Positive Coggins Test - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Positive Coggins Test

This is a discussion on Positive Coggins Test within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • ARE TRAILRIDING HORSES EXEMPT FROM GETTING COGGINS TESTED IN MICH
  • Can mare magic cause a positive coggins

Like Tree44Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    12-31-2012, 05:28 AM
  #11
Yearling
A lot of people who don't know/care don't get a coggins done around my area. They don't take the horses anywhere, or again, they just don't care and think that it's okay. I just have one pulled when I do spring vaccinations as a regular thing. Then again, the ones that don't pull coggins probably don't bother vaccinating either...
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    12-31-2012, 06:06 AM
  #12
Weanling
Dangerous...
Like a person not testing for HIV in a way.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    12-31-2012, 06:06 AM
  #13
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elizabethan87    
Lol it's not criminal behavior here Dolly DoGooder. And why are you on my post judging me? What are you, the Lorax for the law? Lmfao we drove an untagged, unregistered trailer too! Also had an untagged and untitled farm truck pulling it. And to top it off, we went 5 mph over the speed limit all the way home. While drinking moonshine and shooting our double barrel shotguns out the window screaming Yeehaw. More than half of that is true.
I'm concerned because I feel like it should have crossed my mind sooner, whats the point in giving the trainer my paperwork and not asking to see the ones on hers? Especially after reading that woman's heart felt story. When you hear about these things you start to wonder "what if". The same goes for my children, that incident in CT, I was worried to death about my child's life at a public school thousands of miles from that place. "What if"? In both situations, I wouldn't be able to bare it.
I didn't test him before I transported him home because he was in such bad shape I wasn't even waiting the 24 hours for a rushed coggins. I was getting him the f*** outta Dodge. The girl I bought him from only owned him a short time, she managed to provide him a worse living situation than where she got him from. And he was feral. So... I think you're a fool.
Posted via Mobile Device
Let me get this straight. You bought a horse in a bad circumstance, who had recently come from who knows where, from someone who had his a "short period of time". And horse is feral. This throws up so many red flags to me that I would not have brought this horse anywhere until I had arranged for a safe quarantine. It sounds quite possible this horse came from an auction, in which case, coggins is only ONE issue you should be worried about. I don't care how big the town is where you live, how much of a "redneck" (your term now mine) you are-that has nothing to do with your lack of common sense, or your attitude. And now, you have taken this horse to a trainer, who I am going to assume you trust, since they have your little pookie to train......and you are even thinking of questioning the EIA status of the rest of the horses there? Do you ask for vaccination proof of all of your kids classmates? Or do you have some level of trust that if the schools are making you get your kid vaccinated they do the same for the rest of the kids (sort of like your trainer probably asked for the same health info on all the other horses there? Get my drift? And you are actually calling another member a fool when you are called out? Wow. Pot-meet kettle.

Also, yes, Coggins testing is the law, and it has all but eliminated the disease. However, it truly does test one moment in time, sort of like HIV testing. Shoot a contaminated mosquito could be biting the horses butt while the blood was being drawn for all we know.
     
    12-31-2012, 08:35 AM
  #14
Green Broke
Wow....just, wow........the absolute hypocrisy of your attitude is what I can't get over.
     
    12-31-2012, 11:12 AM
  #15
Yearling
Hmmm, this post gets me thinking. Like I said, the word "Coggins" around here only comes up when crossing state lines. Of course, just to be safe, people who run big training facilities make sure the horses coming in don't have anything weird, but....

I've purchased and sold horses and we never had coggins tests.
I've moved to different boarding situations and they just had to be "current on vaccinations and worming", but no coggins test.
I've got to multiple shows and events and coggins was never mentioned.

Of course, I have always bought horses that were very healthy and came from situations with minimal risk. And I keep a conversation going with my vet at all times with lots of questions. If I were buying a horse from a questionable situation in questionable health, I would definitely have any tests done that I could.

I've never heard of any other laws around here regarding Coggins except the one about crossing state lines. I wonder if that's because there is no law or because it's one of those laws that's on the books, but no one follows or enforces it? I know Idaho can be lax on some other things - for instance it's super simple to get a brand inspection and horses don't have to be branded like I've heard they do in some other states. (A friend of mine had no proof of ownership except said she's a grade mare, my fiancÚ has owned her her whole life, and he says she's mine now - and with that, they gave her the brand inspection in her name!)

