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Pssm?

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  • PSSM P1 gene
  • Best feed for pssm horse

 
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    11-06-2010, 02:14 AM
  #11
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by taylormadeappys    
Rachael...how dare you use pictures of Unique in this way! You are using her image without my permission....along with private emails without my permission. And your ignorance of PSSM is ridiculous. I told you about Unique's PSSM up front...before any deal was finalized. I recent that you are incinuating that I was less than honest about Unique's PSSM. We only found out about Predestined's PSSM a few months ago and we have been very up front about it since. I have contacted as many Predestined foal owners as possible about the issue and how to handle it. And your comments about Unique not having TOP breeding is showing your ignorance about Appaloosa breeding. Predestined is the TOP producing son of Maids Dream!!! Don't ever refer to Unique as a poor little foal and what a waste again. She may have a disease but it is being responsibly handled and will lead a long, happy, useful life.
Whether she leads a long and useful life is something that will only be determined with time.........I hope she is one of the lucky ones. My hope is now that you know this that you will not breed another possible PSSM foal.

Being responsible is not breeding any mare or stallion known to care this genic disorder.

Super Nova
     
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    11-06-2010, 01:01 PM
  #12
Foal
We DID NOT know that our stallion had PSSM until this summer. He is a 12 year old stallion with no issues and none of his foals had either until one filly was having problems. We IMMEDIATELY had him tested and were shocked that he was n/P1. There was NEVER any reason to suspect it until then.

You know, PSSM has been around for hundreds of years...this is not a new thing. Horses have been bred that "tie up" all the time. If YOU have stock horses, I challenge you to have them tested. I think you will be shocked that 1/3 of your horses "statistically" will have it. We have been nothing but up front out our stallion having it....each foal is tested and buyers are informed...as was Rachael when we were talking. Think what you will but Unique's diet has been changed to protect her from issues....THAT'S what a responsible owner/breeder does when thrown a curve ball...
     
    11-06-2010, 01:07 PM
  #13
Foal
Quote:
You know, PSSM has been around for hundreds of years...this is not a new thing. Horses have been bred that "tie up" all the time. If YOU have stock horses, I challenge you to have them tested. I think you will be shocked that 1/3 of your horses "statistically" will have it. We have been nothing but up front out our stallion having it....each foal is tested and buyers are informed...as was Rachael when we were talking. Think what you will but Unique's diet has been changed to protect her from issues....THAT'S what a responsible owner/breeder does when thrown a curve ball...
Lets also try not to breed any more of these pssm horses to continue to cloud up horse lines with it
     
    11-06-2010, 01:39 PM
  #14
Foal
PSSM is nothing like HYPP. If is vey common in and has been recognized in many draft breeds for years but is just now being recognized in stock horses.

It is easily treated and fully REVERSIBLE through diet (high fat/fiber/low NSC)

Just google it for many links to accurate information

I personally would not breed a horse with it, but the issues are different than with other genetic defects.

It is irresponsible to compare it to HYPP
     
    11-06-2010, 01:48 PM
  #15
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by taylormadeappys    
We DID NOT know that our stallion had PSSM until this summer. He is a 12 year old stallion with no issues and none of his foals had either until one filly was having problems. We IMMEDIATELY had him tested and were shocked that he was n/P1. There was NEVER any reason to suspect it until then.

You know, PSSM has been around for hundreds of years...this is not a new thing. Horses have been bred that "tie up" all the time. If YOU have stock horses, I challenge you to have them tested. I think you will be shocked that 1/3 of your horses "statistically" will have it. We have been nothing but up front out our stallion having it....each foal is tested and buyers are informed...as was Rachael when we were talking. Think what you will but Unique's diet has been changed to protect her from issues....THAT'S what a responsible owner/breeder does when thrown a curve ball...
Well it was responsible of you to have your stallion tested after one of his foals was found to have PSSM.......I think everyone should have stallions and mares tested for this........unfortunately the blood test that is performed can only pick up certian percent......that percent varies depending on who you talk to....the average is about 50 to 70% at best. My gelding had a muscle biopsy done in order to confirm PSSM as a blood test work failed to identify his particular case.

Changing a foals diet will not necessarily protect them from having sypmptoms of the disease......my guy was on a PSSM diet and while it helped with his intitial symptoms it has not made him rideable...the best he can manage is being a pasture pet......he also has some heart issues which are probably related to the disease. How well your foal does will be dependent on the severity of muscle involvement.

Now that you know that your stallion carries the gene the responsible thing would be to geld your stallion so he can't reproduce and continue to pass this gene on.

As an owner of a horse that has a PSSM horse it has been devasting knowning my guy will never reach his full potential........he is everything you would want in a horse....he has great conformation, unusal color (dun), tall but not too tall 16.1 hands, easy go and unflappable and a desire to please....and good looking to boot.

Super Nova
     
    11-06-2010, 01:54 PM
  #16
Yearling
Just from an outsider's point of view, the OP never insinuated that you were less than honest about the diagnosis. I got the sense that you were very upfront with her. We didn't know that she didn't have the right to share the photo but IMO you came across as a person who shared all current info on this filly.

Harold and Maude- you are extremely misinformed on this disease. And YES this stallion should be castrated to avoid further breeding. This is a veterinary fact, not a "breeding" opinion. Breeders opinions are what have caused things like HYPP, SCID, and several other genetic disorders to persist in the populations.
     
    11-06-2010, 02:06 PM
  #17
Foal
With proper management 80% of horses with PSSM (types 1&2) go on to lead perfectly normal, healthly, useful lives

Not the case with HYPP

I have never seen a horse with PSSM just drop while being ridden (this also happens with HYPP)

I did say I wouldn't breed a horse with PSSM

I'm sorry if you think I'm misinformed but I stand by what I said. They are very diferrent issues
     
    11-06-2010, 02:18 PM
  #18
Foal
Thank you HaroldNMaude....unfortunately, putting capital letters in front of some people makes them think that it is a death sentence. PSSM is FAR from that. It is a very treatable/manageable disease that is not 100% passed on to offspring. When I found out that Unique has it, I immediately went into "prevention mode". I changed her diet, per my vet, and all has been great. She never had a symptom before but I didn't want to take any chances. I still have to feed her...she just gets fed something different....no big deal.
Thank you again....
     
    11-06-2010, 02:46 PM
  #19
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by HaroldandMaude    
With proper management 80% of horses with PSSM (types 1&2) go on to lead perfectly normal, healthly, useful lives

Not the case with HYPP

I have never seen a horse with PSSM just drop while being ridden (this also happens with HYPP)

I did say I wouldn't breed a horse with PSSM

I'm sorry if you think I'm misinformed but I stand by what I said. They are very diferrent issues
Well having it manageble in 80% of the cases is great but what about the other 20% of horses..........I think with the idenfication of the disease we now have a chance of removing it from the gene pool and we should try to do so.

H & M I am glad to hear you won't be breeding any horses that carry the PSSM gene.

Super Nova
     
    11-06-2010, 02:55 PM
  #20
Foal
H&M misspoke....95% of horses with PSSM are manageable through diet. Also, 95% of all PSSM horses NEVER have a symptom. Like I said...this has been around for hundreds of years...now that it can be tested for and has "capital letters" to describe it, people think it's a death sentence....it is NOT! I have learned a lot in the past few months and the more I learn, the more I realize that these horses with PSSM are regular, normal horses and they should be treated that way.
     

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