"quicked" - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 25 Old 09-12-2011, 09:59 PM Thread Starter
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"quicked"

Sorry, I'm not sure how you spell it when you are talking about a "quicked" hoof. If the farrier quicked a hoof when shoeing, is the lameness immediate or can it take a day or 2 to come on? I'm trying to figure out if I have an abscess or a quick.

Farrier came Thursday night and I went to dinner. Fed Friday AM - he was fine. Lunged Friday PM he seemed fine. Rode Saturday and he took a couple off steps, like he stepped on uneven ground or a rock. Sunday - LAME. Gave him some bute and put him to bed. I texted my farrier today to come check him but he was sick and said he'd be out tomorrow. Still lame. He cantered in for dinner but at the walk there is a slight head bob and at the trot - huge head bob. I can tell which hoof but I feel no heat and I tapped it with the hoof pick and didn't see where the issue was.

Trying to decide if I should just call the vet or let the farrier pull the shoe and reset it? IF he comes out tomorrow. If he doesn't - new farrier. Tired of him not being there when I need him... :(

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post #2 of 25 Old 09-12-2011, 10:49 PM
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There are at least three farrier related possibilities; possibly more.

If nailing intrudes on the sensitive laminae it's called a "hot nail". There is often bleeding associated with a hot nail and the horse will typically present discomfort immediately. In such cases the offending nail is removed and the wound treated with an antimicrobial. In rare cases an infection may occur but more often than not the horse walks off fine and remains so.

If nailing impinges upon sensitive tissues, but doe not intrude, it's called a "close nail". The nail is close enough to sensitive tissue that it creates pressure. This type of insult will typically present some level of lameness within 24 to 48 hours. Again, the farrier simply removes the offending nail. Infection risk is minimal and the animal typically walks off fine once the nail is removed.

Sole pressure can be a third farrier related issue. There should be slight "relief" between the shoe and the sole of the horses foot. While some pre-manufactured shoes have built-in sole relief, I find it is often not enough. Additional sole relief can be forged or ground into the foot side of the shoe before installation. If sole pressure is in excess, lameness can occur shortly after installing the shoes. To correct the problem, the shoe must be removed and additional sole relief provided. The farrier should check for any bruising of the sole if a lack of relief was determined to be causal in the lameness.

Cheers,
Mark
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post #3 of 25 Old 09-12-2011, 10:52 PM
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Love your answers Mark! So well written out & understandable!

Farmpony- I hope everything is sleight with your baby & the farrier gets out soon!
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post #4 of 25 Old 09-13-2011, 12:10 AM
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Wonderful answers, Mark.

Jenny, I just wanted to comment on my experience with quicked horses. Normally, a quicked horse will show some level of lameness immediately (depending on how bad the quicked place was) and is usually back to normal within 2 or 3 days at the most.

All that being said, it is also possible that he was working on an abscess before the farrier came out.
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post #5 of 25 Old 09-13-2011, 12:16 AM
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Mark, I love reading everything you have to say! I learn something new every time :)

Hard to compete with that, so best wishes to your pony, and I hope he turns out okay here soon :)

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It's called a counter canter...
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post #6 of 25 Old 09-13-2011, 01:36 AM
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What Mark says, and I'd find a new farrier. If my farrier 'quicked' my horse or put in a hot or close nail and I had an issue I could call him at 3 in the morning and he'd be here in 30 mins. A good farrier is worth his weight in gold, a bad one isn't worth the energy it takes to kick him off the property. And to me a bad one is one who sores your horse and then wants to take a couple days to get back to you, how bout if you try to take a week or 2 to pay him? Yeah, not so happy huh?

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post #7 of 25 Old 09-13-2011, 09:00 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseman56 View Post
There are at least three farrier related possibilities; possibly more.

If nailing intrudes on the sensitive laminae it's called a "hot nail". There is often bleeding associated with a hot nail and the horse will typically present discomfort immediately. In such cases the offending nail is removed and the wound treated with an antimicrobial. In rare cases an infection may occur but more often than not the horse walks off fine and remains so.

If nailing impinges upon sensitive tissues, but doe not intrude, it's called a "close nail". The nail is close enough to sensitive tissue that it creates pressure. This type of insult will typically present some level of lameness within 24 to 48 hours. Again, the farrier simply removes the offending nail. Infection risk is minimal and the animal typically walks off fine once the nail is removed.

Sole pressure can be a third farrier related issue. There should be slight "relief" between the shoe and the sole of the horses foot. While some pre-manufactured shoes have built-in sole relief, I find it is often not enough. Additional sole relief can be forged or ground into the foot side of the shoe before installation. If sole pressure is in excess, lameness can occur shortly after installing the shoes. To correct the problem, the shoe must be removed and additional sole relief provided. The farrier should check for any bruising of the sole if a lack of relief was determined to be causal in the lameness.

Cheers,
Mark
Thank you very much. I texted my farrier yesterday and he said he was sick and he'd try to come out "tomorrow". I texted him today and he has not responded. Would it be wrong to call a different farrier? One I've never used?

"Be a best friend, tell the truth, and overuse I love you
Go to work, do your best, don't outsmart your common sense
Never let your prayin knees get lazy
And love like crazy"
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post #8 of 25 Old 09-13-2011, 09:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs View Post
All that being said, it is also possible that he was working on an abscess before the farrier came out.
I have to agree with this. This problem might not be related to your farrier at all. Unless you have had other issues with him I would not be so quick to fire him just because he is sick.

You can call another farrier. Be prepared to pay them for their time and work and be prepared to not get instant service. They have clients. You are not one of them.
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post #9 of 25 Old 09-13-2011, 09:58 AM Thread Starter
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I've been using this farrier for about 4 years w/out issue. Other then when I need him he NEVER comes. I'll wait 4 days to a week for him to come and reset it. Is that normal? And I've texted him twice this morning...????

"Be a best friend, tell the truth, and overuse I love you
Go to work, do your best, don't outsmart your common sense
Never let your prayin knees get lazy
And love like crazy"
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post #10 of 25 Old 09-13-2011, 10:00 AM Thread Starter
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He texted. He's coming tonight.

"Be a best friend, tell the truth, and overuse I love you
Go to work, do your best, don't outsmart your common sense
Never let your prayin knees get lazy
And love like crazy"
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