Please Help! Lame horse, constantly throwing shoes, horrible hooves, help!
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Please Help! Lame horse, constantly throwing shoes, horrible hooves, help!

This is a discussion on Please Help! Lame horse, constantly throwing shoes, horrible hooves, help! within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Can throwing a shoe make horse lame

Like Tree6Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-29-2013, 04:34 AM
  #1
Foal
Please Help! Lame horse, constantly throwing shoes, horrible hooves, help!

Hi guys,
I'm new here, I actually signed up just because I'm so desperately searching for answers that I decided to post here and see if anyone had any tips. I ride a horse, Bubba, who is not mine but might as well be. His owner lives very far away, pays for his feed and board but hardly rides. He's not uncaring, he just doesn't know much... Anyway, I'm in love with this boy, have been since the second I met him. He's an 8yo massive 16+hh paint ex reining horse, super smart and driven but like an ADHD child in a horse's body. We have been doing so well with training, he has completely blossomed. I had been working with him on trail until he began throwing shoes every other week. His hooves were getting so short I decided to just let him go barefoot so that his hooves could grow out and only ride him in the soft arena until I could find a solution, but the problem has only gotten worse. Now, he is lame and his hooves are cracked pretty badly. His owner says he can't go barefoot or else he instantly goes lame.

Now, because this isn't my horse I really don't have a say in who his vet and farrier are. I know this problem may be just a bit out of the ranch farrier's expertise but she is a family friend and...well, that's just not going to end well so before I go blaming her skills, I'm searching for another solution. I've bought a biotin supplement plus some flaxsnax with biotin and I'm going to start treating his hooves with a topical hoof treatment as much as I possibly can. But the biotin stuff is currently en route in the mail.

Is there anything specific I should try, any wonder treatment or product? The poor guy is limping so badly that I can't exercise him so we have been doing trick training (no riding or much walking) so he will have some form of stimulation, but I can tell he needs more. He's incredibly high energy and he needs exercise! I'm just at a complete loss. I'm pretty advanced in my riding and training abilities, however I know only the basics, hardly even that, about hoof care. Usually, I tell my clients when there's a problem and the vet and/or farrier work it out but that's not possible in this situation since the owner knows like...nothing aside from how to stay on, and that his horse needs to eat every day.

If you guys have any tips please send them my way. I'll take anything I can get.

Thanks, and thanks from Bubba too :)
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    07-29-2013, 04:45 AM
  #2
Weanling
Have you put the shoes back on? Going barefoot is a process that is not always so simple as pulling the shoes. You have to consider the horse (does he have good feet? Has he been barefoot before?), the terrain you ride, every bit of footing he steps on and utmost listen to the horse. Shoe him or boot him (easyboots are great) to relieve his pain. You can always use overreach boots to avoid the pulled shoes.

Can you post photos of his feet?
     
    07-29-2013, 04:48 AM
  #3
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by existentialpony    
Have you put the shoes back on? Going barefoot is a process that is not always so simple as pulling the shoes. You have to consider the horse (does he have good feet? Has he been barefoot before?), the terrain you ride, every bit of footing he steps on and utmost listen to the horse. Shoe him or boot him (easyboots are great) to relieve his pain. You can always use overreach boots to avoid the pulled shoes.

Can you post photos of his feet?
Most of all you have to consider the horses diet which is crucial to barefoot success.
     
    07-29-2013, 01:39 PM
  #4
Weanling
You could try fitting him in Easyboots with pads if you really want to go barefoot. Keeping a horse barefoot requires a different trim than your farrier is probably doing, however. A hoof supplement is a good start,but maybe you need to look at his overall diet. It would be easier to help if we could see his feet.
     
    07-29-2013, 03:42 PM
  #5
Trained
I'd recommend getting him some soft ride boots. They really are fantastic for transitioning to barefoot and are what I use on my international horse, who is barefoot.
Feed will also help, but nothing beats an excellent farrier. Talk to a good high performance vet and get a farrier recommendation and see if your farrier and the new one would be willing to work together. Think of it as a learning experience!
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    07-30-2013, 09:24 AM
  #6
Foal
I've been transitioning from shoes to barefoot for almost 2 years. And after finding a barefoot trim specialist, it has gotten better faster. I understand not being able to switch farriers, so my two suggestions are this: don't trim the sole and round the edges. Rounded edges don't chip. The sole needs to harden and callus. Definitely invest in boots in the mean time!! Good luck
     
    07-30-2013, 09:45 AM
  #7
Yearling
It takes from 6 months to 2 years to transition from shoes to barefoot. In the mean time, keep his feet well trimmed, and either put the shoes back on or use hoof boots.
If you put the shoes back on, put on over reach boots to stop him pulling shoes.
     
