Overreaching TB and Nutrition.
 
 

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Overreaching TB and Nutrition.

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  • Horse over reaching help
  • Horse heavy on forehand overreaching

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  • 2 Post By deserthorsewoman

 
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    03-16-2013, 03:07 PM
  #1
Foal
Overreaching TB and Nutrition.

Hi everyone,

I have 2 questions:

1.) Ok, I have a TB that is either a real clumsy horse, or just pushes his hind legs way too far forward and causing wounds on his pasterns. It's not too bad but he could hurt himself sooner or later and I am worried about him.

So, I know the general thing would be to put something on it like the overreaching boots or the overreaching ring but I want to know if there is a way that I can stop him from overreaching his legs without having to rely on protection. I'll happily put it on him but I want to stop the overreaching.

Any tips?

2.) So I would like to work up my TB's condition as he is losing condition from coming off the track. What should I give him(be general in type of food or supplement because we may not have the brands here) and what should get him back into working condition nicely?

Also, how can I help my TB to build some nice muscling?

Thank you very much for your time and patience.

~SATR
     
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    03-16-2013, 03:12 PM
  #2
Showing
Overreaching is caused by conformation and can't be "fixed." Putting overreach boots (or another type of protection) is the best solution.

As for your second question...is he losing weight or just muscle? If he's losing muscle, putting him back into work slowly will help him gain the correct muscling. If he's losing actual weight, his diet needs to be reevaluated completely.
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    03-17-2013, 11:01 AM
  #3
Yearling
Overreaching can be protected by bells etc. We had this one horse at training - he was overreaching and clashing his shoes together all the time when at work - he had all 4 leg guards and all 4 bells.
Now, he only clashes his feet when not asked to work properly, he is very heavy on the forehand, but active in the behind, so his hind legs are doing it right, but he hasn't figured out completely yet how to immediately lift off front, or the rider cannot ask for it. The trainer rides him without crazy noises. He does compete in dressage and jumping, low levels - in dressage no bells for the show - but no injuries either.

If the horse does it on his own too, always put leg guards and bells on for turnout, we do that for shod horses anyway..

For part 2)
Ad lib hay and water, salt/mineral block, and maybe a bit of high fibre and protein, but low on cereals and molasses mix - feed oil seed meals, sugarbeat pulp, can add some oil, make sure vit& min are enough.
Cereal grain only for fast release energy if needed.
To build muscle - lots of long&low lunge work and free movement. When he feels strong enough, ride long and low, work with transitions etc - muscles get build with more work, relaxed work, than just feeding ofc :P
     
    03-17-2013, 11:50 AM
  #4
Trained
Hooves: have a competent farrier/ barefoot trimmer take a look. Hind toes could possibly shortened/squared a bit. And protection for the fronts.
It's most likely conformation anyway, a horse with a long overreaching walk has an excellent canter/galopp.

Nutrition: if he's straight of the track, he needs to be let down slowly. Less grain over time, more hay free choice, expect some weight/muscle loss, it's normal. He'll go through a detox- phase, sort of. Aim for free choice hay/ grass, and rather fat- energy than starch- energy. Lucerne pellets, soaked, ricebran or oil as fat source. A good vitamin/mineral supplement, sufficient protein, salt, fresh water, and turnout. Work him lightly at first, until he's through with the detox( he will smell different).
picup436 and Cherrij like this.
     

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