Could someone tell me about the coggins laws your state has (are there any federal ones?) and if you can enlighten me on what Idaho says (and Oregon, for that matter, too since I'm moving there and should probably know).
     
    12-31-2012, 11:28 AM
  #16
Green Broke
I don't know about other states but where I live, in order to transport a horse any amount of distance you must have a brand inspection and negative coggins (and carry the paperwork with you).

My gelding didn't have a current Coggins when I bought him, so I bought him contingent on a negative Coggins and the seller obtaining a Brand Inspection. Vet pulled the Coggins during his PPE, BI was done the next day. Vet faxed me his Coggins and I went and brought him home.

Way too many dishonest people out there, so I don't trust a seller about anything. Get a PPE done and a Coggins pulled at the same time. A Coggins is all of about $12 and I then know the horse was not infected between when the last one was done and my purchasing the horse.
     
    12-31-2012, 11:34 AM
  #17
Foal
Jillybean~ I found this for Oregon:
Oh, and Welcome to Oregon! I'm in Eastern.
Equidae includes horses, asses, donkeys, mules, and zebras. Basic requirements are:

  • Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) issued less than 30 days prior to entry
  • Import permit issued by this office. For a permit, the veterinarian or clinic staff calls 503-986-4679.
  • Negative test for Equine Infectious Anemia less than 6 months prior to entry. Tests with "pending" results are not acceptable. (Oregon will accept either the ELISA test or the AGID test (sometimes called a "Coggins test")

Exceptions - The following are exempt from the EIA test requirement:

1. Nursing foals under 6 months of age, traveling with negative tested dam
And
2. All Washington-resident horses
     
    12-31-2012, 11:35 AM
  #18
Green Broke


I have a coggins story to tell.

Years ago when the Coggins Test first came out (this was in the early 1970's) and was not widely used, my employer tested her mare. This mare was a really good black QH. The mare tested positive (and she was pregnant to My Bay Bailey).

She had her foal (Bailey Bay Sou) who was simply one of the best horses I have ever had the pleasure of handling (conformation AND training). The foal also tested Coggins Positive while she was nursing.. but 6 months after weaning she was NEGATIVE. She tested Negative the rest of her long life.

The mare, her dam, continued to test Positive. The owner of the Stallion would not breed his stud to her again after she did test positive and the mare ended up in a pasture with two other horses that were retired from hunter/jumper competition.

She lived well into her twenties with her two pasture mates. She always tested Coggins Positive.. and was not sick a day in her life. Her pasture mates tested Negative for the remainder of their lives as well. All three horses were put down and buried on that farm and all from the infirmities of Old Age. These horses were together for no less than 10 years with one being coggins positive and the other two coggins negative.

Yes. It is NOW the law to test before moving a horse and some states have stricter laws than others. Should you test a horse before buying OR shipping? Yes. Absolutely. Should you buy a Positive horse? IMO, no. TEST before BUYING. The OP should have tested this gelding before buying him (but that ship has sailed so no point in getting whipped up over it).

Should a horse be automatically put down for a positive test? Honestly? I can say I do not know.. probably yes if the horse is symptomatic or has shown the typical symptomatic cycles of the disease. Laws can require the horse be put down.

Would I expect every horse at a training facility to have coggins test on site? Yes. I would test my horse and ask politely about the others.

You do need to follow the law.. but I have yet to have anyone in this fight explain to me the scientific situation of Bailey Bay Sou's dam who tested positive, apparently did not transmit the disease and who's foal was positive while she had Mom's antibodies on board but who reverted to negative when those antibodies were cleared from her system.
     
    12-31-2012, 11:36 AM
  #19
Trained
NY statute:
95-c. Examination of horses for equine infectious anemia
1. The commissioner or his authorized agent may cause to be administered to any horse within the state any test he finds appropriate for ascertaining the presence or absence of equine infectious anemia, also known as "swamp fever." Upon order of the commissioner or his authorized agent, the owner, custodian or harborer of any horse shall confine, present, control and restrain such animal or animals for the examinations, tests and identification procedures the commissioner deems necessary and if exposure to equine infectious anemia is apparent, the commissioner shall order confinement for a period up to sixty days or until a negative test can be obtained. During the period of such test, and until the commissioner or his agent shall otherwise direct, the owner, custodian or harborer of any animal being tested shall keep such animal in segregation or confinement as the commissioner's agent shall direct, and no person shall remove a horse under test from the premises where the test is being conducted, nor remove from the horse, or alter or deface any temporary identification marks or devices affixed for the purpose of the test, except with the written consent of the commissioner's authorized agent.

