Possible Laminitis - In need of info and encouragement - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 48 Old 06-17-2013, 03:25 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by spirit88 View Post
Control his diet like your doing and don't let him get any chubbier .. you caught it in time I think you should have a good out come.

Main thing is diet and good trims.
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The vet actually said he's in "normal" range, but it wouldn't hurt for him to lose 30-40 lbs either. Our bales are about 45-lb. bales and he's getting 1/4 bale/day, which my vet said would be good and said the bales I have are the kind I need to be feeding (Grass hay around here can be of spotty quality). Depending on how much all this ends up costing, I'll probably switch him to Purina Low Starch instead of the Triple Crown. I'm glad you think we caught it in time! I wish I'd had her out sooner, but I did the best I could with the information I had.
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post #32 of 48 Old 06-17-2013, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by greentree View Post
Does the new farrier not need X-rays to know if there is any rotation? Did the vet leave you a shoeing prescription?

I only ask because these things were requested the only time I ever dealt with a laminitis case. Maybe the vet doesn't feel there is any rotation...(answering my own question)

So sorry you and Flash are having to deal with this!!

Nancy
He didn't ask for them. He's also very experienced with laminitic horses. I don't cut corners when it comes to the professionals working with my baby - hence why I decided it'd be best to only have one horse instead of two.

The vet did say she didn't suspect rotation and didn't want to throw out the "F" word (which she says is just as bad as the other "F" word haha). She said shoes with wedges to get his feet of the ground would be best. I'll call and give her an update as well as ask for some clarification, but the farrier asked for a lot of the same information I gave my vet and it sounded like he knew exactly what needs to be done.
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post #33 of 48 Old 06-17-2013, 03:43 PM Thread Starter
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Not gonna lie, this is all kind of a big shock and I'm sick to my stomach over it, especially after hearing my dad's point of view :/ But, though he's capable of managing and riding a horse, I wouldn't exactly call him an expert nor a "best practice" person, either, and I'm willing to do a lot more with and for my horses. It's a labor of love for me.

At the same time, I'm not excited to share the details of how much this is all going to cost with my husband. He's so kind and supportive and deals with the horses and costs because he loves me, but he's not an animal person (much less a horse person!), so the $90 vet bill which included the coggins), plus I'm assuming $125-150 for the farrier is not going to be fun to spell out. For him, it's like a drop in the bucket for something non-essential because he doesn't really understand why I need to have a horse in the first place, but sucks it up so I'm happy. Such a wonderful man, but still not looking forward to this conversation.

And, most of all, the uncertainty of Flash's future :( I sure hope he's able to do as well as many of you are saying he could!
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post #34 of 48 Old 06-17-2013, 03:47 PM
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Please don't think you're horse is no longer going to be a success because he's had a bout of laminitis - careful management and he can be as good as ever once he's recovered
I'm afraid that grass becomes the enemy but once under control he can still spend time out in a muzzle or on a restricted regime.
Tripe Crown do a Safe Starch Forage which is ideal for him - it contains all the vitamins and minerals and nutrients with no added molasses, they also do a Molasses free pelleted feed in their Safe Starch range
My now old mare had a bad attack some years ago - she was fit and not overweight but was fed a sweet mix on the boarding/livery yard I was intending to keep her on through the winter. She made a complete recovery as far as her feet are concerned but will always have to be carefully managed
It could be at least a couple of weeks before you see signs of improvement
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post #35 of 48 Old 06-17-2013, 03:51 PM
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You will hate me for what I'm going to say now, I'm sure.

I WOULD NOT SHOE THIS HORSE.
I've never seen a horse healed from laminitis with shoes. More comfortable immediately, yes, but not HEALED.
I've seen plenty of horses completely sound and fully usable with the proper trimming and permanent change of diet and management. Horses who have been down for weeks. And I mean DOWN.
Especially with Flash, who is moving around voluntarily, even trotting....he's well on his way to health already.
I, personally, would get him on a 4;week trimming schedule, boot him for exercise, keep him outside 24/7, preferably with a herd or at least a buddy.

I also don't get it why x-rays are not necessary.......oh my, I wish I were close to you....:-/
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post #36 of 48 Old 06-17-2013, 07:09 PM Thread Starter
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The reason for the shoeing is for relief, not treatment. The vet, farrier, and barefoot trimmer all agree that it's best given our situation, which is that he is on HARD ground and it cannot be avoided. Ideally, he'd be in a stall with sand for support, but that's simply not an option. Given that he will be shipped to our new home in 6 weeks and enduring a 10-hour trailer ride, we're going to put him in shoes and keep him in them until we get to where we're going. Once there, we'll re-evaluate and hopefully go back to barefoot.

Luckily, the grass enemy is not a problem - we're moving to Las Vegas, so nothing even grows to snack on. As for as feed control goes, I couldn't ask for a better location haha.

My barefoot trimmer called and had a length discussion with me about what's going on and is completely on the same page with our treatment plan, the farrier I'm using, etc. And this is coming from a used-to-be-farrier turned barefoot trimmer that won't do shoes if at all possible - and it means she's giving up business for the sake of my horse. Moreover, she has a horse that has had laminitis so bad that he rotated and sank, which is 100 times worse than where Flash is at (per her words and having seen/done his feet only two weeks ago). However, with proper maintenance, he now does regular drill team practice and performance (not demanding at all, right?) and may go back to doing Limited Distance endurance rides once some other unrelated issues are cleared up. I feel lots better - with your stories and hers, it feels like a giant hug and everything will be fine :) I'll always have to be on top of his care and maintenance, but he'll be A-OK.
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post #37 of 48 Old 06-17-2013, 07:59 PM
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Okay, sounds reasonable.
BUT...let me tell you about shoeing a laminitic horse.....it HURTS.
Be prepared. Bute a day before and in shoeing day...means tonight, right?
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post #38 of 48 Old 06-17-2013, 08:02 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman View Post
Okay, sounds reasonable.
BUT...let me tell you about shoeing a laminitic horse.....it HURTS.
Be prepared. Bute a day before and in shoeing day...means tonight, right?
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Yup - he got bute today after the vet left, and then he'll get another full dose tomorrow before the farrier gets there. I had my vet spell out the full treatment plan and all details multiple times haha.
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post #39 of 48 Old 06-17-2013, 08:12 PM
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To be honest, I personally, still wouldn't shoe. He's doing so good already, chances are, he, maybe with boots, could do the trip anyway, especially when in bedding.
I hope you'll find low NSC hay in NV....I'm having serious problems here......
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post #40 of 48 Old 06-17-2013, 08:35 PM Thread Starter
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OH, I forgot to mention - my trimmer asked if his feet had lost the concavity that they had two weeks ago when she worked on him. She was curious because the did look good when she was out, but she was wondering if that had changed and was contributing to his lameness. My vet said no, his feet were still concave and they hadn't dropped. No flat feet! That's one more positive thing to count :)
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