Okay I really want to be a vet.
 
 

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Okay I really want to be a vet.

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        04-04-2010, 05:37 PM
      #1
    Started
    Okay I really want to be a vet.

    Hi everyone,
    I'm 15 years old going to be 16 in October so I will be going to college in about three years. I want to know is there anyone on here who has gone through vet school?
    What does it all involve?
    Around how many years? Over here I think its 5-6 but not sure.

    I know it is a lot of hard work but I am willing to work for it.

    So anyone???
         
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        04-04-2010, 08:51 PM
      #2
    Foal
    Good for you! Yes, it will be lots of hard work and tons of money. First, get good grades in high school, math, science are the most important in the medical field. Take college credit courses if your high school offers them and start looking at Veterinary colleges now. Working for a local veterinarian will be great in furthering you along your " it's who you know" path. Plus it will really tell you if you want to follow that career path.

    Talk to your high school advisor, they should know more about what classes you should take along with your regular high school classes.
    You will be looking at two years of pre-veterinary classes and 4-6 years of vet school while doing hands on. The extra years are if you specialize in a discipline.

    Go online and look at Veterinary colleges too, they will be willing to send you info and answer all your questions.
         
        04-04-2010, 08:53 PM
      #3
    Yearling
    Hi there! I don't know where you live, so I can't tell you the requirements but in the US you need to have an undergraduate degree (4 years) and then vet school (4 more years). Getting in to vet school is extremely competitive as we only have 28 schools here, so doing well in math and science courses is very very important as well as having a good GPA in general.

    You will also want to get lots and lots of experience working with vets and animals. If you can't get a job yet, you can volunteer or shadow at clinics. Don't forget about shelters either! I had well over 4000 hours of animal/vet experience when I got accepted into vet school. Even if you want to be an equine vet, you should get a varied background in all kinds of animals as it will make you a much stronger candidate for vet school. You also need to score very well on the GRE.

    Don't forget to think about why you want to be a vet, I will warn you it is very hard work physically and emotionally. Equine vets are on call 24/7 so don't expect days off or to work less than a 10 hour day. You also don't make very much money, but if it is your passion then that shouldn't matter anyway! Good luck to you!
         
        04-04-2010, 08:56 PM
      #4
    Yearling
    I also thought about going into a DVM program and talked to a few local vets about their experiences, and one piece of advice stuck out to me. You have to do an undergrad in a science related field (you could probably do a B.Eng too, which, if you have the grades & mind, would be an AWESOME lead in to DVM) but most vets do B.Sc in Biology. My vet told me if he could do it over again he would have taken his undergrad at the school he hoped to get into the DVM program in (for instance, taken his undergrad at University of Price Edward Island and his grad degree at the Atlantic Veterinary College, which is on the UPEI campus and is part of that school). He said one of the best things you can do is volunteer in the vet school as an undergrad, and take whatever they'll give you, because you get your name out there and when its time for your application to go across the admissions board, you have a good resume built up and you will probably have name recognition. You'll also make great connections.

    That said, good luck and its great that you're planning ahead :)
         
        04-05-2010, 02:02 AM
      #5
    Trained
    I looked very seriously into getting into vet science for university. Between going to information sessions, reading the course content and doing work experience, I decided it wasn't for me.

    In Australia, the course is now 6 years full time and VERY costly. My course is only 3 years and I'm already feeling the strain of little income, I couldn't begin to imagine how hard 6 years would be! There is a VERY high TER (tertiary entrance score- the score you get at the end of high school), when I was enrolling for uni courses the TER here was up at 96 (out of 100) which is a huge score.
    Then once you get your degree, the pay is not great, work is quite difficult to come by and often you will work very long and haphazard hours.

