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Protein?

This is a discussion on Protein? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
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        06-27-2009, 07:00 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    Unfortunately no grain isn't much of an option either. My horse is in a paddock with another horse. He'd flip his gizzard if he saw all the other horses getting grain and he just had his little flake of hay.
    Have them feed him the 5-7 lbs of timothy cubes that I recommended while the other horses are having grain. Or have them give just 1/2 lb of grain along with the hay cubes.

    Quote:
    This boy is an eating machine. I also can't be around everyday to do snack time. I usually can do it 5 days a week. I work 92 miles away, so it's not like I can shoot over at lunch time if I get stuck working a day shift.
    If you can't be there for his mid-day meal everyday, then I'd see if you could work something out with a stable worker or other reliable boarder to feed for you. He needs to be fed consistently everyday.

    Quote:
    As it is, I have to keep him away from the other horses for snack time so they don't all get jealous, and it takes him a good 30 minutes to eat what he's getting now. If I double it, I'll be standing there for an hour. It really sucks that my hands are tied. I have a feeling you're right about the grain, but there's not much I can do about it other than switch him back over to the higher protein stuff or maybe cut it down to half. Thanks for the input just the same.
    Can you have him stalled during meal time? Can you feed him after your ride/work and leave him up in his stall? If you can't work something out, he can't have a stall, and they won't feed more hay and the hay cubes, then I'd start looking for a new place to board closer to your home or work that offers a private paddock or stall time.
         
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        06-27-2009, 07:11 PM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    I have the option of going back to 50/50 LS and another higher protein combo. Do you think there's anything to gain there by adding extra protein?
    The Blue Seal LS isn't a bad feed, for a normal horse, but I'm telling you, these high energy hard keepers just don't do great on any kinds of feed or grains. They end up needing a TON of food like your boy, just to keep their weigh up. As soon as you get rid of the feed and go to nearly all hay or hay products, they start putting on quality weight.
         
        06-27-2009, 07:30 PM
      #13
    Trained
    Luvs2ride, I've already stated my limitations with where I am. My horse is not emaciated by any means. I feel like I have most of the puzzle solved. He is gaining weight. I like where I am and have no desire to move. Once I get to the weight I want, I do plan to cut back as much as I can on grain since I do agree with you that it tends to fire up their fat burning furnace. I am simply looking for information on protein as I feel I missed something there.
         
        06-27-2009, 07:46 PM
      #14
    Green Broke
    You're paying board. You should be able to dictate your horse's care. 15 lbs of hay is barely enough for a 15h air fern of a horse (extremely easy keeper). If it's their Blue Seal feed, they should be more than willing to swap out more expensive feed for cheaper hay and hay cubes...

    This is why I don't board anymore. I only found one place that would listen to me and do what *I* said for my horses (and they had private paddocks). I stayed there as long as I could, before we bought our small property. The place had only a small arena, round pen, no barn stalls for use, no covered arena, no wash racks, etc., but they fed as much high quality hay as I wanted my horses to have and actually fed exactly what I wanted them to eat. That and the private paddocks with shelters was worth more to me than any fancy boarding stable around (and yes, we do have some very well equipped places). I searched for a long time before I found it, and was on a waiting list for 6 months to get in, but it was well worth it. It ended up not even costing me as much as the fancier barns, so that was definitely a plus .

    Anyhow, good luck in whatever you decide to do. Just remember to keep it simple. We can make feeding horses as complex and difficult as we want, but the horse's digestive system is simple. So simple works better!
         
        06-27-2009, 08:46 PM
      #15
    Started
    They need so many grams of protien per day depending on age and work level .. extra protien IS not a issue on a healthy horse at all

    I feed a 32% ration balancer ONLY with free choice hay

    You can't look at the % on the bag you have to figure amount fed and averages on everything
         
        06-27-2009, 08:54 PM
      #16
    Trained
    I did average all of the things I'm giving him. It comes out to 8.4%. He needs at least 10%, no?
         
        06-27-2009, 09:24 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    I was told 8-12% protein is "normal". My horses average about 9-10%.
         
        06-27-2009, 09:34 PM
      #18
    Started
    10% of total diet is "average" the is no set in stone number for any horses
    Younger horses need MORE middle aged idle horse sneed alittle less ...

    It is also about the QUALITY of the protien they will need MORE of a lower digestable protien then a high avaiable one
         
        06-28-2009, 12:11 AM
      #19
    Weanling
    Is this what you are feeding?

    VINTAGE PERFORMANCE
    LS

    LOW-STARCH
    EXTRUDED HORSE FEED

    For Performance Horses
    GUARANTEED ANALYSIS
    Crude Protein, Min. ......................................... 12.0 %
    Lysine, Min. .................................................. ... 0.60 %
    Methionine, Min. ............................................. 0.30 %
    Crude Fat, Min. ............................................... 12.0 %
    Crude Fiber, Max. ........................................... 20.0 %
    Calcium, Min. ............ 0.65 % Max. ............ 1.15 %
    Phosphorus, Min. ............................................ 0.60 %
    Copper, Min. .................................................. 50 ppm
    Chelated Copper, Min. ................................... 12 ppm
    Manganese, Min. ......................................... 130 ppm
    Chelated Manganese, Min. ............................ 20 ppm
    Selenium, Min. ............................................ 0.55 ppm
    Zinc, Min. .................................................. ... 160 ppm
    Chelated Zinc, Min. ........................................ 40 ppm
    Vitamin A, Min. .......................................... 5,000 IU/lb
    Vitamin E, Min. ............................................. 155 IU/lb
    INGREDIENTS
    Soybean Hulls, Dried Beet Pulp, Vegetable Oil,
    Wheat Middlings, Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal, Wheat
    Flour, Rice Bran, Ground Corn, Soybean Meal, Corn
    Distillers Dried Grains, Salt, Calcium Carbonate,
    Monocalcium Phosphate, Yeast Culture, L-Lysine
    Monohydrochloride, DL-Methionine, Magnesium
    Oxide, Calcium Sulfate, Zinc Sulfate, Zinc Proteinate,
    Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese
    Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Cobalt Carbonate,
    Calcium Iodate, Ferrous Sulfate, Selenium Yeast,
    Sodium Selenite, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3
    Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Choline
    Chloride, Riboflavin, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Niacin,
    Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Thiamine
    Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, L-Ascorbyl-2-
    Polyphosphate (Source of Vitamin C), Oat Mill
    By-Product.
    CAUTION: This feed contains supplemental
    Copper. Do not feed to sheep.
    MANUFACTURED BY
    BLUE SEAL
    FEEDS, INC.
    P. O. Box 8000, Londonderry, NH 03053

         
        06-28-2009, 12:25 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    Here is a plug in calculator Nutrient Requirements of Horses - Working Doc
    You pick the type of hay and amount and will estimate the nutrient content.
    Will also show what your feed and supplements need to make up for to achieve daily requirements for your horses demographics.
         

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