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Positive Coggins Test

This is a discussion on Positive Coggins Test within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • What medical screening do horses need when coming from out of state
  • We bought another horse do we need to get a coggins before putting him with the others

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    12-31-2012, 11:49 AM
  #21
Yearling
When I was little (like 5-6 yo) My dad used to take me with him to deliver medical equipement. There was this one older gentlemen (in his early 90's) that I loved to go see. He lived about 10 miles down a dirt road with nobody else in sight. He used to have a big beautiful black stud that was just as gentle as he could be but the horse stayed in a apple orchard. I remember here the guy telling my dad that the stud tested positive in the mid-70's when the horse was around 13 years old and that he had moved back on this piece of property with his horse and stayed because he was requested to put him down. In 1996 The old man I believe was 95 yo when he passed away and they said two days after he passed the horse laid down in the back of orchard and passed away at 31 yo.
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    12-31-2012, 11:52 AM
  #22
Foal
I do find it rather hypocritical that the OP didn't bother with any of that, but expects proof from the trainer that all the other animals at the facility have one on file.
[/QUOTE]

Can we just learn from this thread instead calling each other out? This is a great opportunity to learn from EVERYBODY.
     
    12-31-2012, 11:52 AM
  #23
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catpeedontherug    
Jillybean~ I found this for Oregon:
Oh, and Welcome to Oregon! I'm in Eastern.
Equidae includes horses, asses, donkeys, mules, and zebras. Basic requirements are:

  • Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) issued less than 30 days prior to entry
  • Import permit issued by this office. For a permit, the veterinarian or clinic staff calls 503-986-4679.
  • Negative test for Equine Infectious Anemia less than 6 months prior to entry. Tests with "pending" results are not acceptable. (Oregon will accept either the ELISA test or the AGID test (sometimes called a "Coggins test")

Exceptions - The following are exempt from the EIA test requirement:

1. Nursing foals under 6 months of age, traveling with negative tested dam
And
2. All Washington-resident horses
Yep, have all those done and ready to go! Except I was supposed to move them this month, so i'll have to get a new health cert. My vet is wonderful and put together my "moving packet" with everything I'll need so I just keep that safe until we're ready to go!

That's cool about Washington horses. I wonder if it goes the other way as well? I'll be in the Hermiston area, so I imagine we'll cross that border a few times. What about any other laws regarding purchasing, sending to a trainer, moving within state, etc? It seems from the other posts that other states have more laws...

What part of Eastern Oregon are you in?
     
    12-31-2012, 12:00 PM
  #24
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catpeedontherug    
Can we just learn from this thread instead calling each other out? This is a great opportunity to learn from EVERYBODY.
Who made you the Sunshine & Rainbows Police? It IS hypocritical of the OP to not do it herself, but expect it from everyone else. Your tut-tutting and shaking your finger is neither appreciated nor warranted.
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    12-31-2012, 12:02 PM
  #25
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catpeedontherug    
Can we just learn from this thread instead calling each other out? This is a great opportunity to learn from EVERYBODY.
I agree completely!

Honestly, I did not find the the OP hypocritical at ALL. Did anybody accusing her go back and read what she asked before judging?

Quote:
I sent my horse to a trainer recently, and furnished a negative coggins beforehand. Only today did it dawn on me, how irresponsible it was that I did not ask to see a current coggins on each of the horses at their location. Then I wondered, what really happens when a horse does get the disease?
She's not demanding to see a coggins of the other horses on the property - When she was required to show one when she took the horse to the trainer, it occurred to her that she should have asked for a coggins before purchasing the horse and admits that that was irresponsible.

I see no hypocrisy in that at all - just being open to learn and saying shame on me, then asking a question. Personally, I'm very grateful that she brought this up, because, as my prior posts state, I've never given coggins a second thought other than that it's required so I can move.
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    12-31-2012, 12:04 PM
  #26
Yearling
(At least, that's how I read it... If you are asking to see a current coggins of each of the horses at the trainer's location, then yes, that is a bit excessive and hypocritical)
     