    My suggestion to you is that you ring as many local vets as you can, and try to organise work experience. See what it's like first hand to be a vet. See the gore, the tears, and the joy. You want to witness all of it. It's not all about cute puppies and kittens getting their annual vaccinations, you will have to put a lot of animals down without showing your emotion, you will see some pretty horrible things. When I was 16 I did work experience at the biggest equine veterinary clinic in my state. The first day we had to put a horse down because it had a small fracture to the knee and the trainer didn't want to spell it (racehorse).
    The second day a horse came in that was having it's eye removed.
    The third, a truck pulled in that had travelled from the other side of the country (about 3 days drive through the middle of the Australian desert). It had gone down in the truck about halfway and broken it's leg. The truck driver didn't have a gun, and the whole trip they couldn't find a single person who would 'do the deed'. Horse couldn't even stand, so by the time it arrived at the clinic it's leg was horrifically infected, it was covered head to toe in the excrement of the 5 other horses travelling with it, and was on deaths door. We had to drag it out of the truck and onto the ground where it was shot.

    The next day one of the vets went out to drench a few racehorses. We got a call an hour later sayign he was in hospital with a fractured skull and suspected brain damage. The horse had bailed him up and reared at him, striking him first in the chest then once he was down proceeded to kick and strike at his head until the owner was able to pull the horse away. Luckily he was ok and was back to work in a few months - lucky as he is my favourite vet and I still use him to this day!

    Definitely not about playing with cute puppies and kittens!
         
        04-05-2010, 06:27 AM
      #6
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Peetz    
    Good for you! Yes, it will be lots of hard work and tons of money. First, get good grades in high school, math, science are the most important in the medical field. Take college credit courses if your high school offers them and start looking at Veterinary colleges now. Working for a local veterinarian will be great in furthering you along your " it's who you know" path. Plus it will really tell you if you want to follow that career path.

    Talk to your high school advisor, they should know more about what classes you should take along with your regular high school classes.
    You will be looking at two years of pre-veterinary classes and 4-6 years of vet school while doing hands on. The extra years are if you specialize in a discipline.

    Go online and look at Veterinary colleges too, they will be willing to send you info and answer all your questions.
    Well I will be taking applied maths outside of school because my school doesn't offer it. I know most of the subjects I am taking already in 5th and 6th year of secondary school. I will hopefully getting work experience this summer with my local equine vet and with the local small animal clinic as well.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tealamutt    
    Hi there! I don't know where you live, so I can't tell you the requirements but in the US you need to have an undergraduate degree (4 years) and then vet school (4 more years). Getting in to vet school is extremely competitive as we only have 28 schools here, so doing well in math and science courses is very very important as well as having a good GPA in general.

    You will also want to get lots and lots of experience working with vets and animals. If you can't get a job yet, you can volunteer or shadow at clinics. Don't forget about shelters either! I had well over 4000 hours of animal/vet experience when I got accepted into vet school. Even if you want to be an equine vet, you should get a varied background in all kinds of animals as it will make you a much stronger candidate for vet school. You also need to score very well on the GRE.

    Don't forget to think about why you want to be a vet, I will warn you it is very hard work physically and emotionally. Equine vets are on call 24/7 so don't expect days off or to work less than a 10 hour day. You also don't make very much money, but if it is your passion then that shouldn't matter anyway! Good luck to you!
    I live in Ireland over here in the one vet college we have over here you need to have two science subjects at higher level and get a C or higher along with good grades in maths and have work experience but those are the minimum requirements I will find out now the points that are also needed.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kmacdougall    
    I also thought about going into a DVM program and talked to a few local vets about their experiences, and one piece of advice stuck out to me. You have to do an undergrad in a science related field (you could probably do a B.Eng too, which, if you have the grades & mind, would be an AWESOME lead in to DVM) but most vets do B.Sc in Biology. My vet told me if he could do it over again he would have taken his undergrad at the school he hoped to get into the DVM program in (for instance, taken his undergrad at University of Price Edward Island and his grad degree at the Atlantic Veterinary College, which is on the UPEI campus and is part of that school). He said one of the best things you can do is volunteer in the vet school as an undergrad, and take whatever they'll give you, because you get your name out there and when its time for your application to go across the admissions board, you have a good resume built up and you will probably have name recognition. You'll also make great connections.

    That said, good luck and its great that you're planning ahead :)
    Yes I am planning to do an under graduate course as well before I go on to do vet college.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    I looked very seriously into getting into vet science for university. Between going to information sessions, reading the course content and doing work experience, I decided it wasn't for me.