    07-30-2013, 12:13 PM
  #8
Showing
Do you have (or can you get) good pictures of his hooves? It's possible that the farrier may not be very good.
     
    07-31-2013, 09:41 PM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by YShennanBot    
Hi guys,
I'm new here, I actually signed up just because I'm so desperately searching for answers that I decided to post here and see if anyone had any tips. I ride a horse, Bubba, who is not mine but might as well be. His owner lives very far away, pays for his feed and board but hardly rides. He's not uncaring, he just doesn't know much... Anyway, I'm in love with this boy, have been since the second I met him. He's an 8yo massive 16+hh paint ex reining horse, super smart and driven but like an ADHD child in a horse's body. We have been doing so well with training, he has completely blossomed. I had been working with him on trail until he began throwing shoes every other week. His hooves were getting so short I decided to just let him go barefoot so that his hooves could grow out and only ride him in the soft arena until I could find a solution, but the problem has only gotten worse. Now, he is lame and his hooves are cracked pretty badly. His owner says he can't go barefoot or else he instantly goes lame.

Now, because this isn't my horse I really don't have a say in who his vet and farrier are. I know this problem may be just a bit out of the ranch farrier's expertise but she is a family friend and...well, that's just not going to end well so before I go blaming her skills, I'm searching for another solution. I've bought a biotin supplement plus some flaxsnax with biotin and I'm going to start treating his hooves with a topical hoof treatment as much as I possibly can. But the biotin stuff is currently en route in the mail.

Is there anything specific I should try, any wonder treatment or product? The poor guy is limping so badly that I can't exercise him so we have been doing trick training (no riding or much walking) so he will have some form of stimulation, but I can tell he needs more. He's incredibly high energy and he needs exercise! I'm just at a complete loss. I'm pretty advanced in my riding and training abilities, however I know only the basics, hardly even that, about hoof care. Usually, I tell my clients when there's a problem and the vet and/or farrier work it out but that's not possible in this situation since the owner knows like...nothing aside from how to stay on, and that his horse needs to eat every day.

If you guys have any tips please send them my way. I'll take anything I can get.
I'm just curious about the bold. If you know you aren't supposed to have any say in his hoof care, why did you take his shoes off? Did you even consult the owner?

I live far from my horse, and my friend looks after my horse. If she had done what you did, I would kill her (Sorry Amanda )

Now it sounds as though his feet are in bad health, likely trimmed too short, and possibly not strong enough to be without the support shoes provide.

For pulling his shoes off, my horse did that when the farrier set them back to encourage his heels to come down. He had to wear over reach boots 24/7 and even then sometimes he got them off.

My advice? Find a different farrier and get some shoes back on him to where he is comfortable. As for his foot health, the best thing to do is talk to the owner about putting him on a hoof supplement.

Now I'm saying this all without any pictures of his feet, so I could be wrong.

But in future, do not make any decisions concerning this horse without consulting and getting approval from the owner.
RandysWifey likes this.
     
    08-01-2013, 10:29 AM
  #10
Foal
I have to agree with Maggie on this, I am her friend that looks after her baby. And I would NEVER make any decisions-whether it be hoof care, saddles, training, supplements, etc. . . Without consulting her. Even if I pay for the item out of my own pocket, Bottom line is-she's the owner and footing the bills. If I don't like it, then it's time for me to buy my own horse. If you think the owner doesnt know much then I would sit down and discuss what you want to do and your reasoning. If he disagrees then you have a couple choices 1-stop working with the horse. 2-offer to buy the horse and foot the bills yourself 3-find a different lease situation.

On the subject of his hooves-I would get shoes on him ASAP and pray the owner of the horse doesnt find out and that you didnt do any perm. Damage (which you would be responsible for paying for if the owner did not give permission to remove the shoes). Then consult a Vet on the best way to get the horse barefoot.

But girl-I have to warn you-you're playing with fire doing stuff without the owners permission.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Glue on horse shoes for horses with damaged hooves TW1991 Horse Health 3 07-06-2013 05:13 AM
Constantly forging/hitting herself + really chippy hooves? Wallaby Hoof Care 5 07-16-2012 09:03 PM
hooves in horrible condition, what to do? HollyBubbles Horse Health 17 01-25-2012 04:12 PM
Horrible hooves Gidget Horse Health 10 08-12-2010 03:25 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0