Rain Rot Prevention
   

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Rain Rot Prevention

This is a discussion on Rain Rot Prevention within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Rain rot and cellulitis
  • Rain rot horses prevention

 
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    09-03-2008, 04:37 PM
  #1
Foal
Rain Rot Prevention

My gelding is really sensitive to rain rot. Most recently, his legs started swelling when he got it. Do you have any ideas to prevent rain rot?
     
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    09-03-2008, 09:57 PM
  #2
Started
First place to start is the diet in prevention..
     
    09-12-2008, 06:46 PM
  #3
Trained
Rain rot is a fungal 'disease'. Generally if a horse has well balanced nutrition, particularly that there is enough copper, zinc & sulphur in his diet, he will not be so susceptible to the problems even in conditions that make them likely.
     
    09-12-2008, 08:09 PM
  #4
Started
Re: Rain Rot Prevention

Quote:
Originally Posted by kljumper14
My gelding is really sensitive to rain rot. Most recently, his legs started swelling when he got it. Do you have any ideas to prevent rain rot?
If the swelling in his legs hasn't gone down, it might be best to call a vet because he might be getting cellulitis and cellulitis is not something the owner can get the horse over without the help of meds from a vet.

That happened to my friend's horse a few years ago when her adult niece horse-sat for two weeks while she was on vacation. Fortunately her horse recovered from the cellulite without kidney or liver damage, but cure was labor intensive, not to mention the high cost of the meds required.

While diet surely is important, it isn't the save-all for prevention. For some horses there is no prevention, the Owner has to always be on watch for the earliest signs and start treatment right away.

Poison Oak and sumac can almost cost me a trip to the E-R if I just look at it. Mr. WTW can pull it off the trees and barely get a bubble.

Point-being if your horse is that allergic, I would call the vet and ask for some guidance as far as topical dressings are concerned and also tell him about the leg swelling.

Hope this helps :)
     
    09-13-2008, 12:10 AM
  #5
Green Broke
Best prevention - don't give the fungus a place to live

Be sure his legs are clean - apply antifungal to it and help get rid of the "funk"
     
    09-13-2008, 08:55 AM
  #6
Foal
My gelding did have some swelling from a bruise on his knee, but the initial swelling was caused by rain rot.
     
    09-13-2008, 09:51 AM
  #7
Green Broke
Never heard of swelling from rain rot - as it is a fungal infection - and I've always known it to be strictly topical - it may make the hair puff up with crud underneath, but I don't know how it would cause swelling unless it has traveled into the blood stream or something?
     
    09-13-2008, 11:48 AM
  #8
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by kickshaw
best prevention - don't give the fungus a place to live

Be sure his legs are clean - apply antifungal to it and help get rid of the "funk"
I would have hairless and skinless horses if I didn't spend 2-4 hours every day cleaning and re-cleaning.

I clean stalls every day and deep clean on Saturday. We don't need rain to have rain rot or scratches. All we need is temps over 85 and the humidity to go with it.

Environment plays a huge role. Except for the annual sweet itch on the belly line my Arab has always gotten, my horses never had skin allergy issues until we moved to the southern part of the Tennessee Valley.

The fourth horse I bought two years ago from 100 miles NE of of me, never had skin allergy issues until he came to live on our property.

My county seems to be one of the worst. My vet can't keep up with skin allergies in our county this time of year. Be it inside dogs, outside dogs, or horses.

We have bushhogged four times this year and will have to bushhog one more time to get rid of the sticky pods and seeds on the Dallas grass that grows rampant around here. And that is after a heavy spraying of 2-D-4 in the Spring. We should do it again this fall but the farm tractor needs a clutch to the tune of $1,000. --- which comes first ----me thinks the tractor since renting a big sprayer and buying the 2-D-4 to spray 23 acres is close to $500.

We also have nettle and pig weed. Horse don't eat either, but all they have to do is eat the grass AROUND nettle or pigweed to get an allergic reaction that turns into scratches or whatever it is called in the area one lives.

Pig weed is impossible to kill. It has to literally be hand-pulled up by the roots and if ALL of the root isn't pulled up, it grows back as big as ever.

We have 23 acres, so pulling up pig weed by hand is not going to happen.

The bottom line is that each person has to do the best they can for the environment their horses live in. While not giving the fungus a place to live is the ideal solution, it isn't always possible.

I would have to sell the farm and re-locate somewhere that doesn't have the environmental issues we have. Since we suffer in allergy purgatory for 8 weeks out of the year max, I am not about to pack up and move off this beautiful 23 acres that one person or another tries to buy every other month
     

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