2. (a) Any horse found by the commissioner after testing to be infected with equine infectious anemia may be freeze branded in a manner prescribed by the commissioner. Upon notification of the results of such test, the owner, custodian or harborer of any animal found by the commissioner to be infected with equine infectious anemia shall confine, present and restrain such animal for freeze branding by any duly authorized agent of the commissioner at such time as he may direct.
(b) Notwithstanding any other provisions of law, the owner, harborer or custodian of any horse freeze branded pursuant to this section shall not be indemnified for any loss in value of such animal.
(c) The term "horse" as used throughout this section shall apply to the entire family of equidae. The commissioner may by regulation exclude from the provisions of this section horses within defined age categories.

3. No person shall import or bring into the state any horse unless such horse has been tested for equine infectious anemia and reacted negatively within a period prior to entry, and in a manner, prescribed by the commissioner in regulations.

4. No person shall transport on any public highway within this state any horse unless such horse has been tested for equine infectious anemia and reacted negatively within a period prior to such transportation, and in a manner, prescribed by the commissioner in regulations.

5. No person shall sell, exchange, barter or give away any horse unless such horse has been tested for equine infectious anemia and reacted negatively within a period prior to such transfer of ownership, and in a manner, prescribed by the commissioner in regulations.

6. Subdivisions three, four and five of this section shall not apply to horses which are imported, sold, exchanged, bartered, given away or transported under permit from the commissioner or his authorized agent for immediate slaughter, research or such other purposes as the commissioner finds are consistent with the control and eradication of equine infectious anemia, as prescribed by the commissioner in regulations.

VA code: (I did not see anything about transporting in theirs)

All horses assembled at a show, fair, race meet, or other such function, or participating in any activity on properties where horses belonging to different owners may come into contact with each other in Virginia, must be accompanied by a report of an official negative test for equine infectious anemia. The test shall be conducted by an approved laboratory on a sample taken by an accredited veterinarian or a State-Federal Regulatory Veterinarian within 365 days prior to such event or activity. The person in charge will ensure that a copy of the official negative test results accompanies each horse in the event or activity, and shall make such reports available for inspection by a representative of the State Veterinarian upon request. The person in charge shall exclude any horse which is not accompanied by a negative test report.

I know in NY, VA and MD any shows I have ever been to it is required. And when we had a hunter pace at our farm-also required-by the insurance carrier. (as well as for clinics, etc)
     
    12-31-2012, 11:43 AM
  #20
Showing
In Virginia, the law states that you are to have a current, negative Coggins for every horse you take off the property, whether you're going 20 miles or across state lines. Every gathering, whether it's a trail ride, hunter pace, or show, requires proof of a negative Coggins. Maryland is the same way. I've lived and ridden in both states, so know the laws concerning negative Coggins for public venues. Even if it's a private ride, if it's on state property, you may be required to produce proof of negative Coggins or you can/will be reported.

I have 3 horses and 2 of them get Coggins pulled once a year. The oldster never leaves the property, so if the 2 younger horses test negative then I'm pretty secure in thinking the old guy is negative as well.

I do find it rather hypocritical that the OP didn't bother with any of that, but expects proof from the trainer that all the other animals at the facility have one on file.

As far as being 'redneck', that doesn't excuse anyone from what's required by law for the good of the majority. My old horse trailer sported a Farm Use tag the whole time I had it, but I never tried to take it across state lines or very far within the state. My current trailer is titled and tagged properly, as is my truck.
themacpack likes this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Coggins questions-test neg 1 yr ago-should I test before/after purchase? springles Horse Health 11 01-15-2012 11:42 AM
Coggins test online? momo3boys Horse Health 1 01-08-2011 09:19 AM
Coggins Test? purplefoal Horse Health 13 07-07-2010 06:57 PM
coggins test Pro Horse Breeding 15 01-26-2010 01:17 AM
coggins test sempre_cantando Horse Health 1 07-15-2008 07:30 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0