questions about beet pulp
 
 

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questions about beet pulp

This is a discussion on questions about beet pulp within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Feeding a horse soy beet pulp
  • Does beet pulp prevent sand colic

 
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    11-16-2011, 01:55 PM
  #1
Banned
questions about beet pulp

So I have been feeding my horses beet pulp for a while now. Just losing a horse Monday to complications during a Colic surgery, and I am trying to really focus on absolutely everything that goes into the stomachs of the rest of my horses. I use shredded beet pulp, which I soak. The ingredients are beet pulp and soy oil. On the bag it breaks down the nutrients which are: Crude Protein 7.5%, Crude Fat 2%, Crude Fiber 19%, and ADF 28%.

Now, I know I should have been paying this much attention the whole time, I am aware... I am not asking for people to bash on me for not knowing every exact amount of nutrients. I lost a horse the day before yesterday. I admit my faults, be gentile please.

That being said... What exactly does ADF stand for? I am very surprised that the fiber and fat aren't the highest percentages. I know some of the grain supplements I use contain ADF as well.

How much ADF is too much? How much is reasonable?

Thanks in advance.
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    11-16-2011, 03:00 PM
  #2
Started
Sorry for your loss. I just lost a horse I had for 23 years to colic a couple weeks ago. Pasture isn't the same without him.

Here's an explanation of ADF

Beet pulp.... Is it bad for horses? - Page 2

I doubt beet pulp did it to your friend. I've been using the stuff for 45 years.
     
    11-16-2011, 03:12 PM
  #3
Banned
No, it was crimped corn that did it to my friend. We had just added it to the beet pulp, and was adding some dry on top of their grain. The vet gave me a nice explanation on the corn... Although she actually died of heart failure during surgery for blockage. The vet even said beet pulp is great for putting on weight at fantastic for the GI tract. He suggested that we increase the amount of beet pulp to help get more weight on my guys.


Thank you for the link and information, I appreciate it very much. I am very sorry for your loss as well.
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    11-16-2011, 03:31 PM
  #4
Started
The palomino in my avatar is the one I lost. Picture was taken 2 days before he died. He was 34. The pony is 37. Both beet pulp babies.

I do always soak it. I had one choke once bad. It was only a handful of dry I threw on the ground to keep my draft mare from helping me around the barn
but she gagged up so bad it took the vet what seemed like ages to clear it.

Curious to hear what your vet said about corn. I only give a small handful here and there as a treat and that's scratch feed that I keep around for my chickens and the wild birds in winter.
     
    11-16-2011, 04:32 PM
  #5
Banned
Basically he said that its really hard for horses to digest corn. Its great for cows and chickens and other animals but its no good for horses. The bacteria in their GI tract can't break down corn, so it actually will ferment in their stomachs.

I had heard from several people that its good to help put weight on horses, so I figured I'd try it. He said yes, its high in calories, but very hard on their digestive systems. I have 150 lbs of corn I need to get rid of now.

My other 5 horses have been totally fine with the corn. This mare was prone to colic. She had sand colic several times but was always fine and there was never a blockage. The vet is almost 100% sure that the difference this time was the corn.

So I am eliminating it all together. I don't want to take the chance of stomach upset with any of my others.

I have never had an issue with beet pulp, always get the shredded and always soak it. I have never had a choke, thank God. This was my first really traumatic experience as a horse owner. First horse death too. She was only 8 years old. A baby. Some would say that I am lucky, 15 years of horse ownership, and this was my first death. I am not sure "luck" would be the word to describe it. She was the first horse to come to my barn and leave. Everyone else that's ever lived here and belonged to me, is still here. I keep them until one of us dies, I never imagined how it'd feel when that came true.

Thanks again!
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    11-16-2011, 06:57 PM
  #6
Trained
Hi, yeah, depending who you ask, you'll come up with all sorts of recommendations about what to feed, even sold as horse feed at stock feed stores, but if you speak to someone who understands equine digestion n nutrition, they'll tell you why corn n other high strarch grains n feeds are problematic for horses. I'd always at least double check with a nutritionist or knowledgeable equine vet before just trying something new. Beet pulp, so long as unsweetened seems to be a great hard feed for horses n is around a similar energy level to oats if you're wanting weight gain.
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    11-16-2011, 07:52 PM
  #7
Banned
Okay, so after reading the article, I am a bit confused. Is the woman suggesting that people not feed grain, and just feed hay/ grass/ beet pulp? I am not sure my horses would thrive with just that. Their grain is a pretty important part of their diet. And I don't live in a place where we have green healthy grass year round, so grazing all the time isn't an option. We just put new fencing up and made our paddocks much larger. The dirt under the grass comes up in chunks a lot of the time when they're grazing. So I try to limit the grazing time, as to try and avoid sand colic. And the beet pulp will help clear out sand, correct?
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    11-16-2011, 11:33 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Beet pulp does not remove sand. You need Sand Clear or one of the other various brands of that to remove sand.
     
    11-16-2011, 11:42 PM
  #9
Banned
I feed everyone psyllium for a week out of every month.

But I thought what I was just reading about beet pulp is that the part of it that is insoluble turns to a type of "gel" like substance, which in turn will help collect sand particles and carry them thru the GI tract. Like metimucil.

Please correct me if I misunderstood. I don't feed beet pulp for that reason (I feed it because it helps put on weight, and is a healthy source of fiber,) but it would be cool if it helped with sand too. Bonus.
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    11-17-2011, 12:53 AM
  #10
Yearling
acid-detergent fiber2 (ADF) a modification of the procedure used to estimate crude fiber in animal feeds; it omits the alkali step, reducing loss of carbohydrates and giving a more accurate estimation. Estimates the proportion of dry matter which is insoluble in acid detergent, I.e. The cellulose and lignin in the sample. The normal range in farm animal feeds is 250-450 g/kg DM. The target for high quality grass silage is 350 g ADF/kg DM.
     

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