Rain rot - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Rain rot

This is a discussion on Rain rot within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Rain rot horses due to vitamin imbalance
  • What vitamin deficiency causes rain rot on horses

Like Tree5Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-09-2013, 07:47 PM
  #21
Super Moderator
You do not understand. The Vitamin itself is fat soluble. This has nothing to do with how it is packaged or supplied. You can't make the Vitamin be water soluble like the B Vitamins or Vitamin C.

Being Fat soluble simply means that it can be stored in the body in the liver as opposed to being supplied or synthesized on a daily basis as water soluble Vitamins must be. The problem with it is that the Vitamin A stored in the fall from green grass and freshly cut hay runs out long before the new season Vitamin A is available. That is why horses become deficient this time of year.

Good quality 'fortified' feeds supply it. Those horses do not get Rain Rot. When I was fortunate enough to be able to get custom made feed pellets, I always ordered it with 10,000 IU of Vitamin A per pound in it. Then I did not have to worry about where it was going to come from.

Mare Plus, which is the supplement we recommend, supplies 100,000 units per day when fed as directed. This is about the same amount supplied by the oral Vitamin A injectable if it is used once per week. We never use that amount more than 1 or 2 weeks until our feed can supply what is needed.

As you can see, it does not exceed the amount supplied by Farnam in their product. It just corrects the problem faster and cheaper. If you don't like the idea of using the injectable form orally, just wait a little longer for the results and use the Farnam horse product in a horse's feed.

It really is not nearly as complicated as people want to make it. Many Veterinarians should be embarrassed that they do not know any more than they do about nutrition and the part it plays in good health -- but then, they would make a lot less money than treating all of the problems it creates.
Trinity3205 likes this.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-10-2013, 02:07 AM
  #22
Green Broke
My horses only ever got rain rot once when I had them in TN for a short while. I do not know if there was a correlation, but the two that stood under the trees when it rained got it, the other did not. I washed and medicated it with betadiene which seemed to help somewhat, but when I moved them back to the desert (they still had it), it immediately cleared up. All three were on the same diet, and within a few years of each other age wise. I don't think it was a diet issue.
mirage790 likes this.
     
    01-10-2013, 08:49 AM
  #23
Green Broke
I'm with Cherie on this one. After I started my mare on a vitamin supp that had a good amount of vitamin A her skin issues slowly went away. Because I didn't give the straight vit A and used an all around supplement it did take longer but it worked. She no longer gets scratches and the goopy eyes have mostly disappeared. I will be starting her on Mare Plus this weekend as I needed to switch the supplement she is getting. I can tell you right now out of the herd of horses at my barn the not so healthy ones are loaded with skin issues but the healthy ones never get any of them even being in the same herd.
     
    01-10-2013, 10:26 AM
  #24
Super Moderator
MM -- Your assumptions are just that. They are totally irrelevant to cause and effect. The move is much more relevant.

When you live in a dry climate, you remove one of the things that these normal bacteria and fungi need -- moisture and humidity. It does NOT mean that the horses are any healthier or any less deficient in Vitamin A. They will just NOT express it with rain rot like horses in climates with less sunshine and more moisture.

They will, however, have the crusty and runny eyes, will retain their placenta more frequently, have more problems breeding, particularly early in the season and will have other health issues related to Vitamin A if they are not getting enough of it.

The other thing you see in more southern climates is a longer 'green grass season' and hay that has not been in storage as long. So, you may indeed see fewer deficiencies when horses are kept in the southern states -- particularly the drier ones, if their hay and grass is less deficient in A.
     
    01-10-2013, 11:30 AM
  #25
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
MM -- Your assumptions are just that. They are totally irrelevant to cause and effect. The move is much more relevant.

When you live in a dry climate, you remove one of the things that these normal bacteria and fungi need -- moisture and humidity. It does NOT mean that the horses are any healthier or any less deficient in Vitamin A. They will just NOT express it with rain rot like horses in climates with less sunshine and more moisture.

They will, however, have the crusty and runny eyes, will retain their placenta more frequently, have more problems breeding, particularly early in the season and will have other health issues related to Vitamin A if they are not getting enough of it.

The other thing you see in more southern climates is a longer 'green grass season' and hay that has not been in storage as long. So, you may indeed see fewer deficiencies when horses are kept in the southern states -- particularly the drier ones, if their hay and grass is less deficient in A.
I did not make a cause and effect statement, perhaps you misunderstood my post. However, stating rain rot is caused by a vitamin A deficiency is a "cause and effect" statement that would require objective evidence to substantiate, as well as agreement within the scientific community.

Many severe vitamin deficiencies cause immune response decline, which makes most any entity more susceptable to variouse conditions, which is not always the same as being the cause of the condition. Perhaps ruling out vitamin a deficiency is a prudent measure if it has been proven to be necessary in the immune defense for rainrot, but I would not throw away the anti-microbial solutions just yet.
mirage790 likes this.
     

Tags
colt, rain rot, wean

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fantastic Recipe for Rain Scald/ Rain Rot treatment! Conrad And Freddie Horse Health 13 11-17-2013 12:29 AM
Home Remedies for Rain rot/rain scalds... Elizabeth Bowers Horse Health 9 04-18-2012 07:23 AM
Rain Rot or something else Jwheeler331 Horse Health 9 03-13-2012 11:52 AM
Rain Rot appy rider 4 life Horse Health 11 03-18-2009 03:35 PM
Rain, Rain...Please Friggin' Go Away!!!! Small_Town_Girl Horse Talk 15 08-21-2008 01:47 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0