially with high starch stuff can cause gut problems & discomfort which can cause behavioural probs/changes.

    If you need to hardfeed your horse for added calories or such, you need to feed over at least a couple of small feeds daily, and if you're feeding only for nutritional balance, you're better off feeding a quality low dose, low NSC 'ration balancer' type product appropriate for your horse's diet. Oh & still feed it daily at least, if at all possible.
    deserthorsewoman and Yogiwick like this.
         
        12-28-2013, 01:34 AM
      #8
    Super Moderator
    How long have you had him?
    I , too, wondered if he was just seeing that he could buffalo you with some behavior, but some of what you describe could be him in pain. Does he react to being cinched up, or get a sour look when the blanket or saddle come toward him? Pain could be making him grumpy about being lunged at any speed, and reactive under saddle, too.

    Is he at all sensitive to any pressure on his flanks, or belly? Poops are normal?
    loosie likes this.
         
        12-28-2013, 01:38 AM
      #9
    Started
    IF you are sure it's not a training issue, I will repeat what I said earlier. The only behavioral issue (generally speaking) that a feed will cause is making the horse hotter.

    Making him "hotter" can exacerbate something that is already a problem and the head tossing could be impatience, etc. I still think training would be an issue here (If he is hotter he may challenge you more, but in turn you should be able to handle it and react accordingly, so that he doesn't challenge you, that is what I was trying to say), but if his personality is changing because the feed is making him hot and you don't like it just change the feed. I HATE when people don't feed their horses what they need because they can't handle them, but if he can be healthy and a good weight and himself on something else, go for it. If it doesn't make a difference, change back and work on training.
    BridlesandBowties likes this.
         
        12-28-2013, 01:39 AM
      #10
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    Well I don't know what other issues there may be, or what CTJ means, so I'll leave that possibility out of it & just say that Omolene is a high energy, (very) high NSC sweetfeed. Effectively junk food. So yes, the feed could be affecting behaviour. Also not feeding little & often, starting with 4 cups per feed rather than one & building up to it, especially with high starch stuff can cause gut problems & discomfort which can cause behavioural probs/changes.

    If you need to hardfeed your horse for added calories or such, you need to feed over at least a couple of small feeds daily, and if you're feeding only for nutritional balance, you're better off feeding a quality low dose, low NSC 'ration balancer' type product appropriate for your horse's diet. Oh & still feed it daily at least, if at all possible.
    Hmm...that would make sense. The only reason I threw out the bad training is the fact I know him too well for it to just be a training problem.

    I feel like such a feed-idiot hehe. The store I got the food from said start at four. I guess I should've done a bit more research.

    If I where to switch to ration balancer, what would you suggest?
         

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