Oral Hyaluronic Acid Study - No Effect on Lameness
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Oral Hyaluronic Acid Study - No Effect on Lameness

This is a discussion on Oral Hyaluronic Acid Study - No Effect on Lameness within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Hialuronic acid orally administration effects studies
  • Powered by vBulletin hyaluronic acid

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-20-2010, 04:59 PM
  #1
Trained
Oral Hyaluronic Acid Study - No Effect on Lameness

The Horse | Osteochondrosis: Oral Hyaluronic Acid Study in South America

An oral hyaluronan product did not produce any improvement in clinical or biochemical parameters in horses diagnosed with osteochondrosis in a new study, researchers from the Universidad de Caldas, in Columbia, recently reported. The study authors concluded that the evaluated product likely resulted in no detectable effect due to the small number of horses included in the study; however, they did state the treatment "did not produce any adverse clinical effects and was well tolerated by the horses in the study."
Osteochondrosis is a developmental orthopedic disease characterized by swelling and pain in the affected joints. It's caused by failed ossification (bone formation), which occurs most frequently in the hock, stifle, and fetlock joints.
"It is now well established that arthroscopic treatment, the surgical removal of osteochondral fragments, the debridement of the affected joint surface, and articular lavage are the most appropriate treatments for this disease," the researchers noted. "In many cases, early arthroscopic surgery can stop the development of the disease and prevent it from progressing to osteoarthritis."
But for horses not treated arthroscopically, or who continue to show clinical signs of disease postoperatively, alternative treatments are needed.
One such possibility is oral administration of hyaluronic acid. Previous studies have demonstrated hyaluronic acid's ability to alter cartilage metabolism when injected into a joint. But research into the effectiveness of its oral formulation is limited.
To evaluate the effect of oral hyaluronic acid in horses with osteochondrosis of one tarsocrural (hock) joint, researchers randomly separated 11 horses to either a treatment or control group. They administered 250 mg of a commercial oral hyaluronan product (trade name Hyal-Joint) or a placebo orally once daily for 60 days. The researchers assessed various clinical and biochemical parameters at the end of 60 days of treatment and again 30 days after cessation of supplementation.
Key findings of the study were:
  • No significant improvement in lameness scores;
  • No significant change in concentration of various inflammatory mediator levels (e.g., nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2);
  • No significant change in synovial effusion, and
  • No significant difference in hyaluronic acid concentrations in either blood or synovial fluid.
Details regarding this study are available in the full length article, "Effect of the administration of an oral hyaluronan formulation of clinical and biochemical parameters in young horses with osteochondrosis," which was published in the October 29, 2009, edition of the journal Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology. The abstract is available on PubMed
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Counteracting Lactic Acid trainerjockey Horse Training 4 07-23-2010 05:39 PM
Pair charged with killing horse with Pool acid WSArabians Horse Law 6 05-08-2010 12:04 PM
Oral meds -- massive problem Lonannuniel Horse Training 7 03-15-2010 07:06 PM
Oral Medication/Penicillin findler Horse Health 3 08-10-2009 04:09 PM
Ouch I am a dork & burnt my lips with battery acid KiwiRyder General Off Topic Discussion 3 09-16-2008 10:57 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0