    In Australia, the course is now 6 years full time and VERY costly. My course is only 3 years and I'm already feeling the strain of little income, I couldn't begin to imagine how hard 6 years would be! There is a VERY high TER (tertiary entrance score- the score you get at the end of high school), when I was enrolling for uni courses the TER here was up at 96 (out of 100) which is a huge score.
    Then once you get your degree, the pay is not great, work is quite difficult to come by and often you will work very long and haphazard hours.

    My suggestion to you is that you ring as many local vets as you can, and try to organise work experience. See what it's like first hand to be a vet. See the gore, the tears, and the joy. You want to witness all of it. It's not all about cute puppies and kittens getting their annual vaccinations, you will have to put a lot of animals down without showing your emotion, you will see some pretty horrible things. When I was 16 I did work experience at the biggest equine veterinary clinic in my state. The first day we had to put a horse down because it had a small fracture to the knee and the trainer didn't want to spell it (racehorse).
    The second day a horse came in that was having it's eye removed.
    The third, a truck pulled in that had travelled from the other side of the country (about 3 days drive through the middle of the Australian desert). It had gone down in the truck about halfway and broken it's leg. The truck driver didn't have a gun, and the whole trip they couldn't find a single person who would 'do the deed'. Horse couldn't even stand, so by the time it arrived at the clinic it's leg was horrifically infected, it was covered head to toe in the excrement of the 5 other horses travelling with it, and was on deaths door. We had to drag it out of the truck and onto the ground where it was shot.

    The next day one of the vets went out to drench a few racehorses. We got a call an hour later sayign he was in hospital with a fractured skull and suspected brain damage. The horse had bailed him up and reared at him, striking him first in the chest then once he was down proceeded to kick and strike at his head until the owner was able to pull the horse away. Luckily he was ok and was back to work in a few months - lucky as he is my favourite vet and I still use him to this day!

    Definitely not about playing with cute puppies and kittens!
    Yes the points are very high over here in Ireland as well. I just checked what it will be for people hoping to enter this year and it is 555 points out of 600 that's the lowest it has been in the last couple of years though.

    I know its not all puppies and kittens shots and all I am prepared for more than that. I have only spent a day working with a vet so far because at the time that was all I could get, and I have seen horses being put down being gelded and a surgery in that one day from that I still thought that this job was for me.
         
        04-05-2010, 07:04 AM
      #7
    Trained
    Good on you You have a stronger stomach than me haha!! If it's what you really want to do, and you're prepared to bury your head in text books and have no money or social life for 6 years, then do it. It'll be worth it in the end when you're a practicing vet and if you find it's not for you, well at least you will know how to work **** hard and always have something to fall back on.
         
        04-05-2010, 07:21 AM
      #8
    Foal
    I want to be a vet too! I think it sounds really rewarding:)
         
        04-05-2010, 09:27 AM
      #9
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    Good on you You have a stronger stomach than me haha!! If it's what you really want to do, and you're prepared to bury your head in text books and have no money or social life for 6 years, then do it. It'll be worth it in the end when you're a practicing vet and if you find it's not for you, well at least you will know how to work **** hard and always have something to fall back on.
    Thank you Kayty when he said we were going to a yard to do a surgery I said to myself this is were I find out if I can stick this stuff and I thought I would probably faint when I saw the blood and I was actually fine I thought it was great we got to help a horse breath properly again it was great, and one of the horses being gelded was like 6 and was a crazy stallion who wanted to escape that stable even when he was sedated his owners wouldn't even hold him I had to do it.

    At the moment I really think that this is really the job for me, people have told me I should go over to the US to go to college but I just can't afford to go any further away from home than to the UK which is only an hours plane from Dublin so two hours from home not that far so I really don't think I can go any further or afford to go any further from home.
         
        04-06-2010, 12:11 PM
      #10
    Started
    I know its three years away but I like planning ahead so I have looked at all the veterinary colleges in the UK there are seven and I have it down to five now.

    1. The royal college of Veterinary in London
    2. The University of Edinburgh
    3. The University of Glasgow
    4. The University of Cambridge
    5. The University of Nottingham

    I have emailed them all enquiring as to whether or not they have stables and if they do are they only for equine patients or do they accept livery because I would really like to take my horse if I can afford it.
         

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