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Pony foal with very this and soft ligaments

This is a discussion on Pony foal with very this and soft ligaments within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        11-02-2011, 09:35 AM
      #31
    Weanling
    It's an emotional subject but the emotions are largely human, not horse.

    As a farrier, I frequently see horses whose market value cannot justify the veterinary/farrier costs to save. Still, people spend the money because of their personal attachment to the animal. I also see a lot of horses that can and probably should be saved with proper care but, the owners simply won't invest the money.

    I learned long ago that any recommendation for euthanasia is a private discussion best left between the owner and their vet. At most, and if asked directly, I might offer a personal prognosis opinion but even then, I'll qualify that offering by first reminding the owner that I am not a vet.

    Cherie is upset that so many owners are being "forced" to send their sound horses off to the kill pen auctions while this owner (Donut) spends thousands trying to save a dwarf mini. Remember that no one is being "forced" to sell their horse due to hay shortages in the American south. Yes, hay is scarce and expensive, but there are options. Owners are buying hay from out of state and having it shipped in by the truckload. The decision to sell these sound horses is not forced; it's a financial choice. My own area suffered a drought a few years ago and we saw the same thing going on. To feed my own horses, I paid a premium to have a truckload of hay shipped in from Wisconsin. I also supplemented with a forage extender feed. It cost a fortune that year but at no time did anyone "force" me to sell a horse to the kill pens.

    Horses don't get to pick their owners and buying/acquiring a horse is a choice that comes with a lot of financial responsibility. People rage at those who do not or cannot meet that responsibility (neglect). We even legislate that responsibility. Still, sound horses go to slaughter and we give those owners a "pass". We say they did the "right thing". Can't afford to care for your horse?... no problem, just sell them at the kill pen. Shed a tear or two as you pull the saddle so everyone understands how heartbroken you are at the "forced" choice. Trouble is, it wasn't forced. Never was. What happened is that someone made a conscience choice to acquire a horse when they were financially incapable of dealing with the potential costs of owning that animal.

    We can, should and do legislate the obvious neglect/abuse of an animal. What we cannot do is legislate the freedom of property choice and it's disposal. Nor can we legislate what a person chooses to do with their money, excepting those financial responsibilities mandated by law. Horse are, by definition, livestock. That means they are property with no rights beyond those governing abuse/neglect/transport. What the lady in Romania chooses to do with her livestock or her money is frankly, her choice and her business. Just as much as the non-forced "choice" of someone in Oklahoma to sell their sound horse at a kill pen.

    I have a hard time criticizing an owner willing to spend hundreds or even thousands of dollars to save their pet (regardless how hopeless) when so many others are willing to dump their own, sound horses at the kill auctions for a couple hundred bucks. Where's the outrage at those folks? Why should someone like Donut's owner feel bad because she didn't step up and take on the kill pen sellers responsibility to care for their own horses?

    Most horseman know that the prognosis for a dwarf mini isn't good. Neither are the odds in favor of a horse with bilateral laminitic solar penetration, colic related intestinal rupture, severe limb fractures or dozens of other pathologies. Still, vet clinics and farriers are busy trying to meet the owner's choice to save those animals.

    It's an easy thing to armchair quarterback a euthanasia recommendation from the relative comfort of an internet forum. It's something entirely else when you're up close and personal with the animal and their owner.

    Feel strongly about sound horses going to the kill pens? Fine, follow your heart (and your pocketbook) and do what you think is best. You might even encourage others to do the same. Tell another owner they should kill their possibly hopeless case and use the money to save a better prospect? Where does that come from?

    In the end, none of it is as "heartless" as it appears on the surface. Why? Because the horse doesn't "care". He doesn't "care" because he doesn't know. He has no concept of "tomorrow". His survival is instinctual without the burden of worrying about what will happen tomorrow or even in the next hour. For a horse (or any animal), the concept of death as we know it is generally foreign. They have no sense of their own mortality beyond instinctive survival. It's a blessing that humans gave up in exchange for our ability to reason. Perhaps we got the short end of the stick in that deal.