    12-31-2012, 12:05 PM
  #27
Banned
Coggins tests are only required when transporting, and if you get pulled over and don't have paperwork, it's not a criminal offense here. They don't even ask for it. The only time you HAVE to show proof is when you cross state line, and you also have to have a health certificate. Same with any animal, I breed shetland sheepdogs, and the law requires me to have a health certificate for every pup I sell. EIA use to be a big deal many years ago when farming and agriculture was a larger part of the economy, horses were working animals. But it is almost completely wiped out, and you'll probably never come across an EIA positive horse in your life. And an EIA positive horse can live out its entire life, into it's 30's. I didn't even know much about it until my vet explained it, so in all honesty it wasn't a major concern. I bought him from a girl, no idea how but he had HUGE gashes all over him that were untreated and still bleeding, some scabbed and leaking fluid, and a bunch of giant holes. Because I live in a small town, people knew the horse, and told me a little about his owner history, he was brought from south FL to be a carriage horse and they couldn't tame him. Within a week of him being at my house he was easy to catch, bathe, brush, poke my fingers in his ears, and would jump right in the trailer. Within 6 months I was riding him bareback with a halter and lead rope, and so was my 5 y/o daughter. He has turned out to be the best horse I have ever owned in my life, and he's a 4 y/o! I found the trainer online and she had great reviews, she trains cutting horses. She came and picked him up, she's keeping him 2 months. I'm a very trusting person, I waited 2 weeks before I started howling up to check on him (texting her the whole time though for progress updates), and when I got there she put him in the round pen to warm him up and he went nuts and started bucking like crazy when she asked him to canter. Went on for 5 minutes straight!!!! I instantly got a bad vibe about her, she swore he never did that but my gut was telling me to get him outta there. I gave her the benefit of the doubt, he may have only been doing that because I was there and he wanted to play soccer. He had his eyes on me the whole time. At home, I'll grab the jolly ball or a soccer ball and chase him around, he runs and I throw the ball toward him and he will buck and kick it every time. He LOVES this game. Because he's so young, he's real playful, and every time I go in his pen to muck his stall he will pick the jolly ball up and swing it at me and start nudging me. So pretty much I have to stop what I'm doing and play. I've nevvvver owned another horse with as mic character as he's got, he's my Old Yeller!
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    12-31-2012, 12:15 PM
  #28
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    


I have a coggins story to tell.

Years ago when the Coggins Test first came out (this was in the early 1970's) and was not widely used, my employer tested her mare. This mare was a really good black QH. The mare tested positive (and she was pregnant to My Bay Bailey).

She had her foal (Bailey Bay Sou) who was simply one of the best horses I have ever had the pleasure of handling (conformation AND training). The foal also tested Coggins Positive while she was nursing.. but 6 months after weaning she was NEGATIVE. She tested Negative the rest of her long life.

The mare, her dam, continued to test Positive. The owner of the Stallion would not breed his stud to her again after she did test positive and the mare ended up in a pasture with two other horses that were retired from hunter/jumper competition.

She lived well into her twenties with her two pasture mates. She always tested Coggins Positive.. and was not sick a day in her life. Her pasture mates tested Negative for the remainder of their lives as well. All three horses were put down and buried on that farm and all from the infirmities of Old Age. These horses were together for no less than 10 years with one being coggins positive and the other two coggins negative.

Yes. It is NOW the law to test before moving a horse and some states have stricter laws than others. Should you test a horse before buying OR shipping? Yes. Absolutely. Should you buy a Positive horse? IMO, no. TEST before BUYING. The OP should have tested this gelding before buying him (but that ship has sailed so no point in getting whipped up over it).

Should a horse be automatically put down for a positive test? Honestly? I can say I do not know.. probably yes if the horse is symptomatic or has shown the typical symptomatic cycles of the disease. Laws can require the horse be put down.

Would I expect every horse at a training facility to have coggins test on site? Yes. I would test my horse and ask politely about the others.

You do need to follow the law.. but I have yet to have anyone in this fight explain to me the scientific situation of Bailey Bay Sou's dam who tested positive, apparently did not transmit the disease and who's foal was positive while she had Mom's antibodies on board but who reverted to negative when those antibodies were cleared from her system.
I agree with you. If that happened now that mare would have been killed. They 'say' that all positives are carriers but then they admit they aren't really sure as many cases like yours stated have popped up. It seems to me they are killing off the horses with the great immune systems that can easily fight off the disease.

Wisconsin doesn't require a Coggins test to move around within the state. Events require them but State owned land does not. We don't have to test.

'All barns were painted red because everyone painted their barns red so red paint was cheaper so everyone painted their barns red.'
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    12-31-2012, 12:17 PM
  #29
Green Broke
I just wish there was some science on this... because without science, my story is merely an anecdotal tale.
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    12-31-2012, 12:21 PM
  #30
Weanling
This is a really good topic!
     

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