Permanently lame horse?
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Permanently lame horse?

This is a discussion on Permanently lame horse? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • How to help a horse that is permanently lame
  • Rehoming a permanently lame horse

Like Tree2Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-18-2013, 10:22 AM
  #1
Foal
Permanently lame horse?

I was contacted last night and asked if I would like to take in a 7 month old colt lame from birth in his back leg. He can walk fine but can't run. Tonight I will be getting more details over the phone but would like to get your advice on what questions I should be asking. Next year I plan to open a very small livestock and senior dog rescue and would love to have him but I don't want to be tricked into a lifetime of vet bills.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-18-2013, 10:27 AM
  #2
Green Broke
Regardless of his lameness issue - if you take him on you will have a "lifetime of vet bills", just as you would with any animal. Are you thinking specifically of bills that would be related to any issues associated with this specific lameness - if so, you would need to have a vet examine him and give you their opinion on the long-term expenses you might expect to encounter.
     
    01-18-2013, 10:32 AM
  #3
Foal
Specifically related to the lameness and extensive vet bills as a result.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    01-18-2013, 10:52 AM
  #4
Started
Unfortunately this sounds like a horse that would be better off being euthanized rather than having a life of misery.
BigBenLoverforLife likes this.
     
    01-18-2013, 10:55 AM
  #5
Foal
Is there a way to know if he's in pain? They were rather nonchalant about it. It's a hip issue.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    01-18-2013, 11:41 AM
  #6
Yearling
Sounds like what I've seen happen to a dairy Calf last spring. The poor guy looked perfect but when he went to try to walk he stumbled a lot until her got used to his weird hips where his back right didn't quite fit into the socket right but, was never close to being able to use his legs fully ... He spent most of his time lying down unless someone came to feed him his milk... He ended up being veal unfortunately but, in the long run it was probably for the best he didn't have to suffer any longer.
     
    01-18-2013, 11:42 AM
  #7
Yearling
I have a mare that broke her shoulder at 4 months old was put in a box stall that was 6 by 8 for 8 months, her shoulder healed fine but because of not being able to move around her other front leg has serious issues, she will never be sound to ride, but she is not in pain, and gets around just fine, she can run and play. When I got her, her knees were the size of cantaloupes and she could barely get around, I basically got her to put her down, but after a few weeks of good feeding and open spaces her knees went down and she could move more freely, she had to learn how to run again, and stop, she fell on her face several times learning to stop and turn. She shows no sign of any pain.

If he's been that way since birth is it possible that his hip dislocated during the birth process and maybe it can be popped back in? It's up to you if you want to try to help this horse or not, but go in with the mindset of yes there will be vet bills. Is this little guy happy and health besides his hip issue?
themacpack likes this.
     
    01-18-2013, 11:44 AM
  #8
Foal
See that's just sad and the last thing I want to see. I just wasnt sure if lame always meant pain. Il ask to speak to their vet or if they haven't had one out bring one with.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    01-18-2013, 11:48 AM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmarie    
I have a mare that broke her shoulder at 4 months old was put in a box stall that was 6 by 8 for 8 months, her shoulder healed fine but because of not being able to move around her other front leg has serious issues, she will never be sound to ride, but she is not in pain, an gets around just fine, she can run and play. When I got her, her knees were the size of cantaloupes and she could barely get around, I basically got her to put her down, but after a few weeks of good feeding and open spaces her knees went down and she could move more freely, she had to learn how to run again, and stop, she fell on her face several times learning to stop and turn. She shows no sign of any pain.


If he's been that way since birth is it possible that his hip dislocated during the birth process and maybe it can be popped back in? It's up to you if you want to try to help this horse or not, but go in with the mindset of yes there will be vet bills. Is this little guy happy and health besides his hip issue?
That's the kind of situation I can work with. I haven't spoken too in depth with them yet, they are calling me tonight, I don't have first hand experience with injuries or conditions like this and wanted to make sure I all the right questions.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    01-18-2013, 12:16 PM
  #10
Yearling
He may not be in any pain just not rideable.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Maybe permanently unrideable? HELP hellothere Horse Health 33 01-03-2013 06:38 PM
My horse + osteoarthritis = permanently lame? NEED ADVICE. hellothere Horse Health 0 12-01-2012 08:35 PM
Does it sound like I need to think about retiring her permanently? Britt Horse Talk 9 05-29-2012 11:54 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0