    A vet won't make a euthanasia recommendation over the internet. There's good reason for that and horse owners should take note.

    Is Donut's case hopeless? That's a discussion best held between Donut's owner and a vet. Should the owner invest her money in a more hopeful prospect that needs saving? It's an irrelevant question.

    One might just as well ask, should horse owners stop putting so much money into the care of their animals and use that money to save starving children in third world countries? How's that for a test of your personal sense of morality?

    Cheers,
    Mark
         
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        11-22-2011, 11:56 AM
      #32
    Foal
    Hy again! I just wanted you to know that 2 days ago I removed the fyberglass boots and I can say that he is much better. Maybe for some of you it might be a paradox but he's feet look much better...he was standing all by himself ..of course he still has no power to stay by his own because he doesnt have the muscles for that but we will work at this problem. The ligaments obviously look stronger because his left foot is straight and he puts it corectly...but the problem is still at the right foot...we will make him a silicon shoe to make him walk on his entire hoof...and put him again some fyberglass....
         
        11-22-2011, 12:15 PM
      #33
    Foal
    I think it's a great thing you are doing. Your giving this little guy a chance when most wouldn't. I commend you and as long as your farrier and vet are giving you the thumbs up then so will I.

    It's not about saving as many horses as you can and it's not about euthanising the weak and saving those "worth saving" it's about giving an animal a chance to survive. Most would have put him down, but obviously she saw something in him and he has the will so I believe it's worth a fighting chance.
    mvinotime likes this.
         
        11-22-2011, 12:23 PM
      #34
    Foal
    Well...this is what I believe too.that he deserve a chance...and maybe..maybe he will get one. What I forgot to say that the vet recommand to get him at a swiming pool...probably we will do that as soon as we find one that is agree with a horse in the water...
         
        11-23-2011, 06:53 AM
      #35
    Trained
    A racing stable might have a swimming pool specifically for swimming horses. Otherwise if you have access to a beach, dam or river that you can safely and legally take him to, that is also great.

    I still believe that this horse should be put down for his own sake, recovery from something as severe as his deformity is long and painful and the horse doesn't SEE "in 2 months I will be fine", it lives in the moment and if too much of its life is painful then the horse is suffering unfairly.

    You can put a horse, dog or cat through chemotherapy if it gets cancer, but that doesn't mean it's a good idea. Chemo is horrible and the effects last for quite some time. This is the same principle, though the circumstances are different - just because you CAN, doesn't mean you should.
    Kayty likes this.
         
        11-23-2011, 08:50 AM
      #36
    Foal
    I'm pretty sure that the op didn't get on here for people to tell her over and over to put him down. She knows your opinions. And that's fine but it doesn't need to be repeated every other post
         
        11-23-2011, 03:47 PM
      #37
    Foal
    Well...I already know some people idea of putting him down...and I am not going to repeat again and again why I decided to give him a chance.
         
        02-14-2012, 06:53 AM
      #38
    Foal
    Hi again! After few months of fighting and taking advices from many doctors,X-rays and a visit at Ullo Clinic in Hungary..last night we put him to sleep. It was a long fight and a very dificult one..but we tried to do the best for him...we gave him a chance...but he lost all his goodluck...I will miss him....and now..after all this fight..it was the best for him from this point..
         
        02-14-2012, 07:02 AM
      #39
    Green Broke
    The best thing for this poor little mite and should have been done months ago!
         
        02-14-2012, 07:19 AM
      #40
    Weanling
    I'm truly sorry that poor Donut was put to sleep... You did an amazing thing trying to save him and give him a chance at life, so I hope you can find some solace in that. I for one am always so grateful when I see someone put so much effort and money into saving one animal (especially when the whole world will tell you its not worth it).

    It gives me hope in mankind. You are a hero in many ways.

    Sorry I am getting soppy, I just wanted to send you my condolences.
         

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