Please answer my question?!?!?!?!
   

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Please answer my question?!?!?!?!

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  • When given a recombitek vaccine is a booster shot absolutely necessary
  • Recombitek threads

 
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    08-29-2008, 01:11 AM
  #1
Foal
Please answer my question?!?!?!?!

What worming and vaccination schedule do you have your horse on...whats the climate like as far as winters summers fall spring....???? Im trying to figure out what kind of schedule I should put my horses on. We are moving to the rainy side of the state where it pretty much rains all year. They will be mostly eating off the ground in their stalls which are matts. PLEASE LET ME KNOW WHAT YOU THINK. Im not big on over vaccination or worming only want to give what is absolutely necessary.
     
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    08-29-2008, 05:16 AM
  #2
Foal
You're supposed to get a fecal egg count done to determine your worming schedule.
I wish there was a set schedule that would work according to your location, but appearantly there isn't.
I would talk to your vet.
     
    08-29-2008, 07:30 AM
  #3
Started
Mine all get "Spring" shots normally about April then wormed according to whicheve wormer I used each "drug" works for a certain time adn you need to follow those guidlelines

If you leave where mosquitoes are heavy be sure to get the West Nile vaccine and if using Fort Dodge they need that vaccine TWICE a year... save yourself some money adn use the Prevenile instead
     
    08-29-2008, 08:18 AM
  #4
Yearling
Shots:
Core vaccines that all horses should have at least once a year are EEE, WEE, WNV, Tetanus and Rabies EEE, WEE, WNV should be given in the spring prior to the onset of mosquito season to allow the horse's body to build a good resistance before the mosquitos start biting. And you do not have to give the Fort Dodge WNV vaccine twice a year....it is proven effective for a full year. It is recommended that horses in areas where there is a long mosquito season (like in Texas, Lousiana, etc) where mosquitos are seen all year round that horses be boostered for WNV at 6 months intervals--this is no matter which WNV vaccine you use.

Risk based vaccines are those which are recommended based upon your horse's specific situation--age, use, living arrangements. These are Rhino (EHV), Influenza, Strangles, Potomac Horse Fever, etc. The use of these is based upon risk of exposure.

Deworming:
You really need to assess YOUR horse's situation both by looking at risk factors like age, diet, management of the areas he is kept in, etc and by assessing what kind of worm burden he tends to carry--some horses are more susceptible to parasites than others. You should start by having a fecal egg count done (be sure the Egg Reappearance Period has passed for the last drug you used) to see what kind of load he is carrying and assess his risks of continued reinfection to decide if you should deworm currently and when you should reassess or retreat.
Appropriate strategic deworming programs are the way to go to minimize the risk of heavy parasitism and to help slow the developement of chemical resistant parasites.
If you haven't already read it, I've posted a long-winded post on deworming several times. You can find it on this thread:
http://www.horseforum.com/viewtopic....ight=deworming

Basically, you need to get your vet involved and discuss with him the specifics of your situation to work out a plan that fits your horse's needs.

If you can answer the questions in my long post I linked to, I can help you try to work out something to discuss with your vet.
     
    08-29-2008, 08:38 AM
  #5
Started
http://www.aaep.org/images/files/Adu...revised108.pdf

Here is the CURRENT info from the AAEP :) I try to keep UPDATED on it and which vaccinces NEED a booster and which ones don't why waste money ;)
     
    08-29-2008, 09:10 AM
  #6
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryle

Basically, you need to get your vet involved and discuss with him the specifics of your situation to work out a plan that fits your horse's needs.
You can get a lot of suggestions from horseman in all areas of the country much of which may not pertain to your area or situation; but as Ryle suggested , ask a reputable large animal vet in the area you are going to. The vet will know what your horse is at risk for and how to prevent it and what schedule to use.
     
    08-29-2008, 09:10 AM
  #7
Yearling
"When using the inactivated or the
recombinant product, consider 6-month
Revaccination interval for:
1) Horses residing in endemic areas
2) Juvenile (<5 yrs of age)
3) Geriatric horses (> 15 yrs of age)
4) Immunocompromised horses"---quoted from the AAEP website article

"Recombinant DNA is the general name for taking a piece of one DNA, and and combining it with another strand of DNA. Thus, the name recombinant! Recombinant DNA is also sometimes referred to as "chimera." By combining two or more different strands of DNA, scientists are able to create a new strand of DNA.
The most common recombinant process involves combining the DNA of two different organisms." --http://www.rpi.edu/dept/chem-eng/Biotech-Environ/Projects00/rdna/rdna.html


Prevenile is a recombinant vaccine. ("Chimera" is another term for recombinant.) So is the Recombitek WNV vaccine. The Fort Dodge vaccine is an inactivated vaccine. So all 3 on the market fall into the "consider boostering in these situations" category.
The recommendation is not because of the vaccine's qualities but because of endemic risk and patient response to vaccine and immune function.
     
    08-29-2008, 11:38 AM
  #8
Foal
Hi Impressive Berlin, where bouts are you moving to?I live in Enumclaw.It is wet over here in the wnter but it doesnt rail ALL the time LOL.It just seems like it!
Im no expert but I bet if you fed off the ground it would help.I throw hay out on the ground too but I also have hay mangers in their stalls. Good luck on the move.
     
    08-29-2008, 10:54 PM
  #9
Started
I would ask the local residents in the place that you are moving to recommend a good vet. Then I would pay him/her a visit and get that information and it would be a big plus in case of emergency so that you don't have to randomly call vets.
     

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