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Pasture...HELP!!!

This is a discussion on Pasture...HELP!!! within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
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        02-20-2010, 05:53 AM
      #21
    Yearling
    We have about 1.5 acres fenced off in two sections with 8 horses. No poop problems or fly problems. Our only issue is with grass, but even with only 2-3 horses on it the soil here refuses to grow grass. It's extremely rocky and partially and shale pit.

    Also, is there any way you can turn the horse back out after dinner? It would be much happier and healthier with as much turnout as possible.
         
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        02-20-2010, 08:59 AM
      #22
    Yearling
    Lol! I know, I am just a goof and am afraid it will get attaked by something overnight. The coyote population is rising in our area a lot.
         
        02-20-2010, 09:43 AM
      #23
    Green Broke
    Wanna - a healthy adult horse is really not at any risk to coyotes. Don't get me wrong, I do understand your worry because it is something that my own daughter voiced when we first brought her horse home (we have a creek bed regularly run by various carnivores, including a nice pack of coyotes). The only time we had real worry was last year when there was a large cat that was picking off cattle in the surrounding fields. He/she faded off after a month or so and hasn't been seen sense, but it was disconcerting to say the least. In the long run, turnout is a very healthy - both physically and mentally - thing for the horse, it's what they are designed for.
    Since you would be starting from a blank slate, I would design your set up to allow turnout with free access to a shelter -whether it's an outside entrance to their stall left open or a run in separate from the barn (we have both).
    We now have the two horses here and they really enjoy being able to decide for themselves when they want to be in a shelter and when they want to be out - and it is usually exactly the opposite of what we humans would choose for them.
         
        02-20-2010, 10:24 AM
      #24
    Foal
    I reccomend a few AWESOME books if you can find them at the library, or better yet, buy them cheap online (cus they will ALWAYS come in handy) I have these three and they REALLY are informative:

    Everything from pasture management to trailers:


    Tractors and other machinery and equipment, their uses and how to maintain them:


    A month to month guide for all year round care and routines you should know about for your farm and horse care (also talks about predators):


    Good luck! Looks like you are asking the right questions to be a great horse owner :)

    ~Al615
         
        02-20-2010, 10:25 AM
      #25
    Yearling
    I will definetley keep that in mind! Thanks guys!
         
        02-20-2010, 10:26 AM
      #26
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppyLover615    
    I reccomend a few AWESOME books if you can find them at the library, or better yet, buy them cheap online (cus they will ALWAYS come in handy) I have these three and they REALLY are informative:

    Everything from pasture management to trailers:


    Tractors and other machinery and equipment, their uses and how to maintain them:


    A month to month guide for all year round care and routines you should know about for your farm and horse care (also talks about predators):


    Good luck! Looks like you are asking the right questions to be a great horse owner :)

    ~Al615
    I will add those to my"books to get" list:) I have the horse-keeping on a small acerage one..I love that book! I have read it a thousand times!LOL
         
        02-20-2010, 05:08 PM
      #27
    Foal
    Smile

    Wannahorse,
    You have gotten some very good ideas from others. I'll add that horses are very active at night if you allow them to be out. They don't sleep eight hours in a row like humans. They have very good night vision. Horses are saner and healthier if allowed room to move 24/7. Movement is necessary for their digestive tract to work properly.

    Can you create a paddock (smaller area that the horse(s) will eventually strip of grass) with the run in? A dry lot will allow you to close off the pasture if you need to, but allow the horse to move in a larger area than a stall. A paddock can be used for double duty, such as a round pen or riding ring. You will have to pick up the manure before riding.

    Link below is a 'thinking outside of the box' site that is an alternative to pastures. It is based upom the movements and culture of wild horses. While life-time equestrains may poo-poo the idea, I believe it has merit. It works for smaller acreages to create movement.
    Slow Feeding Horses on Paddock Paradise Tracks - Paddock Paradise Wiki

    Keep asking questions, and work with an instructor or trainer before your purchase. You might contact your County Extension office about pasture management in your area. I say might, because some county Extension services are very knowledgeable about agriculture, but not about equestrian issues.

    Have you worked on a monthly budget for the horse? That in itself would be a good question to post.
         
        02-20-2010, 05:20 PM
      #28
    Yearling
    Excellent advice on here, you seem very responsible and willing to ask for and take advice. You will make an excellent horse owner. On the goat topic- let your dad know they can be little monsters (as one of my professors says, that is why they are the sign of the devil!). Mine used to get out of the pasture and dance on my car hood a lot, and eat the garden, and the horses' tails. But I've had some that were well mannered and stuck with their horse buddies all day causing no trouble. They'd be in more danger from coyotes though, than your horse. A lot of people have them to protect valuable sheep as the goats faint when a predator comes, the predator eats the goat and the sheep are safe.
         
        02-20-2010, 05:27 PM
      #29
    Banned
    ^^^wow, harsh! Poor little goatys! Lol
         
        02-20-2010, 06:11 PM
      #30
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tealamutt    
    excellent advice on here, you seem very responsible and willing to ask for and take advice. You will make an excellent horse owner. On the goat topic- let your dad know they can be little monsters (as one of my professors says, that is why they are the sign of the devil!). Mine used to get out of the pasture and dance on my car hood a lot, and eat the garden, and the horses' tails. But I've had some that were well mannered and stuck with their horse buddies all day causing no trouble. They'd be in more danger from coyotes though, than your horse. A lot of people have them to protect valuable sheep as the goats faint when a predator comes, the predator eats the goat and the sheep are safe.
    Thats the first time on this forum that someone told me I would be a good horse owner! You made me very happy! Lol!
         

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